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I'm afraid I have to leave the Ed Balls Appreciation Society Watch

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    I watched him on BBC News earlier on. Being part of this society offends me too much.

    Goodbye.
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    I find it unlikely you were a member, given what we see of your posts elsewhere.

    I also find him very irritating, but I kind of have to grudgingly admit to being impressed by his sheer indifference to incoming salvoes and determination (albeit somewhat haphazard determination) to spew out the pre-prepared invective he has chosen to batter Osborne with on any given day in Parliament. I watched part of his debate on the Budget today and his ineptitude was quite funny at times, but the way he kept going, despite everyone laughing at him (even on his own side) was in a way rather admirable.

    One of the best jokes about him came from Michael Howard, some years ago, when he was questioning the latest Gordon Brown pronouncement - suspecting it was not written by Brown in person, but by a certain prominent assistant of his, he said "frankly Mr Speaker, that statement by the Chancellor was a load of complete Balls".
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    I find it unlikely you were a member, given what we see of your posts elsewhere.

    I also find him very irritating, but I kind of have to grudgingly admit to being impressed by his sheer indifference to incoming salvoes and determination (albeit somewhat haphazard determination) to spew out the pre-prepared invective he has chosen to batter Osborne with on any given day in Parliament. I watched part of his debate on the Budget today and his ineptitude was quite funny at times, but the way he kept going, despite everyone laughing at him (even on his own side) was in a way rather admirable.

    One of the best jokes about him came from Michael Howard, some years ago, when he was questioning the latest Gordon Brown pronouncement - suspecting it was not written by Brown in person, but by a certain prominent assistant of his, he said "frankly Mr Speaker, that statement by the Chancellor was a load of complete Balls".
    Haha, I didn't see that exchange, and YouTube doesn't appear to have a clip of it. By the way, I joined the society on here as a joke. (I'm sad :sadface:).
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    I don't understand why there is a fan club/society/Social Group on this individual. This is a guy who who was closely associated with the economic failures and his plans would cause more failures
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    (Original post by Morgsie)
    I don't understand why there is a fan club/society/Social Group on this individual. This is a guy who who was closely associated with the economic failures and his plans would cause more failures
    One assumes that the very existence of the society is intended as ironic.
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    (Original post by Iron Lady)
    I watched him on BBC News earlier on. Being part of this society offends me too much.

    Goodbye.
    I'm staying Still wish he was leader though.

    (Original post by Morgsie)
    I don't understand why there is a fan club/society/Social Group on this individual. This is a guy who who was closely associated with the economic failures and his plans would cause more failures
    Gives me a chance to show this...

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    (Original post by meenu89)
    I'm staying Still wish he was leader though.



    Gives me a chance to show this...

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    I actually think that Balls is quite decent...
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    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    I actually think that Balls is quite decent...
    I agree, he's actually a very intelligent man and he called it 100% in 2010 on how the current Tory policy would effect the economy.

    The only people still making childish jokes about "Two Eds" and slating Ed Balls are usually economic illiterates and those completely out of touch with the fact that the Tory party is despised in the country.
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    (Original post by MostUncivilised)
    I agree, he's actually a very intelligent man and he called it 100% in 2010 on how the current Tory policy would effect the economy.

    The only people still making childish jokes about "Two Eds" and slating Ed Balls are usually economic illiterates and those completely out of touch with the fact that the Tory party is despised in the country.
    The Conservative Party is despised by the following:

    * Champagne socialists, the Guardian readers (middle to upper middle classes). They are the types who complain about capitalism, from their comfortable house in a nice area, or in coffee shops from the Apple Macs, do I need to call hypocrisy?
    * The people who the cuts are affecting: those on benefits or living in council estates. They have been allowed to rely on the state for generations and only now are we beginning to crack down on it and it seems harsh to them, but it is unsustainable if we allow it to continue. I would just like to add that I support a welfare state, but not an over-inflated one, it needs to be there as a safety-net, that is all.
    * Students. Either middle class students, or "under-privileged students" (:rolleyes: - only because they create their own problems. Education is free!), complaining about cuts to EMA when they should have known how poorly implemented it was. Or how the latter what everything handed to them on a plate. For the record, I sympathise with them if they come from poor backgrounds, but that is not an excuse in itself, they should stop blaming "society".
    * Healthcare professionals - those who support the nanny state.

