Join TSR now for chat about life, relationships, fashion and more…Sign up now

My G.P is dangerously useless Watch

    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MENDACIUM)
    -rubbish-
    tbh you come across as someone who has Hypochondriasis and is very critical of the healthcare system, no one ever claimed the NHS is perfect and yes what-a-surprise it is that doctors ARE HUMANS AND MAKE MISTAKES? WOW???!
    If you don't like the system try living in a third world country and see how the healthcare there works out for ya.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MattKneale)
    You mean we shouldn't think she's stupid for ignoring medical advice from someone better trained?

    I apologise.
    Plenty of times I've ignored medical advice, so has my best friend who is studying to be a doctor (she pointed out instances where people who are training her have blatantly said things that are wrong) and her mother is a nurse and takes medical advice with caution too. Doctors are not always right but for the most part they are. If I had have actually had stomach ulcers I'd not be as healthy as I am now- what danger would I have been in taking stuff for my stomach that was so strong? I've no idea but sure glad I didn't take them.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sgt.Incontro)
    And you have?

    Whether the OP has or not is completely irrelevant, at least for the majority of his argument/post.

    The main point is that GP's seem to be incompetent, and that this is definitely not a single case, but instead becoming a worrying trend.
    I havent, nor did I clame to have been to med school. The OP was adding that to his argument as if he had a divine opinion on the situation, which in reality he doesn't. He can't tell a doctor that he his doing his job wrong when he hasn't even got to med school! And show me the facts other than daily mail links that this is a 'trend'.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Callumhamby)
    I havent, nor did I clame to have been to med school. The OP was adding that to his argument as if he had a divine opinion on the situation, which in reality he doesn't. He can't tell a doctor that he his doing his job wrong when he hasn't even got to med school! And show me the facts other than daily mail links that this is a 'trend'.
    Of course it is possible to tell that a GP is wrong, whether or not you have been to medical school. If you have gotten opinions from dozens of others in the field, and all of them heavily disagree with the opinion of your GP, then it is quite damn obvious.

    My countless own personal experiences tell me this - I tend to jump between GP practices a lot, as I often come across extremely incompetent ones. Maybe there is a much lower standard of GP medical care in the UK - as I have had several "perfect" GP's back in Australia.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sgt.Incontro)
    Of course it is possible to tell that a GP is wrong, whether or not you have been to medical school. If you have gotten opinions from dozens of others in the field, and all of them heavily disagree with the opinion of your GP, then it is quite damn obvious.

    My countless own personal experiences tell me this - I tend to jump between GP practices a lot, as I often come across extremely incompetent ones. Maybe there is a much lower standard of GP medical care in the UK - as I have had several "perfect" GP's back in Australia.
    OK, so that is just your own personal experience? Personally I have brilliant care from NHS GPs. My point being is how do YOU know the GP is incompetent other than others telling you? Surely you can only tell a GP that they are doing their job wrong if you are a professional yourself.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Callumhamby)
    OK, so that is just your own personal experience?
    Yep, purely my own personal experience. I think I have switched between at least 5 GP's (and counting lol) within the past few months alone. Probably more.


    (Original post by Callumhamby)
    Personally I have brilliant care from NHS GPs. My point being is how do YOU know the GP is incompetent other than others telling you?
    For the following reasons:
    A) Numbers - if half a dozen specialists are telling you the same advice, but your GP insists the opposite - who are you going to believe?

    B) Applied knowledge - GP's can also have a very wide band of knowledge - but remember that specialists have been studying the same specific area of knowledge for years and years. Very good ones are almost always involved in research - writing papers etc...

    Lucky for you. Send some of your GP's over to my area :rolleyes:

    (Original post by Callumhamby)
    Surely you can only tell a GP that they are doing their job wrong if you are a professional yourself.
    Not necessarily. Also remember that I could be in the field myself, but be a very crappy doctor. Just because you are in the field never necessarily equates to having sufficient knowledge. There will always be others in the same field who will know much more, and much LESS.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hslt)
    You have been watching a LOT of house haven't you?

