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    Hello everyone, I really hope I've posted this in the correct section, there's a load of sections and it's slightly daunting!
    I'm in the lower six (Sixth Form) and I'm wondering about laptops. One of my friends has been granted permission to use laptops in his AS exams as long as he uses his laptop in everyday lessons. He knows the material but he's a slightly slow writer and his hand writing isn't as clear as other people's, and most teachers recognised that time for him would be an issue in the exams.
    Now, about me, my hand writing can be neat if I'm taking it easy, but when I'm in timed conditions then my writing can get very scruffy and almost illegible - I'm not sure if there is any particular criterion set to be authorised a laptop in the exam. My two cents is that everyone should have the right of using means they feel more comfortable with, but I'm not sure how the law / schools operate this.
    If it is only persons with recognised "disabilities" getting the opportunity to be given laptops, then I would find that a trifle bit unfair. I think of it like a race. If someone's car is unreliable and a little bit slow, them being given a car twice as fast as everybody else's isn't exactly fair. It's proven that the average typing speeds are higher than the average hand writing speeds, after all.
    I await your responses. Thanks in advance.
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    (Original post by conscientiouspup)
    Hello everyone, I really hope I've posted this in the correct section, there's a load of sections and it's slightly daunting!
    I'm in the lower six (Sixth Form) and I'm wondering about laptops. One of my friends has been granted permission to use laptops in his AS exams as long as he uses his laptop in everyday lessons. He knows the material but he's a slightly slow writer and his hand writing isn't as clear as other people's, and most teachers recognised that time for him would be an issue in the exams.
    Now, about me, my hand writing can be neat if I'm taking it easy, but when I'm in timed conditions then my writing can get very scruffy and almost illegible - I'm not sure if there is any particular criterion set to be authorised a laptop in the exam. My two cents is that everyone should have the right of using means they feel more comfortable with, but I'm not sure how the law / schools operate this.
    If it is only persons with recognised "disabilities" getting the opportunity to be given laptops, then I would find that a trifle bit unfair. I think of it like a race. If someone's car is unreliable and a little bit slow, them being given a car twice as fast as everybody else's isn't exactly fair. It's proven that the average typing speeds are higher than the average hand writing speeds, after all.
    I await your responses. Thanks in advance.
    I can assure you that the examiners have dealt with the scruffiest handwriting!

    You're right that it's not fair on those writing with a pen in their hand.

    Also, it's part of the assessment. They want to see if you can structure proper answers to the Qs under certain time constraints.
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    (Original post by conscientiouspup)
    Hello everyone, I really hope I've posted this in the correct section, there's a load of sections and it's slightly daunting!
    I'm in the lower six (Sixth Form) and I'm wondering about laptops. One of my friends has been granted permission to use laptops in his AS exams as long as he uses his laptop in everyday lessons. He knows the material but he's a slightly slow writer and his hand writing isn't as clear as other people's, and most teachers recognised that time for him would be an issue in the exams.
    Now, about me, my hand writing can be neat if I'm taking it easy, but when I'm in timed conditions then my writing can get very scruffy and almost illegible - I'm not sure if there is any particular criterion set to be authorised a laptop in the exam. My two cents is that everyone should have the right of using means they feel more comfortable with, but I'm not sure how the law / schools operate this.
    If it is only persons with recognised "disabilities" getting the opportunity to be given laptops, then I would find that a trifle bit unfair. I think of it like a race. If someone's car is unreliable and a little bit slow, them being given a car twice as fast as everybody else's isn't exactly fair. It's proven that the average typing speeds are higher than the average hand writing speeds, after all.
    I await your responses. Thanks in advance.
    These measures aren't put into place to give disabled students an extra edge over able bodied students, they're there to make sure that they have an equal opportunity to do well, despite their disability.
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    There's a huge difference between scruffy handwriting and having a medical condition which makes writing difficult.
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    (Original post by conscientiouspup)
    If it is only persons with recognised "disabilities" getting the opportunity to be given laptops, then I would find that a trifle bit unfair. I think of it like a race. If someone's car is unreliable and a little bit slow, them being given a car twice as fast as everybody else's isn't exactly fair. It's proven that the average typing speeds are higher than the average hand writing speeds, after all.
    I await your responses. Thanks in advance.
    Do you have a disability? If not, I'm not sure what you're hoping to achieve by posting in this forum.

    And as for the difference between typing and writing speeds, this should be taken into account.

    Normally only a person with a medical condition or disability (including learning difference) will be able to use a laptop or desktop for written exams. Not all students with disabilities will be able to use a laptop or desktop. Whether permission is granted depends on the individual needs of the student and whether extra time can suitable compensate.

