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My G.P is dangerously useless Watch

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    (Original post by yorkshire.lad)
    I think the next generation of doctors will hopefully be much better and there will be less of these issues.
    I'm optimistic that this will be the case. We can only hope.
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    (Original post by MENDACIUM)
    Hi! I do agree we have plenty of good doctors, but it just takes one - just one- to totally wreck ones life.

    I know SVT is not identical to VT but i can relate to the symptoms. I would be absolutely mad if i was told 'it's ok to drink two cans of red bull'.

    Red bull especially should be avoided! I also have been told not to drink soft-drinks with caffeine.

    I do accept that most doctors do a great job, but i just feel the G.P sector (despite having good doctors) needs to have a shake up where there is more regulation and accountability, and greater patient feed-back and anonymity to give this feedback.
    I'm not sure of the difference myself - something about which heart chamber the abnormal rhythm originates, and how long it lasts for, I think? Not sure. Haha, yeah I was not impressed! Looking back I should have confronted him about it, but I was a bit too taken aback to do anything at the time. :unimpressed:

    Yep, most are good, but changes would definitely benefit patients!
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    If someone would have said this to me like 3 years ago, I probably would have disagreed strongly and defended all gp's till the cows came home. However, unfortunately in mid 2010, I started noticing changes with myself, even though I had just begun to become extremely 'healthy' (or what would be classed as being healthy by all doctors) I was exercising everday, usually for about 2 hours, not taking public transport much and basically walking everywhere, and eating very healthily. I did this everyday, without fail, for about 5 months. I lost a lot of weight, and my legs became very toned. But I began to notice changes. I had always been very pear/hourglass shaped, in the fact that I'd always had a small waist and very flat stomach, with hips that curved out. As I did all this exercise, I began noticing sudden weight gain on my stomach, but none on my legs, which was the opposite of how I used gain weight (It used to go to my hips, thighs and arms, not my stomach) this continued and continued though I was exercising up to three hours a day. I began to notice my face shape changing, by chin was getting broader, and a bit longer. My cheeks looked flushed. The hairstyles I used to wear no longer suited me. Neither did my natural hair colour (medium darkish brown) so I had to start dying it jet black to look somewhat healthy and not very drawn and red, wheras before I could even pull of blonde hair without issues. My peroids became extremely irregular (every 5-7 months) I noticed sudden increased hair growth, my hair felt tougher and less soft than before, my emotions where all over the place and little things would leave me sobbing, I noticed hyper pigmentation, fat deposits on my shoulders (I was putting on weight above my shoulders suddenly, but it didn't feel like fat, it was really hard), and I was constantly over heated, amongst many other symptoms.
    So anyway, I had no idea what was going on with my body and appearance, and it made me become basically dysmorphic, and very insecure. I did some looking online, and found two conditions I thought it could be, either Pcos (polycystic ovarion syndrome) or Cushing's disease, both hormonal endocrine disorders. So I went to my gp, I told her about all the symptoms, and at first she said it was 'normal' to not have a single peroid in 7 months, because I was 18 at the time, and at first she was very reluctant to even refer me for any tests whatsoever. I had to basically plead with her to refer me. When I mentioned Cushing's disease, she completely brushed me off and ignored what I said, but she said I could be reffered for pcos tests.

    So I had the tests done, and it turned out I did have pcos, and it was very obvious in both blood tests and ultrasounds.

    After that, the doctors decided to prescribe me mercilon, which is a form of birth control, to try and regulate my hormones. I went to see about 4 different gp's, all refusing to let me have a single test for Cushing's disease, saying only '3 million people have that condition' and that 'it's far too rare to even be a remote possibility' which is an absouletely ridiculous think to say because it is severly under-diagnosed, because most doctors use this line and refuse to test anyone for it, even when they are a textbook case.
    So I went to another gp, asked him if I could please just have the test so I would no if I didn't have it, so I could stop thinking about it because it was worrying me. He treated me like a complete hypochondriac, which I am not and have never been in my entire life, and he told me to leave the gp room and stand outside in the hallway (like he was a teacher who I had disobeyed or something) whilst he made a phone call in private to gp's in a higher position to get a second opinion as to whether I should be allowed to have the test done. So I stood outthere for about 30 minutes, waiting him for him to finish his phonecalls with the door shut. Then he said you can come back in again rudely, and said he can't do the test, but that he can refer me to the endocrine department at UCL.

