Join TSR now to have your say on this topicSign up now

What social class do you consider yourself to be? Watch

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    This is an interesting paper on Marxist notions of class
    http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/~wright/Foundations.pdf

    (although its been several years since I read it)
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    scum
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    The Subject Class.

    I find it depressing how the so-called British 'middle class' strains every muscle to separate themselves from what is known as the British 'working class' and strongly aspires to be the part of upper class, therefore accept every opportunity possible to eat of the hands of the bourgeois 1%.

    Living in post-Communist Poland I never really understood the concept of social class division, yet now I entirely sympathize with the failed architecture of what was to become a new order in the relations of production as I find class division little better than master-slave relations.

    - Totally apolitical LSE law student
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Not meaning this in an offensive way, but are you 1st generation immigrants into the UK? I ask because that definitely has a bearing on social class perceptions. I presume migrants bring their original social class with them from their own country, but perceptions of many migrant groups within the UK tend to push them down into the working class.
    i may be wrong seeing as i'm not completely sure what this means, but i think my mum was a first generation immigrant although her mum lived here but she never grew up with her. but yeah, my mum has lived here for a while (although born here she grew up in nigeria till graduating uni then came here) and my dad only moved here once they got married. not sure what this means though?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Many people running 'trade' businesses earn large amounts (maybe not so much during the recession), it isn't uncommon for figures like £100K+ to be earned by people like builders where they run the company. Running a business does not automatically make you middle class.
    If he's running a trade business and employing people he's not a builder. A working class builder=a man working on site. I should know, my dad's one. How you can call a man who owns a building company a builder is beyond me. He's certainly not working class (in my eyes). You may be a blue blooded puritan but I think it's pretty clear that a businessman who earns 100K is not working class. I've seen you on here and always liked what you say, but I think you're idea of the class system reminds me of Bingleys sisters in Pride and Prejudice ('He's from Cheapside!'). I don't think it reflects reality.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EvilOfficer)
    The Subject Class.

    I find it depressing how the so-called British 'middle class' strains every muscle to separate themselves from what is known as the British 'working class' and strongly aspires to be the part of upper class, therefore accept every opportunity possible to eat of the hands of the bourgeois 1%.

    Living in post-Communist Poland I never really understood the concept of social class division, yet now I entirely sympathize with the failed architecture of what was to become a new order in the relations of production as I find class division little better than master-slave relations.

    - Totally apolitical LSE law student
    The middle class betrayed the real wealth creators in the 1980s and has been licking the toes of the ruling class ever since.

    Welcome to the UK !
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SpottedZebra)
    It's an interesting question. Some people believe that you stay the class you are born, and other people say that you can change class according to changing qualifications, lifestyle, beliefs etc.
    My dad for example grew up in a very working class family and went on to graduate with a doctorate, does this make him now middle class? Or do his working class roots make him working class for the rest of his life? That's a hard question to answer.
    So does it depend on your parents? If so does it not ever change through the family or does it depend on your parents lifestyle when you were born, so a person born lower-middle class could get a good job, meaning thier child would be born middle-middle and if thier child also got a good job then the next gen would be upper middle etc.? Interesting questions
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I'm working class me like
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bebbybubbles99)
    So does it depend on your parents? If so does it not ever change through the family or does it depend on your parents lifestyle when you were born, so a person born lower-middle class could get a good job, meaning thier child would be born middle-middle and if thier child also got a good job then the next gen would be upper middle etc.? Interesting questions
    relationship to capital
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Upper class, take that society.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Working class, possibly lower middle. I think I was middle class until my parents divorced, then dropped down to working class (as my mum earns next to nothing and I lived with her). I can definitely feel a difference in what I expect of my parents and what I have compared to other people. I used to feel very self-conscious at school, as all my friends had nicer houses, expected holidays abroad every year and their parents just generally paid for things.