    (Original post by Indeterminate)
    I can assure you that the examiners have dealt with the scruffiest handwriting!

    You're right that it's not fair on those writing with a pen in their hand.
    If a person's typing speed is too fast, then invariably other arrangements are given.

    Also, it's part of the assessment. They want to see if you can structure proper answers to the Qs under certain time constraints.
    I don't fully agree with that. Timed exams were introduced primarily to save time for the examiners. However, time limits are still imposed even if a person is granted the use of a laptop, aren't they? Providing a computer does not mean unlimited time is being given.
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    (Original post by River85)
    Do you have a disability? If not, I'm not sure what you're hoping to achieve by posting in this forum.
    As I said at the very beginning of my first post, I wasn't quite sure where to post it. If you could suggest a better forum, I'd like it to be moved there if any admin would be willing to do so. Thanks for the responses..
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    (Original post by conscientiouspup)
    As I said at the very beginning of my first post, I wasn't quite sure where to post it. If you could suggest a better forum, I'd like it to be moved there if any admin would be willing to do so. Thanks for the responses..
    Well I am a moderator of all universities forums (including Disabled Students) as well as Education in Debate and Discussion so I can move it.

    But I don't know what you're actually asking so it's difficult to move it to a more appropriate subforum without knowing the purpose of the thread.

    I wanted to know if you or your friend have a disability.

    Because as far as I know, computers are only allowed for certain people with disabilities, and not just people with "bad" handwriting.
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    (Original post by River85)
    If a person's typing speed is too fast, then invariably other arrangements are given.

    I don't fully agree with that. Timed exams were introduced primarily to save time for the examiners. However, time limits are still imposed even if a person is granted the use of a laptop, aren't they? Providing a computer does not mean unlimited time is being given.
    Don't people who use laptops have to undergo a test to see whether they need extra time? And is it possible for someone who uses a laptop in exams to be awarded less time than a non-disabled student who uses pen and paper?
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    Major bump, but going back to this I find my sixth forms policy on this somewhat interesting. I am granted a laptop for my exams, based on the fact I have 'scruffy handwriting'. One teacher moaned at me and said he can't read it sometimes, I went to go and see learning support, shown them an essay which was probably the worse handwritten one I've done and they put me on the list for a laptop for about ten other people. Do I deserve it? No way. Does it give me an advantage? I can probably right 2/3 or even 50% more than others, and of course, it can be beneficial in the sense you get a number of chances to quickly correct grammar and be more accurate with it.

    That said, I do have a bit of angst that examiners may mark harshly due to the fact they know I have more time (effectively) due to the fact the typical teenager will type significantly quicker than what they can write.

    Sixth forms and schools most definitely do not apply to an exam board or anything to grant a student use of a laptop in an exam, and despite what is stated above, you most certainly do not need a disability.
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    You can type faster than you can write?
    Get out of here!
    Most can't.
    Oh and good luck with US spell checkers!
    They don't correct incorrect grammar either, as is clear in the above post.
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    (Original post by Jack59)
    Major bump, but going back to this I find my sixth forms policy on this somewhat interesting. I am granted a laptop for my exams, based on the fact I have 'scruffy handwriting'. One teacher moaned at me and said he can't read it sometimes, I went to go and see learning support, shown them an essay which was probably the worse handwritten one I've done and they put me on the list for a laptop for about ten other people. Do I deserve it? No way. Does it give me an advantage? I can probably right 2/3 or even 50% more than others, and of course, it can be beneficial in the sense you get a number of chances to quickly correct grammar and be more accurate with it.

    That said, I do have a bit of angst that examiners may mark harshly due to the fact they know I have more time (effectively) due to the fact the typical teenager will type significantly quicker than what they can write.

    Sixth forms and schools most definitely do not apply to an exam board or anything to grant a student use of a laptop in an exam, and despite what is stated above, you most certainly do not need a disability.
    Is this something that definitely happens?
    Being given a laptop for my A2's in June, due to ineligible writing.

    Surely they have to mark us on the exact same criteria as everyone else?
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    We don't even get cushioned seats, and asking for laptops...well i'll be damned
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    (Original post by Jack59)
    Sixth forms and schools most definitely do not apply to an exam board or anything to grant a student use of a laptop in an exam, and despite what is stated above, you most certainly do not need a disability.
    It's not the same at a university.

    Mine insisted I had to have been granted DSA before I was permitted to use a uni-controlled PC (not a laptop) for exams. I have a permanently dislocated right thumb (I'm right-handed) which means that I physically cannot hand write for three solid hours. I was offered more time as part of my assessment, but I turned it down as I actually do type at least as fast as I used to be able to hand write before my thumb went. I didn't want an advantage, just a level playing field.