    Since a treadmill test isn't available, I believe the next house protocol is to stress you in some other way - one time he did it by insulting a guy, another by beating him at chess, I think he also did it by telling some guy his wife was cheating on him...
    Lol! I actually prefer Scrubs. But LOL
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SeriouslySmart)
    tbh you come across as someone who has Hypochondriasis and is very critical of the healthcare system, no one ever claimed the NHS is perfect and yes what-a-surprise it is that doctors ARE HUMANS AND MAKE MISTAKES? WOW???!
    If you don't like the system try living in a third world country and see how the healthcare there works out for ya.
    The majority of doctors are competent, but the issue is that neither doctors nor the NHS are perfect. I have tried to give my doctors a fair reflection, but there truly are very few redeeming qualities. One may think this is just from me but there have been extreme cases of negligence - not making honest mistakes. From G.P'S, whole hospitals ect. It's more prevelant than you would think it is. In my case, doctors failed to give a treadmill test to someone who had extreme palpitations and breathlessness upon performing exercise. I am not asking for a diagnosis on sight. I am asking for doctors not to spend two years doing point-less examinations, giving me anti-biotics on and off for two years, not doing to the tests required and such. If I truly never needed a treadmill test, why give it to me eventually? The third world countries have public and private hospitals. Just because we may be lucky to get a free and relatively good NHS does not allow doctors or healthcare professionals to be absolutely and utterly negligent, rude, patronising ect.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MENDACIUM)
    The majority of doctors are competent, but the issue is that neither doctors nor the NHS are perfect. I have tried to give my doctors a fair reflection, but there truly are very few redeeming qualities. One may think this is just from me but there have been extreme cases of negligence - not making honest mistakes. From G.P'S, whole hospitals ect. It's more prevelant than you would think it is. In my case, doctors failed to give a treadmill test to someone who had extreme palpitations and breathlessness upon performing exercise. I am not asking for a diagnosis on sight. I am asking for doctors not to spend two years doing point-less examinations, giving me anti-biotics on and off for two years, not doing to the tests required and such. If I truly never needed a treadmill test, why give it to me eventually? The third world countries have public and private hospitals. Just because we may be lucky to get a free and relatively good NHS does not allow doctors or healthcare professionals to be absolutely and utterly negligent, rude, patronising ect.
    Ok well fair enough in that sense.
    Yes things can always improve and maybe if neglect is more prevalent than it seems then there definitely is room for improvement but I still don't see the whole 'broken-system' concept you're portraying, have you considered moving surgery? Or if you wan't to be extreme about it and are talking in terms of Hospitals and NHS trusts - have you considered moving from the region you live in?

    E: One thing I will agree on is that medical care can vary considerably from region to region and with different NHS trusts.
    Contrasts in health care between the north and south of the UK are well documented and proven statistically.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-12464427
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    A GP doesn't need to need to know the name of every rare disorder under the sun - this is why we have specialists. Even then I've come across specialists coming across a disorder they've never heard of before.
    You're forced to go through GPs and they still get paid unless they really screw up.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Coffinman)
    You're forced to go through GPs and they still get paid unless they really screw up.
    Of course you are, otherwise people will use secondary care completely inappropriately. Only a small minority need specialist referral.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    Then how would you get prompt healthcare before symptoms got severe. How can you be properly informed of a condition,without resorting to internet research, so you can get it treated elsewhere if you can afford it?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Coffinman)
    Then how would you get prompt healthcare before symptoms got severe. How can you be properly informed of a condition,without resorting to internet research, so you can get it treated elsewhere if you can afford it?
    You clearly are misinformed of the healthcare system that operates in this country, that whilst may have its setbacks, will ensure you are seen by an appropriate medical professional when required - usually this is the GP who will treat you in the community, and doctors from other specialties in certain cases. The doctor who diagnoses the condition or receives results of some form will be in charge of explaining the condition and answering questions you may have, as well as pointing you in the directions of appropriate resources to take home, as not all details can be covered in the time pressures that operate.

    The main barrier to people not receiving prompt healthcare is themselves - not presenting for a variety of reasons (including trying to self-diagnose and manage, often with very poor results).

    However, I'm not being dragged further down argument lane, as there is little point in explaining things to people who don't wish to truly listen. I and many others could write essays or even textbooks about the questions being asked - yet people will still not be satisfied for any number of reasons.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mushi_master)
    You clearly are misinformed of the healthcare system that operates in this country, that whilst may have its setbacks, will ensure you are seen by an appropriate medical professional when required - usually this is the GP who will treat you in the community, and doctors from other specialties in certain cases. The doctor who diagnoses the condition or receives results of some form will be in charge of explaining the condition and answering questions you may have, as well as pointing you in the directions of appropriate resources to take home, as not all details can be covered in the time pressures that operate.
    But if a GP is not a specialist and wouldn't know until he sent you to a specialist then that causes something of a conundrum.
    The main barrier to people not receiving prompt healthcare is themselves - not presenting for a variety of reasons (including trying to self-diagnose and manage, often with very poor results).
    Which is contradicted by the people who have had to go umpteen times to GPs before getting diagnosed properly.
    However, I'm not being dragged further down argument lane, as there is little point in explaining things to people who don't wish to truly listen. I and many others could write essays or even textbooks about the questions being asked - yet people will still not be satisfied for any number of reasons.
    I think you just want people to agree with you in face of contradictory evidence.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I think some GP's are really bad at their job, or they just don't care.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MENDACIUM)
    The majority of doctors are competent, but the issue is that neither doctors nor the NHS are perfect. I have tried to give my doctors a fair reflection, but there truly are very few redeeming qualities. One may think this is just from me but there have been extreme cases of negligence - not making honest mistakes. From G.P'S, whole hospitals ect. It's more prevelant than you would think it is. In my case, doctors failed to give a treadmill test to someone who had extreme palpitations and breathlessness upon performing exercise. I am not asking for a diagnosis on sight. I am asking for doctors not to spend two years doing point-less examinations, giving me anti-biotics on and off for two years, not doing to the tests required and such. If I truly never needed a treadmill test, why give it to me eventually? The third world countries have public and private hospitals. Just because we may be lucky to get a free and relatively good NHS does not allow doctors or healthcare professionals to be absolutely and utterly negligent, rude, patronising ect.
    Doctors don't care what you think.