    I don't really care now though. In some ways, I think it's been quite good for me, very grounding. Some people at uni are fairly oblivious to how little money some people have. Not everyone, but some people do live in a bit of a bubble. I feel like I've seen fairly different sides of life and quite a range of people - that may be more to do with me/my experiences rather than my specific class though. Although it's a generalisation, I do think that people who've come from working class backgrounds, have gone to university and got a well-paid job generally appreciate it more than those who've had a middle class lifestyle and expect it from the beginning. Obviously though, it's more likely you'll get a well-paid job to being with if you've been born into a middle class rather than working class family.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SophiaKeuning)
    If he's running a trade business and employing people he's not a builder. A working class builder=a man working on site. I should know, my dad's one. How you can call a man who owns a building company a builder is beyond me. He's certainly not working class (in my eyes). You may be a blue blooded puritan but I think it's pretty clear that a businessman who earns 100K is not working class. I've seen you on here and always liked what you say, but I think you're idea of the class system reminds me of Bingleys sisters in Pride and Prejudice ('He's from Cheapside!'). I don't think it reflects reality.
    Thanks for the latter bit - I will carry on reading my Jane Austen! :rolleyes:

    Seriously, I think it depends on the nature of the business and to some extent I agree with you, but surely in this country (and others) social class is about more than just economic relations. It's about self-identification and the cultural and political views, activities and outlook that people have. I was listening to Suggsie from Madness on TV earlier. Everything about him radiates working class and identification with the working class - his songs, accent, views, etc - and he says he's working class. He's also very rich and runs a very well known business. Admittedly he is a more unusual example, but do you not accept that people's self-identification and cultural views have a role?

    What I'm not doing (and I wish other people wouldn't as well) is seeking to define other people's class for them, however, one can make general observations about class without it being an attempt to restore a 19th century view of the subject. Plainly some successful people choose to retain, or do retain, the social class of their childhood. Others seek to leave it behind and 'change'.

    The really interesting subject that we could discuss is to what extent university education actually changes or can change someone's social class, or reinforce it.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bourgeoisie)
    Upper class, take that society.
    Somehow your username gives away a serious interest in this topic.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Maybe it matters less to some people, but it's still clearly a big deal in the UK. We have class-based newspapers, class-divided TV channels and shows, class-separated universities (they shouldn't be, but they seem to be) and class-based food, music, supermarkets, culture and entertainment.
    There's just too much emphasis on 'class'. It's only a label and serves no purpose. When anyone asks me what class I consider myself, I tell them to jog on. Pointless.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by midnightice)
    There's just too much emphasis on 'class'. It's only a label and serves no purpose. When anyone asks me what class I consider myself, I tell them to jog on. Pointless.
    OK. Where do you shop? And which newspaper(s) do you prefer to read?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm working class through and through. Proud of it too.
    Both my parents worked in factories and we had all we ever needed.
    Appreciated the value of money. Neither took days off sick.
    My job now is probably classed as middle class.
    If I have children, they may be classed as middle class, which is fine by me because they will have my working class values which I appreciate and value.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    workin class


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    OK. Where do you shop? And which newspaper(s) do you prefer to read?
    I shop online, mainly Gucci, Ralph Lauren and Rolex, anything society considers to be of elite value. I read The Guardian because it oozes sophistication and is the epitome of toff centricity. All of this clearly makes me a superior being and a label really adds value to my existence...

    Seriously, why does ANY of this matter? Why try and ascertain my label by attaching it to predetermined stereotypes? I don't want to preach socialism or anything, but the UK emphasis on class is a perfect example of how Capitalism has destroyed our sense of humanity.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Working class. My single mother stayed at home to raise me until I was 10, worked part time as a gardner for my grandmother to allow the flexibility. Had two/three jobs at any one time to try and keep the rent paid etc. (Been out of work for so long she had to start at the bottom again!) I started "working", babysitting etc when I was thirteen to try and help out at home. Me and my mum are a team. I'm not ashamed of my class and I feel it has moulded me to the person I am today. Things haven't always been easy and I used to often wonder "how the other half lived." I've got friends from various classes and it's never gotten in the way though
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Somehow your username gives away a serious interest in this topic.
    More interested in you than the entire topic tbh :rolleyes:
 
 
 
Poll
Which web browser do you use?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.