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Why are GP receptionists so rude yet compassion is instilled in other healthcare staf Watch

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    (Original post by anonymouspie227)
    The receptionist at my surgery was kinda mean. I was asking to book an appointment with my doctor to discuss test results, and she told me the results at the desk without my permission, in front of all the other patients. (it wasn't an sexual illness test, it was just some bloods and an xray) After telling me thee results she said I don't need an appointment anymore. I felt embarrassed, all the patients queuing up behind me were listening and I just walked out.
    That's wrong and the Receptionist shouldn't have done that. You should put a letter of complaint in to the practice manager. Patient confidentiality and discretion is no.1 priority within the practice. Appalling.
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    I've wondered this. I find them really off-putting. They always make me feel like I've done something wrong, even if I'm just booking an appointment or picking up a repeat prescription. There's something about their manner.

    Of course, that's just for the ones I've seen anyway.
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    Well receptionist don't really need to build a good rapport with you so compassion isn't an important part of their job
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    That's wrong and the Receptionist shouldn't have done that. You should put a letter of complaint in to the practice manager. Patient confidentiality and discretion is no.1 priority within the practice. Appalling.
    I was planning on complaining, but I was too worried.
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    (Original post by A5ko)
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    Don't get me started on ones that have the gall to ask you why you want to see a GP. They get it in the neck from me every time.
    Its a standard question aimed at a) giving the GP a heads up of what they're about to deal with and b) to make sure it wouldn't be more appropriate to see a nurse e.g. for vaccines and c) check its not something they should go to A&E for, which honestly is the case more often than you'd think. Obviously you can tell them you wish to keep it private.

    You are the one "not understanding" here i'm afraid.

    (Original post by OU Student)
    Just because it's not life threatening, doesn't mean it's not something that's urgent.
    What? That doesn't mean the GP shouldn't prioritise! The fact is, some things are more important that others. Imagine how you'd feel if you were very ill and 20 repeat prescription patients took all the appointments before you did.
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    (Original post by anonymouspie227)
    I was planning on complaining, but I was too worried.
    You shouldn't be worried about complaining. If anything the practice manager would actually back you because s/he knows the receptionist is in the wrong. That receptionist would then be spoken to and warned not to do such a thing again. I've had patients come up to me on the front desk asking for their results (with patients waiting), and I always give them the phone to speak to the results lady (reception team don't give results). That way only the patient and the results lady have had the conversation, it was between the two of them, I know nothing and patient confidentiality and discretion has been carried out.
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    (Original post by nexttime)

    What? That doesn't mean the GP shouldn't prioritise! The fact is, some things are more important that others. Imagine how you'd feel if you were very ill and 20 repeat prescription patients took all the appointments before you did.
    Where I am, repeat prescription patients don't need to see their GP, unless it's for a review. Same at where I was before.

    I don't wish to disclose to the receptionist why I want to see a GP. It's private.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    Its a standard question aimed at a) giving the GP a heads up of what they're about to deal with and b) to make sure it wouldn't be more appropriate to see a nurse e.g. for vaccines and c) check its not something they should go to A&E for, which honestly is the case more often than you'd think. Obviously you can tell them you wish to keep it private. And you wander why they are rude back to you? You are the one "not understanding" here i'm afraid. Sort your attitude out.
    Thank you for this - when you try to explain to patients, they just don't wanna know.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    I don't wish to disclose to the receptionist why I want to see a GP. It's private.
    Then don't. But realise that they are doing their job - no need to come on a web forum to complain about it.
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    Compassion doesn't really come into it. Surely it's bog-standard customer-service that's the problem here. Funnily enough, you'd never expect to walk into a bank or business and expect anything other than a kind smiling and helpful 'front of house' receptionist, so why should it be any different with GP surgeries? I guess the difference is that in one situation they're pleased to see you walk through the door, and in the other, they're a lot less enthusiastic seeing you heave your hypochondriac ass through the doorstep for the third time in a month.

    Oh, and you're a bit thick if you think receptionists shouldn't ask you what you want to see the GP for.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    Then don't. But realise that they are doing their job - no need to come on a web forum to complain about it.
    But then that means I can't get an urgent appointment when it's something that needs to be sorted now and not the end of April.
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    (Original post by nosaer)

    Oh, and you're a bit thick if you think receptionists shouldn't ask you what you want to see the GP for.
    Why? it's none of their business. That's between me and the GP.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    Then don't. But realise that they are doing their job - no need to come on a web forum to complain about it.
    Agree.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    But then that means I can't get an urgent appointment when it's something that needs to be sorted now and not the end of April.
    OU Student - at your GP practice, can you not request a 'ring back' from the Dr? That way, you're not disclosing what it is you wish to talk to the Dr about with the receptionist??
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    There tends to be a mix but from my experience there is at least one awful dragon and I've moved about a bit. I think if you are demanding to be seen on that day then they have a good reason to be perhaps forceful as they need to try and see people urgently who do need to be seen urgently. However, if you are just booking the next available appointment they should be friendly and polite and there is no excuse to be curt or harshly enquiring. I have to deal with **** all the time from clients. And think of people who work in call centres on minimum wage, they don't get away with being obnoxious.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    Why? it's none of their business. That's between me and the GP.
    Because for all they know, your problem could have been that you've overdosed for example, but instead of either directing you towards A+E pronto or letting the doctor know ASAP, you'd be sitting there in the waiting room for an hour, with your pride in tact but in all eventuality, probably dead or seriously ill by the time your name is called up.

    You can tell the GP about all the STDs,warts or snotty noses you want when you're in the privacy of his room, but the receptionist needs to know what to flash up on the docs computer screen and to triage as necessary. Doubt they give a hoot what embarrassing ailment you've dragged in through the doors.
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    (Original post by nosaer)
    Because for all they know, your problem could have been that you've overdosed for example, but instead of either directing you towards A+E pronto or letting the doctor know ASAP, you'd be sitting there in the waiting room for an hour, with your pride in tact but in all eventuality, probably dead or seriously ill by the time your name is called up.

    You can tell the GP about all the STDs,warts or snotty noses you want when you're in the privacy of his room, but the receptionist needs to know what to flash up on the docs computer screen and to triage as necessary. Doubt they give a hoot what embarrassing ailment you've dragged in through the doors.
    Spot on nosaer!
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    It's not rude to ask why you want to see a doctor - it's to make sure they make you an appointment with the right person, sometimes a nurse is more appropriate. You can talk to them in private if you want.
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    I don't understand the question
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    All NHS receptionists seem to be ... curt. I know that this may be because quite a few of the patients are hard to deal with but it makes the rest of us feel like ****.
 
 
 
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