    I got reffered, but my appointment was about 4 and half months later! So I had to wait all that time. I asked this doctor, could I have the test for Cushing's please (cortisol test), again, he completely brushed me off, and didn't want to do it. He finally agreed after I pestered and said I could have the test done though he didn't see much point as it's rare.
    Anyway, he gave me a form for a urine test, I accidently left the form in my room, which my mum then threw away by accident. I phoned them up and they said they could not give me a new form. It took me about another 5 months to get a new bloody form!!! I had to phone up his Pa basically every other day, as she was always on answering machine, I went to the hospital itself and asked, again 'no sorry we can't, we don't have the power to, ask the doctor you saw' but he was never there, and it was a real pain in the you know what.

    I finally got a new form in January this year, this time though, they had accidently (or purposefully, I don't know) changed it to a blood cortisol test, which is notoriously unreliable and only is successful in diagnosing in about 60% of cases, unlike urine which has a 95% success rate. I got the blood test done regardless, because I was tired of having to wait for months (it had been a whole YEAR since I had first been to my gp about my symptoms and had asked for a simple cortisol test) so I just did it.

    Then, guess what? No results. I waited for about 3 weeks for my results to come in the post, until I emailed them and said if they knew when I would get my results. They replied, thanks for your query and that they would get back to me soon. Another 3 weeks passed, no results still. I emailed them again, a week passed, and no results. I phoned them up finally, before they said I had missed an appointment with them in Feburary (had a university open day so I couldn't go) which is why I hadn't recieved my results. Usually, my gp will ALWAYS send me summary of results by post (not the exact results, but a summary, eg your cholesterol was slightly high, or your estrogen was slightly low) but 'suddnely' it was my fault because I couldn't attend. Then she told me over the phone, we can book you a new appointment in SEPTEMBER 2013 where you will be able to discuss your results!! I mean seriously?! I will be leaving London for Uni in the north east corner of England by September. I cannot wait so long for a simple answer for a simple test, whether my cortisol is in the normal range or not. I asked her, can't you just tell me over the phone, or post it to me? She said, we don't usually just give out results like that to people (but it's my results?! don't i even have the right to know about my own health or is it supposed to be a secret?!) so no she couldn't, she would have to ask the gp who did my blood test if possibly it could be posted to me, though it's highly unlikely. So I said if possible could she please ask her.

    So I waited about a week, before FINALLY getting an email from this doctor saying my results where on the way in the post, and that they are 'very sorry about the delay'. Whatever. This was about a week ago. I just hope now the results come in the post and that they aren't lying.

    Another thing I forgot to mention, is how no gp wanted to give me metformin for my pcos (nearly everyone is offered it). I was still exercising daily, eating very healthily, but putting on weight regardless of what I did, w
    no weight coming off. Yet I was still being prescribed birth control as a treatment (known to cause weight gain) and also, the birth control I was being given (mercilon) is written all over the internet to not be used by anyone who has epilepsy or has ever had a seizure. I've had 4 seizures in my life (tonic clonic) and used to take lamitcal for it though I stopped in 2011 as I had been seizure free for a few years. Anyway, no gp mentioned this to me, though I saw it all over the internet, and even in the leaflet that came with the mercilon, to never use if you've had seizures, or if your even slightly over weight.
    Well anyway, I was due to withdraw my mercilon for 7 days to provoke a withdrawal bleed, I did this, and a day after withdrawing, I suddenly got the first full migraine I'd ever had in my life. By full migraine I mean I had an 'aura' about 15 minutes before the horrible headache. An aura is when you see flashing lights and you can't see properly before your migraine. If you get an aura, it means your risk of stroke is increased by 10 fold or something (and i'm only 19), and after that I had a migraine that lasted a whole day, I was sick (disgusting I know) about 5 times, I had an awful pain in the side of my head that felt like someone was drilling into my skull, and I couldn't sleep, but I had no energy, and I lay with all the lights off and tv off for about 12 hours because it was so painful.

    Anyway, apparently all this was caused by the mercilon, it had caused a downward spike in my hormones when I had stopped taking it to provoke the bleed, which triggered the migraine and aura. I can never take any form of birth control ever again now because of this I was told by my Gp, because I have an increased risk of stroke.

    They where STILL reluctant to let me have metformin after that, to help me with my insulin resistance and increase weight loss (which would help symptoms I am told). I had to plead and then they finally let me on it.
    I've stopped taking it since because it gave me extreme anxiety and left me over heated all the time, a short walk to the train station would leave me soaked in sweat, and at work I almost fainted four times during the two weeks I was on it.
    I should be going back on it soon though, I'm waiting for my results from the cortisol test before I do, because I have no other options but to take it, or my pcos symptoms will just get worse, and I may not be able to have children.

