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My G.P is dangerously useless Watch

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    I admit some doctors can be a bit sketchy but the vast majority are very good.

    Bad experiences with doctors:
    Had a lump on my forehead, went to the doctor and all she did was poke it and ask if I prayed
    Had anxiety attacks, doctor prescribed me beta-blockers, I told her I had a low hear rate, she told me to take them anyway. I didn't take them.

    Good experiences with doctors
    Went to another doctor about the lump. She looked at it and told me it was just fatty tissue
    Went to another doctor about the anxiety attacks. he agreed with me that beta blockers were overkill especially for someone with brachycardia.

    That is why OP needs to learn about "second opinion"
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    (Original post by SR255)
    I admit some doctors can be a bit sketchy but the vast majority are very good.

    Bad experiences with doctors:
    Had a lump on my forehead, went to the doctor and all she did was poke it and ask if I prayed
    What the...? They're not meant to force their views on to you like that.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    What the...? They're not meant to force their views on to you like that.
    I don't think (correct me if I'm wrong) that she was saying that he should pray - Muslims can get lesions on their foreheads from the position they assume when praying, so she could have been seeing if that was a potential cause
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    I think commonwealth medical school are constrained in the amount of knowledge they can give to their students in 5 or 6 years, Those that have honors in a hard or soft sciences and a medical degree are equipped with adequete knowledge.
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    (Original post by nothepreacher)
    I think commonwealth medical school are constrained in the amount of knowledge they can give to their students in 5 or 6 years, Those that have honors in a hard or soft sciences and a medical degree are equipped with adequete knowledge.
    Funny thing is that in Canada you do a bachelors degree then your medical degree, then 3 years family medicine training. Which is the same time as it takes in the UK, in some case less time. Only difference is they spend less time learning medicine. The vast majority of your medical knowledge comes from postgraduate training which is as vigorous in he UK as anywhere else in the world. In Austria for example if you want to be a GP you don't have any training in primary care. In Canada it only takes 3 years post graduation - in the UK it's a minimum of 5 years.

    I've rad his thread right from the beginning and all it seems to show is anecdotal evidence and personal grudges against GPs.

    Doctors are one of the most highly regulated professions in the country with annual appraisals and revalidation every 5 years. Without all this you cannot get a liscense to practice.

    We all know there are some bad doctors - same as any profession. The difference with doctors is that if folks disagree with an opinion they often find it difficult to deal with. This is perhaps a cultural problem and a NHS problem. If you get rid of the NHS patients would be free to move around to whichever GP or specialist they want. Perhaps then he public would start to have an understanding of the true value of primary care?
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    (Original post by Egypt)
    Funny thing is that in Canada you do a bachelors degree then your medical degree, then 3 years family medicine training. Which is the same time as it takes in the UK, in some case less time. Only difference is they spend less time learning medicine. The vast majority of your medical knowledge comes from postgraduate training which is as vigorous in he UK as anywhere else in the world. In Austria for example if you want to be a GP you don't have any training in primary care. In Canada it only takes 3 years post graduation - in the UK it's a minimum of 5 years.

    I've rad his thread right from the beginning and all it seems to show is anecdotal evidence and personal grudges against GPs.

    Doctors are one of the most highly regulated professions in the country with annual appraisals and revalidation every 5 years. Without all this you cannot get a liscense to practice.

    We all know there are some bad doctors - same as any profession. The difference with doctors is that if folks disagree with an opinion they often find it difficult to deal with. This is perhaps a cultural problem and a NHS problem. If you get rid of the NHS patients would be free to move around to whichever GP or specialist they want. Perhaps then he public would start to have an understanding of the true value of primary care?
    Canadians spend 4 years majoring in a science subject, along with this they take organic chemistry classes, human anatomy, phisiology and biochem before applying for grad medicine. And very few get to finish their med degree in 3 years. Most take 4 years.
    Having majoring in science first gives doctors a stronger scientific foundation so it does make you a better doctor in my opinion.
    And I do agree with your point about problems with NHS and that patients should be able to directly go to specialists.
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    My GP went to my Grandma's house last year when she was seriously ill, struggling to speak and incapable of doing anything. The GP said she had a serious case of the flu and should remain on the sofa.

    6 hours later she died on the same sofa.
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    (Original post by Bubzeh)
    My GP went to my Grandma's house last year when she was seriously ill, struggling to speak and incapable of doing anything. The GP said she had a serious case of the flu and should remain on the sofa.

    6 hours later she died on the same sofa.
    If she was that ill, why did no-one call an ambulance out instead?
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    Most of the G.Ps I've seen have been extremely competent and diligent. I did have one several years ago who would often be rude and didn't fill anyone with confidence at all but on the whole I've had no problems.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    If she was that ill, why did no-one call an ambulance out instead?
    Well, she was one of the fittest woman in our family, even at 62. Sounds silly but she was a non smoker, non drinker, she had no weight issues at all. She'd been to the doctors once or twice in her whole life, down to the fact that she doesn't like to moan about little things or the fact that she was never ill.

    So trying to get her off the sofa and to a hospital was impossible (or to ring for the ambulance). They lived in a very quiet area, some way from the City. The GP was just a street or two away. Plus it all happened so quickly.

