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I plan on homeschooling my children Watch

  • View Poll Results: Is home schooling beneficial?
    Yes
    9.80%
    It depends on the child
    26.14%
    No
    64.05%

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    Everyone who's against homeschooling should be put in an unsupervised prison for their social benefit.
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    (Original post by macromicro)
    honestly feel sorry for kids who are home-schooled and look down on parents who do.

    School is a social experience as much as an educational one.
    I look down on parents who dump the education of their children on the state.
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    (Original post by rupertj)
    I'm halfway in - as someone else pointed out, 'masterpiece' might be a luttle over-the-top, although that individual most likely isn't qualified to say so, having not read it.
    I've read it.


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    (Original post by LexiswasmyNexis)
    I've read it.


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    Forgive me then, for being dismissive. What did you think of it?
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    (Original post by rupertj)
    Forgive me then, for being dismissive. What did you think of it?
    To be honest I did find it interesting- it provided an insight into societal values at the time and showed who was 'in control'.

    I'm not so sure it can teach us much of value practically about 'today' though (for the reasons I outlined earlier).

    A more theoretical undertaking examining whether those themes are really still operative now would be interesting.

    Yet I still don't think it provides much to do with the home schooling debate beyond what I describe above.


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    (Original post by Iron Lady)
    I look down on parents who dump the education of their children on the state.
    It isn't dumping, though, is it.


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    (Original post by Iron Lady)
    I look down on parents who dump the education of their children on the state.
    Out of curiosity, would you be shelling out for all the tutors or do you feel capable of teaching them yourself? I've only ever heard of a few people being homeschooled and it's people that didn't mix with school well at all. People that rarely bothered to attend I mean.

    I wouldn't be surprised if a child quickly begins to question why any friends they manage to make go to school and they stay at home.
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    (Original post by rupertj)
    I think that, irrespective of the forces at work (or not), when
    Gatto's findings are combined with the findings on the impacts of modern schooling from sociology (Foucault et al.), neuroscience (on 'creativity') and child development, you can see that the effects are the same, even if the forces are not consciously working towards it. Indeed, Gatto points out that once the structure has been sustained for a generation or two, it becomes self-sustaining, i.e. you dont need people managing it with malevolent intent.

    The typical school experience that Gatto describes is certainly one that I sympathise with, which is what turned me to research the subject, where I encountered the traditional Islamic education, then Dorothy Sayers and so forth.
    I don't dispute that; I do dispute the utility in using the work as justification for completely leaving the system. I don't see how that alternative is any better.


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    (Original post by s24a)
    i have to say i'm not home schooled, but i do agree with everything that OP has said. It makes sense. The only thing that i dont agree with is the idea that children will not strive to be the best because of their friends. I dont agree with this being a valid reason for not sending your child to school, because i think that kids should actually experiance the effect that peers can have on their education. Otherwise when your children get to 18+ and perhaps go to university, they will have little to no idea about how to cope with friends who perhaps are distracting them during lectures etc. As children get older they are able to develop ways of distancing themselves from distracting peers etc, because they have developed these skills over the 13/14 year education they have previously had in school, and therefore when a situation arises where they are being "kept back" from peers, they have a little more experience in knowing how to distance themselves, without being "pushed out" of their friendship group or whatever.
    Also i think that home schooling isnt good because it doesnt not allow a child to experience authority that isn't from their own parents or a tutor. This is crucial because it will give children experience and knowledge about how to act around authority that perhaps are not as lenient as a parent.
    I agree with this point.
    Home schooling is fine, i dont have anything against it, but i personally wouldnt home school my children.
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    I think it depends on the person in question. Shy children might benefit, but I'm an extrovert by nature and I wouldn't have been able to stand it. Plus I think I really needed the competition with other students, it helped me to work harder.
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    There are good aspects and bad aspects to it. But the key bad one is that you're never going to actually know enough to properly teach your child every aspect of the curriculum in the same way that several different teachers, each of whom specialise in a specific subject can.
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    Self-educating a child, in my opinion, would be tantamount to a form of negligence in developing independence, social awareness and 'real life' (there are exceptions of course). School presents so much opportunity to make friends as well as engage in extracurricular activities that not only give depth to a CV or a UCAS application, but to the person them self. I think the fact that you encounter so many diverse people who are all essentially going through the same process as you can only be a good thing. Yes there may well be contemptible people - and teachers - but I would argue that only helps to strengthen a persons character. School along with sport (which of course you don't need to attend school to participate in) has built my confidence and I personally feel that if I had been home schooled, I would have felt isolated and questioned why I was different to other children/teenagers who went to school. A worry may also be that the child would be 'cotton wooled' (though I am in no way suggesting that would be the case). Also, I know in my case, that space away from parents is a good thing as otherwise I would have been driven up the wall which could lead to resentment. Of course this is all theoretical and my personal opinion.


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    I agree that for some children school can be a place that diminishes their self confidence and self image. My son is on the autistic spectrum. He is year 9 and I have seen his self image deteriorate since year 2 due to social exclusion and verbal bullying. Even though he is about to start his gcse options I am considering part or home schooling as he is so unhappy. I have lost confidence in schools to seriously appreciate the effects of bullying on the victims. My son has felt that he has been diminished by teachers for example his music teacher couldn't remember his name and called him lankey.
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    There are many state school teachers with radical political agendas, and I think any parent who wants to protect their children from this should be applauded.
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    (Original post by #Ridwan)
    There are many state school teachers with radical political agendas, and I think any parent who wants to protect their children from this should be applauded.
    Evidence? Or are we just wildly extrapolating from the dubious findings of the 'trojan horse' investigations.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Evidence? Or are we just wildly extrapolating from the dubious findings of the 'trojan horse' investigations.
    Islamic extremism is a problem but radical feminism is far bigger. I made a thread about this a couple of days ago.

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2728356
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    If I never went to school I would never have met any of my best friends and got to spend most of my childhood around people I love having fun - the thought of taking that away from a child horrifies me

    Ps also OP most kids get on just fine at school, I can tell you were one of the ones who didn't


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    (Original post by #Ridwan)
    There are many state school teachers with radical political agendas, and I think any parent who wants to protect their children from this should be applauded.
    Didn't you do a PGCE?

    Do you have any radical political agendas?
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Didn't you do a PGCE?

    Do you have any radical political agendas?
    Absolutely not.
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    i think home schooling is great. but home schooling ONLY? i think thats bad for children's social development. even if you took your kid out of school during lessons and let them share the playground they'd still miss out on key social skills. i remember learning so many things socially about covert and sophisticated communication in class. socialising in a learning environment and how things would progress through out the day. like how things might kick off in the playground but you have to keep a lid on it in the class room.

    i also dont think after school clubs adequately prepare you socially. dont remember learning on how to deal with any conflict or emotional situations in after school clubs.

    but i think a mix of home school & school is perfect.
 
 
 
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