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Wanna save three lives in less than an hour? Watch

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    Hi Everyone!

    I just thought I'd post something to try and encourage people who are eligible to donate blood, and to explain a bit about what the whole thing involves.


    Today was my third time donating blood (so far, twice when I was 17, and once when I was 18). When you arrive, they check your lname/DOB/address and get you to fill out a form asking if you are fit and well, if you've had any illnesses recently, if you've taken any medications recently, your sexual history and some other questions which are all listed here:
    http://www.blood.co.uk/can-i-give-bl...-health-check/

    You then have a quick chat with a nurse who asks you if you have any questions and also checks your iron levels in your blood. This is done by pricking your finger with a tiny needle and collecting a drop of blood and putting it in a machine. It's not particularly painful at all, just a quick nip, similar to what diabetes feel when they check their blood sugar numerous times per day, so nothing to complain about really.


    You then come to the actual donating part. They sit you on a reclining chair/bed type of thing and a nurse will wrap either an inflatable blood pressure cuff or a rubber band thing around the top of your arm to make your veins easier to see. They will then have a look/touch and work out which is the easiest vein to gain access to. They will then insert the needle in the vein. Although the needle is reasonably large, it's never been particularly painful for me at all - in fact today I hardly even felt it go in! They connect this all up to a couple of tubes that go away to be tested, and then to the bag which your precious life-saving blood will be stored in. It only takes around 8-15 min for them to collect the amount they need (just under a pint) and the nurse will hang around and chat to you during this time about the weather and other mundane things like that. They then disconnect the bag and remove the needle from your arm (again, almost painless for me, and over in less than a second). Just in case you faint, they leave you lying on the couch for about 5-10 minutes where you can go on your phone, listen to music, chat to the people there or whatever.


    Then, all being well, they let you go through to another area where you are given juice/coffee/tea/water to replenish some of the fluid you have lost, and a snack like biscuits or crisps or a Tunnock's tea cake to boost your blood sugar levels. The staff quite like you to stay there for about 10 min just to make sure that if you have an adverse reaction to donating (like feeling faint), they are there to help you.


    And then, you can leave and get on with your life knowing that you have potentially saved three lives!


    Afterwards, apparently is it not uncommon to feel a bit tired but this is not something I have experienced after any of my donations so far. They also advise that you don't do any strenuous exercise that day, and suggest that you drink lots of water and not skip meals. To be honest, this is an excellent excuse to lie around watching TV and eating chocolate hehe...


    There are many reasons why you might not be eligible to give blood (e.g. being under 17, not weighing enough, having low iron levels, travelling to certain countries, injecting drugs, certain sexual activities, like a man having sex with another men (personally I think this is ridiculous seeing as they check all blood for sexually transmitted diseases anyway, but let's not get into a discussion on that!!), and taking certain medications and having certain medical conditions).


    However, if you eligible to donate, I strongly suggest you do. It's a small price (only taking around an hour of you day, every 16 weeks) to pay to potentially save three lives. And just think, if you/your parent/your sibling/your partner/your friend were ill and in need of blood, you would surely accept. Therefore, if you have no real reason not to, I believe that people really should consider it. Whilst adverse reactions (fainting, bruising where the needle goes in etc.) do happen, you might be totally fine, and even if something does go wrong, the Blood Donation Staff are absolutely brilliant and so good at sorting people out.


    Wow that was a long posthumous, hopefully it has made a least one person considering giving blood for the first time, or to give again. Because if it has, then that's another 3 lives potentially saved .


    Some good videos giving more persuasion/information:


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9Lyt...e_gdata_player

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2092...e_gdata_player


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CsOx...e_gdata_player


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFeEX...e_gdata_player


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XJkD8...e_gdata_player
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    Im kinda curios why this got a neg rep...elaborate please!
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    I really like the idea.. but the problem is I think I would throw up in seeing how much blood has been lost from my body.

    Is there any way to overcome this? I mean even now my heart is thumping hard just thinking about it.

    It's quite scary.
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    (Original post by Lord Frieza)
    I really like the idea.. but the problem is I think I would throw up in seeing how much blood has been lost from my body.

    Is there any way to overcome this? I mean even now my heart is thumping hard just thinking about it.

    It's quite scary.

    When I did it you couldn't really see the blood collection thingy from where I was sitting, only if you really peered to look. If you just avoid looking in that general direction then it might help.
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    Can't do it. Good cause though.
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    saving three lives requires a lot of blood.
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    (Original post by Short Story Long)
    When I did it you couldn't really see the blood collection thingy from where I was sitting, only if you really peered to look. If you just avoid looking in that general direction then it might help.

    Is it possible to start with a smaller quantity?
    I'm compelled to help life, but I don't know if I'm ready, and I think a pint is too much ><
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    I would love to donate blood as my mum has but I'm a diabetic so if I don't know if I can cause I inject insulin. I actually kinda like having bloods test because they are proper experts at it so do it first time.
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    (Original post by madders94)
    Can't do it. Good cause though.
    What's your excuse?
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    (Original post by Sphodromantis)
    What's your excuse?
    Major surgery as a baby requiring a blood transfusion, currently undergoing medical tests and iron deficiency anaemia. Take your pick would love to be able to; especially seeing as I'm fine with blood tests etc.
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    (Original post by madders94)
    Major surgery as a baby requiring a blood transfusion, currently undergoing medical tests and iron deficiency anaemia. Take your pick would love to be able to; especially seeing as I'm fine with blood tests etc.
    damn talk about being selfish ay? :ahee:
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    tldr
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    Sorry. Would never give blood as I don't agree with it. And before you say this I would not accept it either


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    (Original post by yaboy)
    damn talk about being selfish ay? :ahee:
    I know, I can't live with myself :teehee:
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    (Original post by madders94)
    Major surgery as a baby requiring a blood transfusion, currently undergoing medical tests and iron deficiency anaemia. Take your pick would love to be able to; especially seeing as I'm fine with blood tests etc.
    Oh that's bad, but remember to take your meds! lol
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    I can't do it. Would love it but, no.
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    (Original post by Ben Kenobi)
    saving three lives requires a lot of blood.

