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Who is your favourite philosopher? watch

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    Do you have a favourite philosopher? If so, who is it and why?

    Do they have a particular quote that resonates with you?

    My favourite is Bertrand Russell.

    (Original post by Bertrand Russell)
    I would never die for my beliefs because I might be wrong.
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    Imanuel Kant. Morals can be devised from reason. Ask yourself, if everyone did this what would the world be like?
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    JS Mill for me.
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    (Original post by miser)
    My favourite is Bertrand Russell.

    (Original post by Bertrand Russell)
    I would never die for my beliefs because I might be wrong.
    The above quote is so true :love:
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    Sartre or Camus.
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    Sartre or Nietzsche. I love me some existentialism.
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    ...gaze into the abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.
    Nietzsche
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    HHhhmmm, at the moment I'd say my favourites go in this order:
    Wittgenstein.
    Mill.
    Butler.
    G.E. Moore. Even if I didn't agree or like the style of writing. It was a good theory for knowledge/common sense. Just slightly missing the point it wanted to make.
    De Beauvoir (yeah, I can't spell her name...)
    Sartre.
    Foucault.
    Bentham.
    Singer.

    Wittgenstein quote, that I think deals with a lot of On Certainty:
    Spoiler:
    Show

    24. The idealist's question would be something like: "What right have I not to doubt the existence of my hands?" (And to that the answer can't be: I know that they exist.) But someone who asks such a question is overlooking the fact that a doubt about existence only works in a language-game. Hence, that we should first have to ask: what would such a doubt be like?, and don't understand this straight off.
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    Kant.
    Socrates.
    Nietzsche.
    Daniel Dennett.


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    (Original post by miser)
    Do you have a favourite philosopher? If so, who is it and why?

    Do they have a particular quote that resonates with you?

    My favourite is Bertrand Russell.
    John Stuart Mill
    Noam Chomsky
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    Rousseau
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    Nietzsche, then Spinoza
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    Kant, for his takes on moral and science. No particular favourite quote. I do like the stroll thing though.
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    Marx
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    Socrates!

    All I am sure I know is that I know nothing!
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    philosoraptor
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    (Original post by PostgradMatt)
    Imanuel Kant. Morals can be devised from reason. Ask yourself, if everyone did this what would the world be like?
    Like Christianity? Kant's moral imperative was like a Christian 'thou shalt'.
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    Mill. Gets to the point of his noble arguments without the pretentious rhetorical crap that Kant, Nietzsche and others are famous for.

    Haven't read much of him yet but Voltaire seems good also, and Chomsky too.
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    (Original post by Tuerin)
    Mill. Gets to the point of his noble arguments without the pretentious rhetorical crap that Kant, Nietzsche and others are famous for.

    Haven't read much of him yet but Voltaire seems good also, and Chomsky too.
    Nietzche blieved that Mill's philosophy was ignoble and vulgar.

    "Against John Stuart Mill.— I abhor his vulgarity, which says: "what is right for one is fair for another"; "what you would not, etc., do not unto others"; which wants to establish all human intercourse on the basis of mutual services, so that every action appears as a kind of payment for something done to us. The presupposition here is ignoble in the lowest sense: here an equivalence of value between my actions and yours is presupposed; here the most personal value of an action is simply annulled (that which cannot be balanced or paid in any way"
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    Overall I'd have to say Hume. I also really like the ideas of David Velleman, who's a contemporary philosopher.
 
 
 
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