    OK, I have really gone off the topic. But the following people like the Conservatives:

    * Business people in the private sector. The types who want to be left alone and create their own wealth.
    * Hard-working individuals. You know, the type who doesn't claim jobs are beneath them, gets up and goes out there to improve their situation.
    * Conservative Future (obviously) - but it is a growing base with libertarians and it shows that the Conservatives are not universally hated by young people.
    * Traditional families with moral values. I hope this isn't offensive but Labour are too kind to teenage mothers, etc.
    * Property owners.
    * The law-abiding citizen, who wants more discipline and criminal activity to stop.
    * The importance of freedom from the state.

    I am sure there are others, but in a nutshell, these are the people who traditionally support the Conservatives. The current Chancellor is not great but he is not reflective of the party as a whole. The above principles make the party and it is only a matter of time before it is restored to its former self.

    So no, it's not despised, it's only made to look that way due to the left-wing bias from the BBC and the Guardian.

    Also, I would like to point out that saying you shouldn't spend your way out of a recession, shouldn't tax people more than they deserve, or make government cuts, does not mean you're an "economic illiterate". It just means you're not convinced by Keynesian economics.
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    (Original post by MostUncivilised)
    I agree, he's actually a very intelligent man and he called it 100% in 2010 on how the current Tory policy would effect the economy.
    Unfortunately he also co-operated with Gordon Brown in a massive surge in spending, starting in 2006/7, that was basically unaffordable. The blame appears to lie mainly with Brown, who was seeking to spend his way to victory with the electorate, but as he allegedly leaned heavily on Balls and they were bosom pals, it probably is reasonable of the Tories to repeatedly attack Balls for the scale of the deficit. Spending really raced ahead in 08/9 as a result of the financial collapse and an abrupt drop in tax revenues, but it was structurally unsound before that.

    The other thing about Balls is all the games he played when in No 11 - he was one of the key briefers against Blair and a constant attack dog for Brown, neither proved to be really sound positions to take - Brown wasn't a better PM than Blair by any stretch and he actually wasn't that great as a Chancellor, despite all the hype at the time. To my mind, these things point a finger at fatal weaknesses in Ed Balls, which are not contradicted by what we see of his performances in public.

    It's a great shame that Milliband hasn't gone for Alistair Darling as Shadow Chancellor, he appears to be a far more competent, measured and clever man.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Unfortunately he also co-operated with Gordon Brown in a massive surge in spending
    ...
    The other thing about Balls is all the games he played when in No 11 - he was one of the key briefers against Blair and a constant attack dog for Brown, neither proved to be really sound positions to take
    I don't think any of this has any basis in fact. It is just a bunch of hearsay which people can't verify and has no real relevance to today's economic debate.

    It's a great shame that Milliband hasn't gone for Alistair Darling as Shadow Chancellor, he appears to be a far more competent, measured and clever man.
    I think AD has had enough of front bench politics for personal reasons. I was on a campaign event with him just before the last general election and he looked awful - droopy eyes, crinkled suit, not really fussed about the election.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Unfortunately he also co-operated with Gordon Brown in a massive surge in spending, starting in 2006/7, that was basically unaffordable. The blame appears to lie mainly with Brown, who was seeking to spend his way to victory with the electorate, but as he allegedly leaned heavily on Balls and they were bosom pals, it probably is reasonable of the Tories to repeatedly attack Balls for the scale of the deficit. Spending really raced ahead in 08/9 as a result of the financial collapse and an abrupt drop in tax revenues, but it was structurally unsound before that.

