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    Hello I'm new to the student room so I'm not quite sure what I'm doing but I'm looking for some help! I can't decide on my firm choice for uni, between Animal Science at Notts and Biovet at RVC. I've been told that animal science isn't as highly regarded as biovet by employers and that Biovet can lead to 'better career opportunities'.
    I love the Notts campus but the course doesn't seem as strong, and i like the look of the course at RVC but wasn't that keen on the campus (I prefer green spaces :P)....so i was wondering if anybody had any opinions/experience of either and could advise me anything would be a big help!
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    Don't really know much about biovet but I am in my final year doing Animal Science (not at Notts though), and as far as graduate jobs go, I've had friends offered jobs in the BBC, animal nutrition, farm consults, and some are doing masters in welfare and livestock research and I have got a place for vet med next year.

    It will all depend on what you think you want to go into. Biovet is probably more research science based whereas Animal Science for me was more farm and husbandry based and gave more of an understanding of applied science ina more practical environment such as farm and companion animal breeding, nutrition and welfare but was still had a heavy biochemistry side to it.

    At the end of the day, its not just what employers want, you have to be happy doing what you do and where you living for 3 years.

    Hope this helps a bit.
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    (Original post by Naivasha)
    Don't really know much about biovet but I am in my final year doing Animal Science (not at Notts though), and as far as graduate jobs go, I've had friends offered jobs in the BBC, animal nutrition, farm consults, and some are doing masters in welfare and livestock research and I have got a place for vet med next year.

    It will all depend on what you think you want to go into. Biovet is probably more research science based whereas Animal Science for me was more farm and husbandry based and gave more of an understanding of applied science ina more practical environment such as farm and companion animal breeding, nutrition and welfare but was still had a heavy biochemistry side to it.

    At the end of the day, its not just what employers want, you have to be happy doing what you do and where you living for 3 years.

    Hope this helps a bit.
    Thanks for your reply I think the problem is that i don't know what i want to go into :/ I originally wanted to do vet med but i just don't get the grades for me to apply to it (i'm predicted ABB in Geography, Biology and Chemisty) I do like the idea of the more practical based animal science course, but again i have no idea what i want to do except do vet med but that is no longer an option. Congratulations on your offer though! You must be so pleased
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    I did animal science at Nottm, and am now at the RVC and have quite a lot of friends who have either done biovet and are now on vetmed (a verrry long, expensive route - I wouldn't recommend it!) or who are going biovet now.

    I would say what has been said already is pretty true - in my opinion from what I have seen there is generally more of a focus on the husbandry/health/welfare etc side of things as Nottm, whereas much more of the biovet is research type stuff, and more 'pure' anatomy/physiology. That's not to say there isn't overlap - there is, and depending on the modules you choose in your 2nd/3rd year you can def push each degree a bit more towards the other.

    Personally I would say I have heard of more people getting jobs within the related field from biovet than my year did with animal science, but that might just have been my year. RVC have a lot of opportunities to do research studentships in the summer etc, which can be invaluable on your CV - again, Nottm prob do as well, but I def wasn't as aware of them being offered as much as they are here. There is also the chance with RVC to do external modules, for example with Kings College London.

    If I had my chance again, I would go biovet, but that is knowing now what I enjoy, and I understand it is difficult to decide what you will like before you start! Maybe see if you can find out a bit more about the modules that each course offers and see which appeal to you more.

    Don't let the green space thing put you off RVC either. Yes, it is in the middle of London - but that in itself can be a fantastic chance in itself, to live in the captial city for a couple of years, with no obligation of having to tie yourself to a job or house here. There are plenty of green spaces/parks around, so particularly in the summer it is easy to see some greenery. Depending on the modules you pick, some (quite a lot)people move out to HH for 3rd year (and some people even 2nd as well), as a lot of modules in later years are based here. It is also really easy to get out of london when you want to, either to go home, visit friends or other places (often with clubs etc as well).

    In all...there are pros and cons to both. Have you visited both? If not, try to do so, and speak to people on the courses.
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    Hi,

    I'm another one who has done Animal Science (at UWE though) and I have had the same experience, animal science being more hands on husbandry, nutrition, breeding etc, whereas the bio vets did more lab based work. I thought I'd add my experiences of applying for jobs. I personally found I was disadvantaged when applying for jobs in labs, I applied to lots of veterinary labs dealing with samples for example, I simply hadn't covered all the techniques they wanted. But equally I was at an advantage for anything that involved hands on work with the animals. This is only my experience from my uni and classmates though. A few of my animal science classmates are working in zoos or with wildlife. However there are always masters and then phd's you can consider afterwards as well to specialise or broaden your skills, we were all hugely encouraged to consider post grad education.