    All in all, I have to be honest and say I've lost a lot of faith in the nhs, I always used to be a firm supporter of it and would defend all gp's. But I've read statistics saying that about 50% of patients are misdiagnosed. It's really concerning, and the patient is made to feel very small and as though their opinion does not matter. The system isn't really working in many way in certain sectors, and they are very scared about wasting money on what they feel would probably be unnecessary tests. They are more scared about the nhs having to pay for an extra test, than they are about misdiagnosing someone with an incorrect ilness because it would be the simpler option. It's very upsetting because you end up feeling completely powerless when it comes to your own health. And you end up even feeling like you probably are a hypochondriac, when you aren't.
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    (Original post by MENDACIUM)
    I'm guilty of this myself imo. You feel better and you stop.

    Personally, i feel it's less about prescribing it and more about patients not properly finishing it.
    Yes very true... so essentially, what you are saying is that people don't listen to their doctor and FINISH THE COURSE!
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    (Original post by MENDACIUM)
    I can see what you mean by saying that the NHS is already strained in resources, and that regulations will mean more money being spent and more time being used. I just feel it is a priority , and that it out-weighs potential strains on the resources of the NHS.

    As a side-note:

    Do you feel the doctors of old, who needed far lower grade to get into medicine, and many who come from abroad need to be re-regulated ?

    I have high-hopes for the medics from 2000 and onwards, but before that...i am not too sure.

    This is speculation ofcourse, but i just wanted to throw this question out there.
    In the hospitals i don't feel that there is a great deal of difference, the main difference is normally their level of arrogance and lack of social skills. In general practice i don't feel that the oldies are quite as good as the young ones. My own GP is newly qualified as a GP and is a fantastic doctor who communicated very well. The big difference between the two seem to be in history taking and examination, the oldies will glide over topics and skip steps whereas we now have it drilled into us that every step should be performed and are taught the specific histories for each system.

    In terms of going back to regulation i don't think that regulation needs to be changed drastically. It is already heading in the right direction with increasing performance review and re-validation along with an increased patient voice. The key is in education; too many people in my year are solely exam driven and if it won't be on the exam they won't learn it. This has to change if we want to produce doctors who are truly rounded. Then when you qualify you soon realize that all those promised hours for education just won't materialised. Whilst regulation is a part of modern medicine, the priority should be educating the workforce
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    (Original post by littleeggy)
    Over prescribing of antibiotics is the reason why (if we are not careful about overuse) people will start dying in hospital during routine operations.

    Antibiotic resistance!
    I heard about this on the news the other day - quite a scary thought...! :eek:

    To be fair though, in my case, I genuinely did need antibiotics. I had had this horrendous cough for 9 weeks, as soon as I got on a course of antibiotics, it began to clear up. Massive improvement in a matter of days. So it wasn't unnecessary
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    I spent a year with the symptoms of gallstones, eventually being told by a hospital consultant that as I didn't actually have gallstones, the cause of my pain was undiagnosable. Thankfully my GP was as frustrated as me and I raided my emergency savings to have him refer me to a private consultant. I had a diagnosis of costochondritis within 20 minutes of arriving in his consulting room.