    The other thing about Balls is all the games he played when in No 11 - he was one of the key briefers against Blair and a constant attack dog for Brown, neither proved to be really sound positions to take - Brown wasn't a better PM than Blair by any stretch and he actually wasn't that great as a Chancellor, despite all the hype at the time. To my mind, these things point a finger at fatal weaknesses in Ed Balls, which are not contradicted by what we see of his performances in public.

    It's a great shame that Milliband hasn't gone for Alistair Darling as Shadow Chancellor, he appears to be a far more competent, measured and clever man.
    Well said

    But don't forget spending rose from around 2001!

    The loss we made from Brown selling our Gold at rock bottom prices! It would have been a good few billion that could have been raised during 2008-2012!

    And the Olympics budget - how does £2.4 billion turn into £9.3 billion in only 7 years!

    Not even property prices move that quickly lool!

    Alistair Darling had funny eyebrows but he was quite competent coompared to most front bencher's for labour

    And I'm glad that awfully sneaky Mandelson is no longer in power!
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    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    I don't think any of this has any basis in fact. It is just a bunch of hearsay which people can't verify and has no real relevance to today's economic debate.
    There's so much on it that it can't possibly be just dismissed - I suggest reading Andrew Rawnsley's books on the subject - note that nobody sued him. The best adjectives that can be applied to Balls from that period are probably 'disgraceful', 'scheming' and 'ruthless'. I'm leaving out 'servile', although that may actually be a good description of his relationship with Brown.

    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    I think AD has had enough of front bench politics for personal reasons. I was on a campaign event with him just before the last general election and he looked awful - droopy eyes, crinkled suit, not really fussed about the election.
    He'd just gone through the worst financial crisis for 60 years - is that surprising? He must have been exhausted! He looks fine on TV now. Although I can easily imagine him not wanting to serve alongside some of them, given how they behaved towards him when he was doing that terribly difficult job.
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    (Original post by a729)
    Well said

    But don't forget spending rose from around 2001!

    The loss we made from Brown selling our Gold at rock bottom prices! It would have been a good few billion that could have been raised during 2008-2012!

    And the Olympics budget - how does £2.4 billion turn into £9.3 billion in only 7 years!

    Not even property prices move that quickly lool!

    Alistair Darling had funny eyebrows but he was quite competent coompared to most front bencher's for labour

    And I'm glad that awfully sneaky Mandelson is no longer in power!
    Most of those points are silly, but the gold thing is exaggerated - the UK was acting in accordance with an agreement with other leading gold-holding countries and the sales were co-ordinated. They make no sense from today's perspective, but that was then and now is now. At that time, Sterling and the Euro looked unbeatably strong. The good old days, lol.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    One of the best jokes about him came from Michael Howard, some years ago, when he was questioning the latest Gordon Brown pronouncement - suspecting it was not written by Brown in person, but by a certain prominent assistant of his, he said "frankly Mr Speaker, that statement by the Chancellor was a load of complete Balls".
    It was Michael Heseline actually, and the quote was "It's not Brown's, it's Balls!" Tory party conference, 1994.
    Still funny though - here's the Youtube
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    (Original post by Morgsie)
    I don't understand why there is a fan club/society/Social Group on this individual. This is a guy who who was closely associated with the economic failures and his plans would cause more failures
    Statistically it's possible for there to exist some people stupid enough to hold such opinions.

    One can only hope that the people don't elect Ed n Ed at the next election.
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    Balls is ideal in opposition, as his scrutiny tactics are excellent. You need someone with a bit of backbone and he has it. However. I wouldn't want to live next door to him...
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    Ed Balls is a ****ing joke. He is economically illiterate. Labour are ****ing idiots.
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    (Original post by Pastaferian)
    It was Michael Heseline actually, and the quote was "It's not Brown's, it's Balls!" Tory party conference, 1994.
    Still funny though - here's the Youtube
    Oh, OK, thanks! :blush:
 
 
 
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