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Could status in society be genetic? Watch

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    Ok, so it's a strange and unlikley idea, but hear me out. Also if you don't want to read the extra info just skip to the last paragraph.

    I've been to somewhere between 12 and 16 schools, I lost count some time ago. Four of those schools were secondary/high schools, one was a boarding school. Here's a list of things I've noticed about secondaries in particular:

    Every school has set groups which usually DO NOT consist of 'emo, jock, geek, rebel etc.'. Actually it's more like chavs (I don't mean that in a bad way it's the only word I can think of) and that includes some flirty boys - 20 %, boy group (like sports,beat each other up for fun etc.) - 35%, girl group (know everything about each other, talk about what went on at the weekend) -35%, clever people (not nessacerily cleverer than everyone else, just known for being so) 10% and 'individuals' which is what I call people who are known in the class for something i.e. being clever, being weird etc. They usually fit into another group as well.
    I'm not trying to be prejudiced here, this is just in my mind.

    The closer-knit a community is the more prejudiced it usually is, and less likely you are to fit in or to be accepted. Communities are usually closer together in urban areas because not many people move and less well-off areas for the same reason. Surprisingly schools in rural areas are generally more accepting because people move houses and schools more and so it's easier to be 'new'.

    And finally the point of this debate. No matter what school I'm at, I will be bullied or at best looked down on. It's a negative outlook, but after 16 schools I've pretty much given up hope on it getting any better. I've tried altering my appearance, my attitude, even my daily routine - essentially I've tried to become someone else (not as restricting as it sounds when it's likely you'll only be somewhere for the next 6 months anyway) but it never made any difference. And this is what I'm so interested in - if I try to change, are bits of my personality still 'leaking'? What's so wrong with my personality anyway? Am I giving off a chemical sign? My mum had exactly the same problem in school as did my gran, which is what made me wonder about genetics. Sure, it could just be how I was brought up, but why would you bring up your child to have the same problem you had? Surely you can't bring a child up like that completely by accident? Similarly I've seen people move somewhere and be part of a group in a matter of days, no prob, no fuss. :confused:

    So guys, what are your thoughts, do you think it's possible? It'd be interesting to know
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    (Original post by bebbybubbles99)
    Ok, so it's a strange and unlikley idea, but hear me out. Also if you don't want to read the extra info just skip to the last paragraph.

    I've been to somewhere between 12 and 16 schools, I lost count some time ago. Four of those schools were secondary/high schools, one was a boarding school. Here's a list of things I've noticed about secondaries in particular:

    Every school has set groups which usually DO NOT consist of 'emo, jock, geek, rebel etc.'. Actually it's more like chavs (I don't mean that in a bad way it's the only word I can think of) and that includes some flirty boys - 20 %, boy group (like sports,beat each other up for fun etc.) - 35%, girl group (know everything about each other, talk about what went on at the weekend) -35%, clever people (not nessacerily cleverer than everyone else, just known for being so) 10% and 'individuals' which is what I call people who are known in the class for something i.e. being clever, being weird etc. They usually fit into another group as well.
    I'm not trying to be prejudiced here, this is just in my mind.

    The closer-knit a community is the more prejudiced it usually is, and less likely you are to fit in or to be accepted. Communities are usually closer together in urban areas because not many people move and less well-off areas for the same reason. Surprisingly schools in rural areas are generally more accepting because people move houses and schools more and so it's easier to be 'new'.

    And finally the point of this debate. No matter what school I'm at, I will be bullied or at best looked down on. It's a negative outlook, but after 16 schools I've pretty much given up hope on it getting any better. I've tried altering my appearance, my attitude, even my daily routine - essentially I've tried to become someone else (not as restricting as it sounds when it's likely you'll only be somewhere for the next 6 months anyway) but it never made any difference. And this is what I'm so interested in - if I try to change, are bits of my personality still 'leaking'? What's so wrong with my personality anyway? Am I giving off a chemical sign? My mum had exactly the same problem in school as did my gran, which is what made me wonder about genetics. Sure, it could just be how I was brought up, but why would you bring up your child to have the same problem you had? Surely you can't bring a child up like that completely by accident? Similarly I've seen people move somewhere and be part of a group in a matter of days, no prob, no fuss. :confused:

    So guys, what are your thoughts, do you think it's possible? It'd be interesting to know
    Your 'genetics' are responsible for a huge number of your physical, psychological and emotional characteristics, and therefore I would say your proposition seems reasonable. I would not be surprised if someone undertook a study of how popular/ what position a father occupied in school compared to his son, or a mother compared to her daughter, that the two would be very similar. Still this is not necessarily the case, and it is entirely possible through force of will and action to change your position if you so choose. But generally people are more happy with being themselves, so that would be my suggestion. If people have a problem with who you are, then that is their shortcoming. If you are doing something avoidable that repels people (like swearing too much, being too confrontational) then that is something you may want to work on identifying and resolving.
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    I would go as far as to say that genetics could contribute to social divides via noticeable traits such as skin colour.
    However, genetics don't essentially set your specific societal roles or behavior. For example, in certain tribes in Madagascar and other places, women have a stereotypically 'male' dialect - heavy in swear words and direct-confrontation.
    Perhaps it would be best to thus conclude that 'noticeable' genetic traits help conscious and sub-conscious societal division based on already-established societal stereotypes.
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    (Original post by Pleonasm)
    Your 'genetics' are responsible for a huge number of your physical, psychological and emotional characteristics, and therefore I would say your proposition seems reasonable. I would not be surprised if someone undertook a study of how popular/ what position a father occupied in school compared to his son, or a mother compared to her daughter, that the two would be very similar. Still this is not necessarily the case, and it is entirely possible through force of will and action to change your position if you so choose. But generally people are more happy with being themselves, so that would be my suggestion. If people have a problem with who you are, then that is their shortcoming. If you are doing something avoidable that repels people (like swearing too much, being too confrontational) then that is something you may want to work on identifying and resolving.
    It would be interesting to do an investigation into whether this is the case and whether people actually do look up to thier parents as that would give a good outlook into whether it's genetics or choice. As for the other point you made I think I was for a while doing the opposite, i.e. being too withdrawn. Maybe I talked about my experience too much and made the point unclear because I was also talking about other people who were not in my situation. Still, thanks
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    (Original post by bebbybubbles99)
    It would be interesting to do an investigation into whether this is the case and whether people actually do look up to thier parents as that would give a good outlook into whether it's genetics or choice. As for the other point you made I think I was for a while doing the opposite, i.e. being too withdrawn. Maybe I talked about my experience too much and made the point unclear because I was also talking about other people who were not in my situation. Still, thanks
    Indeed. If you are still having trouble socially then I would recommend asking people about themselves and about their own hobbies. People generally love talking about themselves and what interests them. And through that it is easy to find people with similar interests to yourself. (which should be potential friends). You don't have to be the loudest person, or the most outspoken. Being a good listener can also go a long way.
 
 
 
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