    The NHS consultant had made up his mind that I was faking before I even saw him - at one point he sent me a letter assuring me that as my symptoms had subsided, I no longer needed to see him. Neither I nor my GP could figure out who told him that and my GP told him in no uncertain terms that he definitely needed to see me. The consultant had been so sure that I was faking, that when he grudgingly agreed to see me, he failed to examine me properly and tried to prevent me from being referred elsewhere. In this instance, I have my GP to thank for not believing the consultant and persisting, even though he could do no more for me via the NHS.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    If someone would have said this to me like 3 years ago, I probably would have disagreed strongly and defended all gp's till the cows came home. However, unfortunately in mid 2010, I started noticing changes with myself, even though I had just begun to become extremely 'healthy' (or what would be classed as being healthy by all doctors) I was exercising everday, usually for about 2 hours, not taking public transport much and basically walking everywhere, and eating very healthily. I did this everyday, without fail, for about 5 months. I lost a lot of weight, and my legs became very toned. But I began to notice changes. I had always been very pear/hourglass shaped, in the fact that I'd always had a small waist and very flat stomach, with hips that curved out. As I did all this exercise, I began noticing sudden weight gain on my stomach, but none on my legs, which was the opposite of how I used gain weight (It used to go to my hips, thighs and arms, not my stomach) this continued and continued though I was exercising up to three hours a day. I began to notice my face shape changing, by chin was getting broader, and a bit longer. My cheeks looked flushed. The hairstyles I used to wear no longer suited me. Neither did my natural hair colour (medium darkish brown) so I had to start dying it jet black to look somewhat healthy and not very drawn and red, wheras before I could even pull of blonde hair without issues. My peroids became extremely irregular (every 5-7 months) I noticed sudden increased hair growth, my hair felt tougher and less soft than before, my emotions where all over the place and little things would leave me sobbing, I noticed hyper pigmentation, fat deposits on my shoulders (I was putting on weight above my shoulders suddenly, but it didn't feel like fat, it was really hard), and I was constantly over heated, amongst many other symptoms.
    So anyway, I had no idea what was going on with my body and appearance, and it made me become basically dysmorphic, and very insecure. I did some looking online, and found two conditions I thought it could be, either Pcos (polycystic ovarion syndrome) or Cushing's disease, both hormonal endocrine disorders. So I went to my gp, I told her about all the symptoms, and at first she said it was 'normal' to not have a single peroid in 7 months, because I was 18 at the time, and at first she was very reluctant to even refer me for any tests whatsoever. I had to basically plead with her to refer me. When I mentioned Cushing's disease, she completely brushed me off and ignored what I said, but she said I could be reffered for pcos tests.

    So I had the tests done, and it turned out I did have pcos, and it was very obvious in both blood tests and ultrasounds.

    After that, the doctors decided to prescribe me mercilon, which is a form of birth control, to try and regulate my hormones. I went to see about 4 different gp's, all refusing to let me have a single test for Cushing's disease, saying only '3 million people have that condition' and that 'it's far too rare to even be a remote possibility' which is an absouletely ridiculous think to say because it is severly under-diagnosed, because most doctors use this line and refuse to test anyone for it, even when they are a textbook case.
    So I went to another gp, asked him if I could please just have the test so I would no if I didn't have it, so I could stop thinking about it because it was worrying me. He treated me like a complete hypochondriac, which I am not and have never been in my entire life, and he told me to leave the gp room and stand outside in the hallway (like he was a teacher who I had disobeyed or something) whilst he made a phone call in private to gp's in a higher position to get a second opinion as to whether I should be allowed to have the test done. So I stood outthere for about 30 minutes, waiting him for him to finish his phonecalls with the door shut. Then he said you can come back in again rudely, and said he can't do the test, but that he can refer me to the endocrine department at UCL.

    I got reffered, but my appointment was about 4 and half months later! So I had to wait all that time. I asked this doctor, could I have the test for Cushing's please (cortisol test), again, he completely brushed me off, and didn't want to do it. He finally agreed after I pestered and said I could have the test done though he didn't see much point as it's rare.
    Anyway, he gave me a form for a urine test, I accidently left the form in my room, which my mum then threw away by accident. I phoned them up and they said they could not give me a new form. It took me about another 5 months to get a new bloody form!!! I had to phone up his Pa basically every other day, as she was always on answering machine, I went to the hospital itself and asked, again 'no sorry we can't, we don't have the power to, ask the doctor you saw' but he was never there, and it was a real pain in the you know what.

    I finally got a new form in January this year, this time though, they had accidently (or purposefully, I don't know) changed it to a blood cortisol test, which is notoriously unreliable and only is successful in diagnosing in about 60% of cases, unlike urine which has a 95% success rate. I got the blood test done regardless, because I was tired of having to wait for months (it had been a whole YEAR since I had first been to my gp about my symptoms and had asked for a simple cortisol test) so I just did it.

    Then, guess what? No results. I waited for about 3 weeks for my results to come in the post, until I emailed them and said if they knew when I would get my results. They replied, thanks for your query and that they would get back to me soon. Another 3 weeks passed, no results still. I emailed them again, a week passed, and no results. I phoned them up finally, before they said I had missed an appointment with them in Feburary (had a university open day so I couldn't go) which is why I hadn't recieved my results. Usually, my gp will ALWAYS send me summary of results by post (not the exact results, but a summary, eg your cholesterol was slightly high, or your estrogen was slightly low) but 'suddnely' it was my fault because I couldn't attend. Then she told me over the phone, we can book you a new appointment in SEPTEMBER 2013 where you will be able to discuss your results!! I mean seriously?! I will be leaving London for Uni in the north east corner of England by September. I cannot wait so long for a simple answer for a simple test, whether my cortisol is in the normal range or not. I asked her, can't you just tell me over the phone, or post it to me? She said, we don't usually just give out results like that to people (but it's my results?! don't i even have the right to know about my own health or is it supposed to be a secret?!) so no she couldn't, she would have to ask the gp who did my blood test if possibly it could be posted to me, though it's highly unlikely. So I said if possible could she please ask her.