    (Original post by Yemiisii)
    :shock:
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    (Original post by Bubzeh)
    Well, she was one of the fittest woman in our family, even at 62. Sounds silly but she was a non smoker, non drinker, she had no weight issues at all. She'd been to the doctors once or twice in her whole life, down to the fact that she doesn't like to moan about little things or the fact that she was never ill.

    So trying to get her off the sofa and to a hospital was impossible (or to ring for the ambulance). They lived in a very quiet area, some way from the City. The GP was just a street or two away. Plus it all happened so quickly.



    :eek:
    6 hours is hardly quick, an ambulance should have been called. Granted the GP should have spotted pneumonia but the public needs the common sense of when to ring an ambulance.
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    Maybe it's not that GP's are either good or bad, but but they're all sometimes good and sometimes bad.

    I have multiple stories from my GP practice but all about different GP's that have been absolutely brilliant in different circumstances.

    ME - I went to the GP on Thurs with horrendous pain in bum. He didn't even look just told me I had bruised my coccyx. On Sat was in hospital getting an emergency operation for pilonidal sinus.

    MY GRANDMOTHER - had terrible cough - went to see GP several times, he said it was a virus. Eventually saw a different GP - she said it was a side effect of blood pressure pills -stop taking them straight away. Cough went but she's still getting treated for the prolapse the extended coughing caused.

    MY FRIENDS DAD - went to GP for months with stomach pains, tried various remedies. Eventually saw a different GP - stright to hospital - got gall bladder removed next day.

    MY MUM - seeing consultant for thyroid problems, but GP has to prescribe meds. Consultant changed amount of meds - in letter and on computer. GP told my Mum he must have made a mistake! Why would she think she knows better than a consultant endocrinologist.

    MY GP - (friend of family) - treated his child for virus, child was projectile vomiting etc etc. realised about 12 hours later that said child had menigitis - (got to children's ward just in time)
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    (Original post by MJK91)
    6 hours is hardly quick, an ambulance should have been called. Granted the GP should have spotted pneumonia but the public needs the common sense of when to ring an ambulance.
    It wasn't pneumonia. She had a stroke. 6 hours was quick... She went from waking up, singing, cleaning, dancing, to sitting on the sofa after feeling dizzy and never standing back up. After 2 hours she couldn't speak properly and after 3 hours she was writing like a 3 year old child. And then...
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    (Original post by Anonymous)

    ME - I went to the GP on Thurs with horrendous pain in bum. He didn't even look just told me I had bruised my coccyx. On Sat was in hospital getting an emergency operation for pilonidal sinus.
    But what exactly did you tell the doctor? I had this and saw 2 doctors about it. Only saw the second one (the day after seeing the first) because it has bled the previous evening (first GP wanted to wait a few days and then decide whether surgery was needed) and it was getting progressively difficult to sit and walk.
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    (Original post by Bubzeh)
    It wasn't pneumonia. She had a stroke. 6 hours was quick... She went from waking up, singing, cleaning, dancing, to sitting on the sofa after feeling dizzy and never standing back up. After 2 hours she couldn't speak properly and after 3 hours she was writing like a 3 year old child. And then...
    6 hours is definitely a long time for a stroke! If you were noticing serious issues with speech and coordination, there is undoubtedly something more than the flu going on.
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    (Original post by MJK91)
    6 hours is definitely a long time for a stroke! If you were noticing serious issues with speech and coordination, there is undoubtedly something more than the flu going on.
    Indeed, Sir. The point of me arriving in this thread was to state the local GP didn't even consider it as one and brushed it off.

    Then 2 weeks later my Grandad got a typed up, 2 lined statement about her sorrow at the loss. SMH
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    (Original post by Bubzeh)
    Indeed, Sir. The point of me arriving in this thread was to state the local GP didn't even consider it as one and brushed it off.
    But you said the serious symptoms arose after the GP visited. The GP can only analyse what is there at the time -- if symptoms change, that is up to you to report.
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    (Original post by MJK91)
    But you said the serious symptoms arose after the GP visited. The GP can only analyse what is there at the time -- if symptoms change, that is up to you to report.
    Nah, the GP arrived at around the time she couldn't get her words out or stand up apparently. Tbh, I didn't think / want to get into this so much. All we know is that the GP and my grandad to an extent should have dragged her to the hospital, no matter how long the drive was.
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    (Original post by Bubzeh)
    Nah, the GP arrived at around the time she couldn't get her words out or stand up apparently. Tbh, I didn't think / want to get into this so much. All we know is that the GP and my grandad to an extent should have dragged her to the hospital, no matter how long the drive was.
    And instead you think the GP decided simply not to? I find it hard to believe it's as black and white as you say it was.
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    (Original post by MJK91)
    And instead you think the GP decided simply not to? I find it hard to believe it's as black and white as you say it was.
    Dude, the family has tried getting their heads around this for the last 13 months. I personally don't blame the GP, I'm just saying it was strange that a stroke didn't even come out of her mouth to my Grandad and she brushed it off when he mentioned it.
 
 
 
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