    Anyway hope this helps a bit!
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    (Original post by kookabura)
    I did animal science at Nottm, and am now at the RVC and have quite a lot of friends who have either done biovet and are now on vetmed (a verrry long, expensive route - I wouldn't recommend it!) or who are going biovet now.

    I would say what has been said already is pretty true - in my opinion from what I have seen there is generally more of a focus on the husbandry/health/welfare etc side of things as Nottm, whereas much more of the biovet is research type stuff, and more 'pure' anatomy/physiology. That's not to say there isn't overlap - there is, and depending on the modules you choose in your 2nd/3rd year you can def push each degree a bit more towards the other.

    Personally I would say I have heard of more people getting jobs within the related field from biovet than my year did with animal science, but that might just have been my year. RVC have a lot of opportunities to do research studentships in the summer etc, which can be invaluable on your CV - again, Nottm prob do as well, but I def wasn't as aware of them being offered as much as they are here. There is also the chance with RVC to do external modules, for example with Kings College London.

    If I had my chance again, I would go biovet, but that is knowing now what I enjoy, and I understand it is difficult to decide what you will like before you start! Maybe see if you can find out a bit more about the modules that each course offers and see which appeal to you more.

    Don't let the green space thing put you off RVC either. Yes, it is in the middle of London - but that in itself can be a fantastic chance in itself, to live in the captial city for a couple of years, with no obligation of having to tie yourself to a job or house here. There are plenty of green spaces/parks around, so particularly in the summer it is easy to see some greenery. Depending on the modules you pick, some (quite a lot)people move out to HH for 3rd year (and some people even 2nd as well), as a lot of modules in later years are based here. It is also really easy to get out of london when you want to, either to go home, visit friends or other places (often with clubs etc as well).

    In all...there are pros and cons to both. Have you visited both? If not, try to do so, and speak to people on the courses.
    Thanks for your reply how are you liking the RVC? Is it biovet you're doing? I was considering living in the student village on HH and commuting in (purely because it works out cheaper and i wouldn't be studying and living with the same people) but didn't know if this would be too difficult? (Sorry for all the questions :P)
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    (Original post by Eevee13)
    Hi,

    I'm another one who has done Animal Science (at UWE though) and I have had the same experience, animal science being more hands on husbandry, nutrition, breeding etc, whereas the bio vets did more lab based work. I thought I'd add my experiences of applying for jobs. I personally found I was disadvantaged when applying for jobs in labs, I applied to lots of veterinary labs dealing with samples for example, I simply hadn't covered all the techniques they wanted. But equally I was at an advantage for anything that involved hands on work with the animals. This is only my experience from my uni and classmates though. A few of my animal science classmates are working in zoos or with wildlife. However there are always masters and then phd's you can consider afterwards as well to specialise or broaden your skills, we were all hugely encouraged to consider post grad education.

    Anyway hope this helps a bit!
    Thankyou! that did help, at least i know now what sort of careers i can expect from them both when i was asking the Uni's they wouldn't really give me a straight answer :P
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    (Original post by j-louise)
    Thanks for your reply how are you liking the RVC? Is it biovet you're doing? I was considering living in the student village on HH and commuting in (purely because it works out cheaper and i wouldn't be studying and living with the same people) but didn't know if this would be too difficult? (Sorry for all the questions :P)
    I'm on the vet degree at RVC now. So not doing biovet, but like I said...have some friends who are on the course now, and some friends on the vet course who did biovet first.

    There are some people who like in the student village and commute to Camden - I wouldn't say a huge number of first years tbh, but there are some. There are def people in other years who do that though - either because they don't like living in London, have some of their course based out here, or for other reasons (such as having a horse/pet, which is obv easier if you live in Potters Bar and commute into Camden). I think from what people have said, moneywise it is about the same - rent is a lot cheaper out of london, so that offsets your increased travel costs. And, assuming it is the same as previous years, HH pay something towards a monthly rail card. Have you seen the halls at HH? They are really nice!!

    People generally end up living in a mix of places anyway - Mary B, College Grove, HH, private rented, intercollegiate halls and at home - so its not like you would be the only person not in one set of halls. People are generally pretty good about friends crashing at theirs after a night out/social if you don't want to/can't get back to HH. Freshers week generally put coaches on from HH for most of the events as well.

    The main thing I would say is whether the travel time would annoy you - time from campus to Potters Bar train station (there is a shuttle bus, but will take you 15 mins or so. Then train to Kings Cross and then walk from there to Camden - you're probably looking at maybe just under an hour, if things run on time. But obviously snow/broken down trains/cancelled trains etc can make that longer! But like I say, you probably wouldnt be the only one travelling in.
 
 
 
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