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British overseas territories Watch

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    There are a number of British overseas territories in the world (13 to be exact) most of these are very small, I'm just wondering whether they can gain independence or are they so small they wouldn't be able to cope? :fuhrer::smug::awesome:

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    Hi, the ones probably capable of sustaining themselves have already done so pretty much. The second point you made is probably the reason why the others havent. Along with the fact that Britain is awesome to be a part of anyways!
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    A pro Brit! Woo! High five!

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    There's actually 14, but I'm assuming you're excluding the Antarctic territory.

    I think if any of them showed a desire for independence, the UK would be willing to entertain the idea. At least for those with a permanent civilian population. It would probably only be feasible for the larger ones though. Also I think Gibraltar can't be independent because there's a treaty that means it would become part of Spain if the UK dropped it's claim to it.
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    (Original post by Jordan-James)
    Hi, the ones probably capable of sustaining themselves have already done so pretty much. The second point you made is probably the reason why the others havent. Along with the fact that Britain is awesome to be a part of anyways!
    There's a few independent countries in the pacific that have smaller populations than some of the BOTs though. And even if they were independent (as in sovereign), it doesn't necessarily mean the UK wouldn't support them to some extent if they need it.
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    Ah, yeah. of course, for the first few years at least

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    (Original post by Hilly1)
    Ah, yeah. of course, for the first few years at least

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    Yeah, I was thinking a relationship like this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact...ee_Association
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    It would be a bit pointless given that they have near complete autonomy and contribute very little to their defense, would have no global influence anyway and get to be tax havens as it is.

    It's also marginally advantageous for the UK to have them, a presence in other areas of the world, easier to prosecute people evading tax ect.. and their defense costs a pittance.
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    (Original post by Hilly1)
    There are a number of British overseas territories in the world (13 to be exact) most of these are very small, I'm just wondering whether they can gain independence or are they so small they wouldn't be able to cope? :fuhrer::smug::awesome:

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    They have the option and chose not to.
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    Do they want to be independent? The Falklands referendum showed overwhelmingly at least one of them was resoloutely British.
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    Gibraltar is another awkward one given Spain keeps demanding it back.
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    (Original post by Morgsie)
    Gibraltar is another awkward one given Spain keeps demanding it back.
    I believe the people of Gibraltar have been rather persistently clear as to their wishes on that score. The last referendum I am aware of was 2002, in which about 98.5% voted to stay with the UK, on an 87.9% turnout.
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    Bermuda is both sustainable as a state and there is an independence movement there. There was a referendum on it in 1995, with 26% in favour.

    The Turks and Caicos Islanders have expressed interest in independence and don't really have much by way of British identity at all. Their Premier supported it, but it turned out it was largely a ploy to avoid an inquiry into his party's huge corruption.

    He fled the country and the UK had him arrested. Direct rule by the Governor (rather than elected representatives) started, which his party called being "invaded and re-colonised".

    The last Chief Minister of Anguilla was a separatist, and very, very... forthright in his views about it. The current one, however, is more moderate.

    It's been mentioned in the British Virgin Islands, but I don't think there's much call for it there.

    The main separation of territories in terms of independence appealing tends to be racial. Even in Bermuda, it appeals far more to the blacks than the Europeans. There's some overlap here in terms of British identity: places like Gib, St Helena and the Falklands have that identity. The Carribean territories, considerably less so.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Bermuda is both sustainable as a state and there is an independence movement there. There was a referendum on it in 1995, with 26% in favour.

    The Turks and Caicos Islanders have expressed interest in independence and don't really have much by way of British identity at all. Their Premier supported it, but it turned out it was largely a ploy to avoid an inquiry into his party's huge corruption.

    He fled the country and the UK had him arrested. Direct rule by the Governor (rather than elected representatives) started, which his party called being "invaded and re-colonised".

    The last Chief Minister of Anguilla was a separatist, and very, very... forthright in his views about it. The current one, however, is more moderate.

    It's been mentioned in the British Virgin Islands, but I don't think there's much call for it there.

    The main separation of territories in terms of independence appealing tends to be racial. Even in Bermuda, it appeals far more to the blacks than the Europeans. There's some overlap here in terms of British identity: places like Gib, St Helena and the Falklands have that identity. The Carribean territories, considerably less so.
    One important factor now with the Caribbean territories is the full British citizenship/EU citizenship. That has arisen since 2002 and the potential loss of that status on independence is likely to influence local independence debates. Young people and parents/grandparents with aspirations for family members to work abroad may regard that right as more important than political independence.
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    Hm. Yeah, I think you're probably right.. work permits to work across the entire EU. Economic reasons. Gibraltar doesn't want independence. They pretty much resoundly agreed with remaining British in 2002. I do however think, that the further you go away from Europe (excluding TFI) there tends to be less more seperatist feelings.
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    (Original post by Hilly1)
    Hm. Yeah, I think you're probably right.. work permits to work across the entire EU. Economic reasons. Gibraltar doesn't want independence. They pretty much resoundly agreed with remaining British in 2002. I do however think, that the further you go away from Europe (excluding TFI) there tends to be less more seperatist feelings.
    But the thing is that referendum really was a choice between remaining a British territory or becoming part of Spain. Independence isn't an option for them (unless Spain agrees to it), so for all we know the opinion might be different if it was an option.

    I don't think it's a coincidence that the two territories that are the most resolutely British are the ones that are under threat of being taken over by another state.
 
 
 
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