    Many unis will allow use of a controlled PC for exams, without DSA being awarded. However at my uni they were specifically not permitted for people with poor/illegible handwriting but no underlying physical or cognitive issue which may be causing it. I believe that this is a common policy.

    If you're planning on uni, be aware that you won't necessarily be granted the same exam facilities provided by your school/college.
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    Access to a Laptop is not designed to give disabled students an advantage, it is designed to level the playing field to allow them to access the same kind of educational opportunities. The decisions are therefore granted on a individual basis, some time in conjuction with other dispensations, as for those with disabilities even if there typing speed is very fast there are still issues with processing, and reading . You wrightly mention that they have to be used in lessons this is part of normal way of working and they must also provide evidence of need so it is not as simple as improving scores.
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    I've only skimmed through the majority of replies on here...
    But at my 6th form you didn't have to have an official diagnosis of anything to get a laptop. However you did have to do a laptop/typing test which involved several different tasks to do with both handwriting and typing and was basically assessing whether your handwriting was below a certain level (taking into account both speed and legibility). So maybe this is an option for you?



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    (Original post by Arihc)
    I've only skimmed through the majority of replies on here...
    But at my 6th form you didn't have to have an official diagnosis of anything to get a laptop. However you did have to do a laptop/typing test which involved several different tasks to do with both handwriting and typing and was basically assessing whether your handwriting was below a certain level (taking into account both speed and legibility). So maybe this is an option for you?



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    As per replies above, not at university. You need an underlying physical or cognitive problem and you can't just cite "poor handwriting".
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    As per replies above, not at university. You need an underlying physical or cognitive problem and you can't just cite "poor handwriting".
    At my university you can get extra time/alternative arrangements without formal diagnosis, I had alternative exam arrangements throughout my first year but wasn't formally diagnosed until middle of 2nd year


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    (Original post by conscientiouspup)
    Hello everyone, I really hope I've posted this in the correct section, there's a load of sections and it's slightly daunting!
    I'm in the lower six (Sixth Form) and I'm wondering about laptops. One of my friends has been granted permission to use laptops in his AS exams as long as he uses his laptop in everyday lessons. He knows the material but he's a slightly slow writer and his hand writing isn't as clear as other people's, and most teachers recognised that time for him would be an issue in the exams.
    Now, about me, my hand writing can be neat if I'm taking it easy, but when I'm in timed conditions then my writing can get very scruffy and almost illegible - I'm not sure if there is any particular criterion set to be authorised a laptop in the exam. My two cents is that everyone should have the right of using means they feel more comfortable with, but I'm not sure how the law / schools operate this.
    If it is only persons with recognised "disabilities" getting the opportunity to be given laptops, then I would find that a trifle bit unfair. I think of it like a race. If someone's car is unreliable and a little bit slow, them being given a car twice as fast as everybody else's isn't exactly fair. It's proven that the average typing speeds are higher than the average hand writing speeds, after all.
    I await your responses. Thanks in advance.
    To be honest with you, I think it's fair that you have to write in exams. If you're capable of writing under timed conditions in exams, even if you have scruffy handwriting, it's fair. Most people have scruffy handwriting in exams anyway. Those who can't write under time conditions in exams for whatever reason wish they could like you can, trust me.

    As someone with a medical condition that causes me to write illegible in exams, I think it's fair I was offered a laptop to do my A2 exams on. We have no particular advantage over those who are capable of writing under timed conditions, it's just that we have a different way of doing our exams. Not to mention how annoying notepad can be when typing our exam answers up.

    My sixth form college was extremely strict when it came to granting people laptops. As far as my college is concerned, you need to have a medical condition to be granted a laptop or other forms of help in exams, so I guess other colleges are less strict as your friend got a laptop because of unclear writing. I myself got a laptop and was allocated rest breaks in exams.

    With the above being said, I think it's very fair for you not to have a laptop in exams. How is it unfair that people with disabilities get laptops in exams over people like you who can write under timed conditions? :confused:

    *sigh*

    Edit: Oops, I just realised the date this thread was created, feel stupid now haha.
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    (Original post by balotelli12)
    You can type faster than you can write?
    Get out of here!
    Most can't.
    Oh and good luck with US spell checkers!
    They don't correct incorrect grammar either, as is clear in the above post.
    There is no spellchecker when using laptops in exams. You have to use notepad, not word, so there's no chance of formatting or anything.
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    I think it depends on whether your information is still legible. If it is not, then what benefit would there be from you writing by hand? Alternatively, if you can write legibly but it’s just a pain, chances are that you are stuck with writing by hand. I’d ask the teacher or the board.
 
 
 
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