    So I waited about a week, before FINALLY getting an email from this doctor saying my results where on the way in the post, and that they are 'very sorry about the delay'. Whatever. This was about a week ago. I just hope now the results come in the post and that they aren't lying.

    Another thing I forgot to mention, is how no gp wanted to give me metformin for my pcos (nearly everyone is offered it). I was still exercising daily, eating very healthily, but putting on weight regardless of what I did, w
    no weight coming off. Yet I was still being prescribed birth control as a treatment (known to cause weight gain) and also, the birth control I was being given (mercilon) is written all over the internet to not be used by anyone who has epilepsy or has ever had a seizure. I've had 4 seizures in my life (tonic clonic) and used to take lamitcal for it though I stopped in 2011 as I had been seizure free for a few years. Anyway, no gp mentioned this to me, though I saw it all over the internet, and even in the leaflet that came with the mercilon, to never use if you've had seizures, or if your even slightly over weight.
    Well anyway, I was due to withdraw my mercilon for 7 days to provoke a withdrawal bleed, I did this, and a day after withdrawing, I suddenly got the first full migraine I'd ever had in my life. By full migraine I mean I had an 'aura' about 15 minutes before the horrible headache. An aura is when you see flashing lights and you can't see properly before your migraine. If you get an aura, it means your risk of stroke is increased by 10 fold or something (and i'm only 19), and after that I had a migraine that lasted a whole day, I was sick (disgusting I know) about 5 times, I had an awful pain in the side of my head that felt like someone was drilling into my skull, and I couldn't sleep, but I had no energy, and I lay with all the lights off and tv off for about 12 hours because it was so painful.

    Anyway, apparently all this was caused by the mercilon, it had caused a downward spike in my hormones when I had stopped taking it to provoke the bleed, which triggered the migraine and aura. I can never take any form of birth control ever again now because of this I was told by my Gp, because I have an increased risk of stroke.

    They where STILL reluctant to let me have metformin after that, to help me with my insulin resistance and increase weight loss (which would help symptoms I am told). I had to plead and then they finally let me on it.
    I've stopped taking it since because it gave me extreme anxiety and left me over heated all the time, a short walk to the train station would leave me soaked in sweat, and at work I almost fainted four times during the two weeks I was on it.
    I should be going back on it soon though, I'm waiting for my results from the cortisol test before I do, because I have no other options but to take it, or my pcos symptoms will just get worse, and I may not be able to have children.

    All in all, I have to be honest and say I've lost a lot of faith in the nhs, I always used to be a firm supporter of it and would defend all gp's. But I've read statistics saying that about 50% of patients are misdiagnosed. It's really concerning, and the patient is made to feel very small and as though their opinion does not matter. The system isn't really working in many way in certain sectors, and they are very scared about wasting money on what they feel would probably be unnecessary tests. They are more scared about the nhs having to pay for an extra test, than they are about misdiagnosing someone with an incorrect ilness because it would be the simpler option. It's very upsetting because you end up feeling completely powerless when it comes to your own health. And you end up even feeling like you probably are a hypochondriac, when you aren't.

    I have to thank you for relaying your experiences, and reading through it all, i really can see you have been through quite a lot. The first thing i want to say is that there are good doctors and G.P's. I would definitely keep going but try to find a G.P you know is competent and let them know this. No -matter what , you're not alone, and i know the handful of incompetent G.P's can truly make one lose hope in the entire establishment.

    I couldn't help but nod at a lot of the things you wrote however. I had POTS, and SVT and was told it's 'anxiety' , have some 'anti-biotics', you don't need a 'heart test', you're young.

    It's very wierd to think i knew exactly what was wrong with me, was requesting the tests and was again and again being denied them.

    Out of the blue, from someone who played sports to someone who could had random palpitations and extreme-exercise intolerance , despite me accurately giving them the symptoms for TWO years they did not diagnose me.