    Just got that figure from the blood donation people, who told me that the amount of blood they take from you is enough to save three premature babies, which I would say count as three people!
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    (Original post by ConfusedMedic)
    Hi Everyone!

    I just thought I'd post something to try and encourage people who are eligible to donate blood, and to explain a bit about what the whole thing involves.


    Today was my third time donating blood (so far, twice when I was 17, and once when I was 18). When you arrive, they check your lname/DOB/address and get you to fill out a form asking if you are fit and well, if you've had any illnesses recently, if you've taken any medications recently, your sexual history and some other questions which are all listed here:
    http://www.blood.co.uk/can-i-give-bl...-health-check/

    You then have a quick chat with a nurse who asks you if you have any questions and also checks your iron levels in your blood. This is done by pricking your finger with a tiny needle and collecting a drop of blood and putting it in a machine. It's not particularly painful at all, just a quick nip, similar to what diabetes feel when they check their blood sugar numerous times per day, so nothing to complain about really.


    You then come to the actual donating part. They sit you on a reclining chair/bed type of thing and a nurse will wrap either an inflatable blood pressure cuff or a rubber band thing around the top of your arm to make your veins easier to see. They will then have a look/touch and work out which is the easiest vein to gain access to. They will then insert the needle in the vein. Although the needle is reasonably large, it's never been particularly painful for me at all - in fact today I hardly even felt it go in! They connect this all up to a couple of tubes that go away to be tested, and then to the bag which your precious life-saving blood will be stored in. It only takes around 8-15 min for them to collect the amount they need (just under a pint) and the nurse will hang around and chat to you during this time about the weather and other mundane things like that. They then disconnect the bag and remove the needle from your arm (again, almost painless for me, and over in less than a second). Just in case you faint, they leave you lying on the couch for about 5-10 minutes where you can go on your phone, listen to music, chat to the people there or whatever.


    Then, all being well, they let you go through to another area where you are given juice/coffee/tea/water to replenish some of the fluid you have lost, and a snack like biscuits or crisps or a Tunnock's tea cake to boost your blood sugar levels. The staff quite like you to stay there for about 10 min just to make sure that if you have an adverse reaction to donating (like feeling faint), they are there to help you.


    And then, you can leave and get on with your life knowing that you have potentially saved three lives!


    Afterwards, apparently is it not uncommon to feel a bit tired but this is not something I have experienced after any of my donations so far. They also advise that you don't do any strenuous exercise that day, and suggest that you drink lots of water and not skip meals. To be honest, this is an excellent excuse to lie around watching TV and eating chocolate hehe...


    There are many reasons why you might not be eligible to give blood (e.g. being under 17, not weighing enough, having low iron levels, travelling to certain countries, injecting drugs, certain sexual activities, like a man having sex with another men (personally I think this is ridiculous seeing as they check all blood for sexually transmitted diseases anyway, but let's not get into a discussion on that!!), and taking certain medications and having certain medical conditions).


    However, if you eligible to donate, I strongly suggest you do. It's a small price (only taking around an hour of you day, every 16 weeks) to pay to potentially save three lives. And just think, if you/your parent/your sibling/your partner/your friend were ill and in need of blood, you would surely accept. Therefore, if you have no real reason not to, I believe that people really should consider it. Whilst adverse reactions (fainting, bruising where the needle goes in etc.) do happen, you might be totally fine, and even if something does go wrong, the Blood Donation Staff are absolutely brilliant and so good at sorting people out.


    Wow that was a long posthumous, hopefully it has made a least one person considering giving blood for the first time, or to give again. Because if it has, then that's another 3 lives potentially saved .


    Some good videos giving more persuasion/information:


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9Lyt...e_gdata_player

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2092...e_gdata_player


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CsOx...e_gdata_player


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFeEX...e_gdata_player


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XJkD8...e_gdata_player
    Are they the ones who give you juice and biscuits?
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    Good post. But I myself can't give blood because I'm under 50kg.
    But I am an organ donor though, I feel like that's just as important
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    I've done it twice so far, I was convinced for ages you had to be over 18 to do it and then when I found out that was rubbish I was 17 but I couldn't find any sessions near where I lived Did it a couple of weeks into uni, then 4 months after, I'm wayyyyy behind now. Going to do it when I get back to uni, there aren't any sessions at home before I go back, I just need to find out my lecture timetable because all the donations at uni are on a Monday, pretty much. Nearly passed out the first time, weirdest feeling ever. I was really really tired though, slept for ages after. I was fine the second time though. My Granny needed a heap of blood a while back so I'm glad I did it, I'm not scared of needles so it doesn't bother me at all but there's heaps of people who aren't eligible, if I lose weight they won't let me, because I'm short-ish so I wouldn't have enough blood. They nearly didn't let me the second time round because my iron levels were pretty low. So many people are scared of needles though, there should really be a mass thing to help people with needle phobia, not because of blood donation but because it can really get in the way of people getting immunised and those vaccines protect us against some really awful stuff. I'm not judging, it's a pretty legitimate fear
 
 
 
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