    If your uninformed opinion was remotely important then they would be taking classes on asking patients on what they think is important.

    Also, you are free to sue if they have actually committed negligence.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sgt.Incontro)
    Yep, purely my own personal experience. I think I have switched between at least 5 GP's (and counting lol) within the past few months alone. Probably more.




    For the following reasons:
    A) Numbers - if half a dozen specialists are telling you the same advice, but your GP insists the opposite - who are you going to believe?

    B) Applied knowledge - GP's can also have a very wide band of knowledge - but remember that specialists have been studying the same specific area of knowledge for years and years. Very good ones are almost always involved in research - writing papers etc...

    Lucky for you. Send some of your GP's over to my area :rolleyes:



    Not necessarily. Also remember that I could be in the field myself, but be a very crappy doctor. Just because you are in the field never necessarily equates to having sufficient knowledge. There will always be others in the same field who will know much more, and much LESS.
    What problem do you have that requires you to see a specialist?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Coffinman)
    But if a GP is not a specialist and wouldn't know until he sent you to a specialist then that causes something of a conundrum. Which is contradicted by the people who have had to go umpteen times to GPs before getting diagnosed properly. I think you just want people to agree with you in face of contradictory evidence.
    No, in fact I believe you just want me to agree to some very flimsy anecdotal evidence.

    A GP does not have to be a specialist - they are medical doctors with a huge wealth of experience and training, don't insult the profession by stating they wouldn't know if something was serious. Without you having knowledge of any actual medicine I'm afraid you are in no position to state whether people have been 'diagnosed properly' or not.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DorianGrayism)
    Doctors don't care what you think.

    If your uninformed opinion was remotely important then they would be taking classes on asking patients on what they think is important.

    Also, you are free to sue if they have actually committed negligence.
    The process of suing takes incredible ammounts of effort and energy - something most people do not have. Eitherway, i know in their hearts the doctors did not intend to do wrong , they do care, but it was negligence.


    Furthermore, most doctor are absolutely competent, but your statement should not encompass all doctors. Many are struck-off every year, proving my point that there can be very negligent and un-safe doctors. Many misdiagnose due to negligence on top of that.

    So doctors need to be more accountable, and i support any reforms - and there are many- to re-test doctors and make them much more accountable.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by madfish)
    yea,

    Doctors a definitely losing their respect in society (by me anyway)

    I think they should raise the entry requirements in all med schools from AAA to A*A*AA or something very very hard to get. (only a minority of people in society would get this, which would mean A LOT less donkeys would apply for med school)

    This would mean only the academic elites would have the ability to be a doctor ( you may argue that academia is not everything blah blah... shut up. If you are not smart I don't want you deciding what illness I have.)

    To be frank, some of the people that went on to medicine at my school were complete dumb asses I wouldn't let them look after my gold fish never mind my health

    EDIT: I know my views are most likely frowned upon as you would think that I am "just jealous"... this is not case... I want to be a Chemical Engineer, not a medical doctor...I have never considered being a medical doctor as that type of work does not appeal to me
    The idea that A level results = intelligence at medicine is ridiculous. 90% of the patients coming through their doors probably have either an infection or some stress related symptoms, thus treating it simply with no side effects isn't such a bad idea. Also if you only let, say, the top 500 students in the UK study medicine, more of your doctors are going to be bookworms or foreign students who don't speak English properly.

    So hear this, as a medical student who got in with LESS than A*A*AA - SHUT UP
 
 
 
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: April 5, 2014
Poll
Should MenACWY vaccination be compulsory at uni?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.