    I ended up going abroad on holiday and getting the tests there. They then actually referred me and it was shown i had two unknown ilnesses.


    Doctors and G.p's are great (most of them). You just have to fight. Don't lose hope, join forums where people perhaps share similar ilnesses as you do, and make sure you keep going to the G.P's UNTIL they can give you proper care and treatment. This is your right. It is well within your right to also complain.

    edit: To add, i can relate to you about the LONG waiting lists. In my experiences, when a G.P says 'you have nothing, but let me refer you' they put the referral to LOW priority, so it takes longer.

    I mean, why on earth should a G.P have to wait for a PATIENT to clarify they need a referral? Surely they should have known and referred the patient to begin with.

    I really feel for you, and can see you've clearly gone through A LOT. But keep fighting. In life, we're our biggest advocate. We need to fight for our rights, even if that means ensuring doctors do their job and treat us.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    If someone would have said this to me like 3 years ago, I probably would have disagreed strongly and defended all gp's till the cows came home. However, unfortunately in mid 2010, I started noticing changes with myself, even though I had just begun to become extremely 'healthy' (or what would be classed as being healthy by all doctors) I was exercising everday, usually for about 2 hours, not taking public transport much and basically walking everywhere, and eating very healthily. I did this everyday, without fail, for about 5 months. I lost a lot of weight, and my legs became very toned. But I began to notice changes. I had always been very pear/hourglass shaped, in the fact that I'd always had a small waist and very flat stomach, with hips that curved out. As I did all this exercise, I began noticing sudden weight gain on my stomach, but none on my legs, which was the opposite of how I used gain weight (It used to go to my hips, thighs and arms, not my stomach) this continued and continued though I was exercising up to three hours a day. I began to notice my face shape changing, by chin was getting broader, and a bit longer. My cheeks looked flushed. The hairstyles I used to wear no longer suited me. Neither did my natural hair colour (medium darkish brown) so I had to start dying it jet black to look somewhat healthy and not very drawn and red, wheras before I could even pull of blonde hair without issues. My peroids became extremely irregular (every 5-7 months) I noticed sudden increased hair growth, my hair felt tougher and less soft than before, my emotions where all over the place and little things would leave me sobbing, I noticed hyper pigmentation, fat deposits on my shoulders (I was putting on weight above my shoulders suddenly, but it didn't feel like fat, it was really hard), and I was constantly over heated, amongst many other symptoms.
    So anyway, I had no idea what was going on with my body and appearance, and it made me become basically dysmorphic, and very insecure. I did some looking online, and found two conditions I thought it could be, either Pcos (polycystic ovarion syndrome) or Cushing's disease, both hormonal endocrine disorders. So I went to my gp, I told her about all the symptoms, and at first she said it was 'normal' to not have a single peroid in 7 months, because I was 18 at the time, and at first she was very reluctant to even refer me for any tests whatsoever. I had to basically plead with her to refer me. When I mentioned Cushing's disease, she completely brushed me off and ignored what I said, but she said I could be reffered for pcos tests...
    Damn, it sounds like you've been through hell the past few years and the ordeal isn't even over yet, I really do feel for you. I hope you get those damn results. I know how it feels waiting for a diagnosis and not knowing whether you want it to be positive so you can get the treatment or whether you don't want to actually have the disease. I'm guessing after almost 3 years it's most likely the former for you though.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    I spent a year with the symptoms of gallstones, eventually being told by a hospital consultant that as I didn't actually have gallstones, the cause of my pain was undiagnosable. Thankfully my GP was as frustrated as me and I raided my emergency savings to have him refer me to a private consultant. I had a diagnosis of costochondritis within 20 minutes of arriving in his consulting room.

    The NHS consultant had made up his mind that I was faking before I even saw him - at one point he sent me a letter assuring me that as my symptoms had subsided, I no longer needed to see him. Neither I nor my GP could figure out who told him that and my GP told him in no uncertain terms that he definitely needed to see me. The consultant had been so sure that I was faking, that when he grudgingly agreed to see me, he failed to examine me properly and tried to prevent me from being referred elsewhere. In this instance, I have my GP to thank for not believing the consultant and persisting, even though he could do no more for me via the NHS.
    Wow. What i can relate to here is knowing i had an ilness, knowing i was misdiagnosed, and going so many times until they actually got it right(when it should have been the first time, or maybe the first few when the alarm bells should have started to ring).

    I hope you're fine, and it's good to see it in reverse (good GP , not so great consultant).

    What happened to evidence based medicine?
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    And how much is this because you've not given them the full symptoms you have? Last year, I went to see a GP to get a referral for something. Because there was a huge range of symptoms, I handed him a piece of paper, which explained my symptoms. Because I had a feeling he might say "that is because of your diagnosis of x", I wrote that I was aware that some with a symptom of y are sometimes diagnosed with x; but it's also common in the diagnosis I was looking for.

    He agreed to the referral after discussing it with someone. (he's a trainee and didn't know what to do with me)

    I've seen 3 different GPs about a problem I've had on and off for about 5 years. First GP took felt my tummy and gave me some medication to take. Second GP decided it was a cold (WTF? I have excess stomach acid and had a burning sensation. I had nothing wrong with my nose or throat) and third GP did the same as the first GP. Second GP did ask me if I was pregnant / had anxiety. My only symptom was a burning sensation in my stomach.

    From experience, many GPs won't just chuck medication at me. You are also allowed to say no.

    Some GPs are useless and some are bloody fantastic. I would rather they said "I don't know what to do with you" (as one did and referred me to someone else who agreed with the diagnosis and gave me something else to take) than give me the wrong advice.
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    I think this is an interesting and relevant talk that covers some of the issues that have been made here.
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    (Original post by MENDACIUM)
    I just don't feel the regulation and discussion is enough. I appreciate i have a lot more to learn , but two years of misdiagnosis occured with me, and malpractise.
    2 years? Try being told (well, parents were) there's nothing wrong with you and then finding out 16 years later that you had (they don't know if I've still got it) an illness which either kills people or leaves many with brain injuries.

    And that's not the only time either. Someone managed to miss the fact that I've got part of my eye missing, which was only discovered after they were checking my eye pressure. And someone else managed to miss 2 cysts on my brain. Compared to some, you're lucky.
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    (Original post by MENDACIUM)
    GP misses signs of cancer in Dispatches investigation

    2 Oct 2011 00:00
    A DOCTOR told a “patient” with classic signs of bowel cancer he had constipation and said: “Get yourself some mangoes.

    http://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/celebrit...spatches-82596

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...-watchdog.html

    One psychiatrist told me to eat avocados as a cure for mental ailments.

    Five doctors missed the fact that gallstones were the cause of my agonising pain. The diagnoses ranged from psychosomatic pain to indigestion :cool:
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    (Original post by MENDACIUM)
    I have to thank you for relaying your experiences, and reading through it all, i really can see you have been through quite a lot. The first thing i want to say is that there are good doctors and G.P's. I would definitely keep going but try to find a G.P you know is competent and let them know this. No -matter what , you're not alone, and i know the handful of incompetent G.P's can truly make one lose hope in the entire establishment.

    I couldn't help but nod at a lot of the things you wrote however. I had POTS, and SVT and was told it's 'anxiety' , have some 'anti-biotics', you don't need a 'heart test', you're young.

    It's very wierd to think i knew exactly what was wrong with me, was requesting the tests and was again and again being denied them.

    Out of the blue, from someone who played sports to someone who could had random palpitations and extreme-exercise intolerance , despite me accurately giving them the symptoms for TWO years they did not diagnose me.

    I ended up going abroad on holiday and getting the tests there. They then actually referred me and it was shown i had two unknown ilnesses.


    Doctors and G.p's are great (most of them). You just have to fight. Don't lose hope, join forums where people perhaps share similar ilnesses as you do, and make sure you keep going to the G.P's UNTIL they can give you proper care and treatment. This is your right. It is well within your right to also complain.

    edit: To add, i can relate to you about the LONG waiting lists. In my experiences, when a G.P says 'you have nothing, but let me refer you' they put the referral to LOW priority, so it takes longer.

    I mean, why on earth should a G.P have to wait for a PATIENT to clarify they need a referral? Surely they should have known and referred the patient to begin with.

    I really feel for you, and can see you've clearly gone through A LOT. But keep fighting. In life, we're our biggest advocate. We need to fight for our rights, even if that means ensuring doctors do their job and treat us.
    Thanks for your respsonse. Yes I would have to agree, there have been a few gp's I have met who have taken me seriously, and have not brushed me off, and who have been really good. One of them is my regular gp, she didn't basically laugh off (what the majoirty of other gp's I saw did) my suggestion that I would like to have a cortisol test done if possible, she said it was a good idea as cushing's could be a possibility, and we had to rule out everything to be sure it's pcos, and that it's definetly hormonal.

    But yeah, the past few years have been really difficult, especially as I had no idea I had pcos but was having all the symptoms from 2010 to 2012. It effected my attendance greatly at college, I became extremely insecure, because even though I was doing all I could to lose weight and go back to how I was (exercising everyday, eating very little) nothing was working, and my appearance and body was changing and I thought it was all my own fault. My teachers where all angry at me, because they didn't know I had pcos and thought I just couldn't be bothered to come in. I became basically dysmorphic, I despised myself for 'allowing' myself to gain weight (although it was only about 10 kilos) and could hardly bare to even look at my reflection, though I would put on lots of make up, and take hours to decide what to wear. Even my own family thought I was being very vain. It was a very frustrating and difficult experience to go through. The funny thing is, the government tells us, or likes to promote the idea of that if we exercise as much as possible, and eat healthily, we too will be healthily though I very much doubt that is the full picture. I think too much exercise (especially for women) can be dangerous and can have a big effect on our hormones. I was perfectly fine and of a healthy weigh before I started all the exercise. What upsets me though, is when doctors say 'exercise will help your pcos dramatically, so you should probably start doing that'. I notice whenever I do a lot of exercise, my peroids become even more irregular, and my symptoms all get even more worse. It's so patronizing because some of them treat you like you're doing nothing to help yourself, when the truth is regardless of what you do it just gets worse. Pcos isn't curable which is another reason it can be really disheartening.

    And yes, I can totally relate to the fact you where told 'you're young' 'there's nothing wrong with you' etc. It must have been difficult for you also, knowing for two years, but not having someone listen to you, when obviously you know your body better than anyone else.

    And thanks, yes I will try to keep fighting, I have to otherwise my health will just get worse. I wish you all the best.
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    (Original post by Stanley90)
    Damn, it sounds like you've been through hell the past few years and the ordeal isn't even over yet, I really do feel for you. I hope you get those damn results. I know how it feels waiting for a diagnosis and not knowing whether you want it to be positive so you can get the treatment or whether you don't want to actually have the disease. I'm guessing after almost 3 years it's most likely the former for you though.
    Yeah, it's been really difficult. The worst part was not knowing what was wrong with me, and thinking it was just part of getting older, and I used to blame myself for the weight gain I was having, even though I was exercising religously and hardly eating. I became basically dysmorphic, and it effected every aspect of my life, including my education and my a levels, I ended up hardly coming into college because of and was kicked out only two months before the final A2 exams with two university offers because of my attendance. Thankfully, I applied again to uni this year as a private candidate, and have gotten two university offers, and hopefully will be going in September. But still, it feels like it has taken away like three years of my life, and I feel like I've lost some of my youth because of it all.
    And yeah, that's pretty much how I feel now, I don't really care what it is anymore, I just want to get it treated and to get rid of it so I can go back to living my life the way I used to before I started noticing the symptoms. Pcos isn't curable, only somewhat managable (though the reason I sometimes doubt it's only pcos is because I have other symtpoms that aren't associated with pcos whatsoever, eg the facial shape changes, the fat above shoulders, flushed cheeks, and weight loss is proving basically impossible, even when I was on three metformin's a day and hardly eating, and exercising) all these other symptoms (including my pcos symptoms) are all very typical of cushings. Hence why I wanted to have the test done for cushing's, so at least I could rule it out, especially as cushing's is usually caused by a tumour on the pituitary gland. If it is cushing's, there is a cure (surgery to remove the tumour) and although it's an awful condition, at least I could have the chance to get rid of these symptoms and go back to life before I started noticing changes.
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    1.Medcical school needs to discrimrate on naturall intelligence to greater degree as opposeed to academic achivement (which in the uk is not nearly as closly collerated to IQ as it needs to be)

    2. Privatetize the NHS its the lesser of two evils, no govermment run services is ever efficent
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    My local GP put me on antibiotics which I thought was strange for a fungus infection I had? So I went to the hospital doctors and they said I should stop taking them immediately and my local GP only gave me to look like he was doing something "/ so yes the majority of them are useless
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    (Original post by Barlow)
    My local GP put me on antibiotics which I thought was strange for a fungus infection I had? So I went to the hospital doctors and they said I should stop taking them immediately and my local GP only gave me to look like he was doing something "/ so yes the majority of them are useless
    One GP doesn't represent the majority. A lot of the time, it's because a patient doesn't tell the GP everything. They're not mind readers.
 
 
 
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