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    Hi,

    At present, I have a normal digital camera (nothing special) but I'd like to upgrade to a nicer camera which would allow me to pursue photography as a hobby. I would like to learn about all the different settings and so would prefer a camera which has quite a few functions to play around with.

    However, I'm torn between getting a DSLR or an ILC. Previously I was set on buying a DSLR (was looking at the Canon 550D or the 600D), but a friend of mine pointed out that the up-and-coming ILCs are just as good as DSLRs. As a result, in the past few days, I've been looking at comparisons between DSLRs and ILCs and there are many similarities between the two!

    So for someone who would like to get into photography as a hobby, with a budget of around £600 max for the camera + one set of lens, what model/type of camera would you recommend? I plan on using this camera on holiday and also just for general phototaking (so I don't really need a high fps!). Someone recommended the Sony Nex 6- what is the general consensus around this model? It's a little over my budget, but I could wait a little longer (maybe until Summer) for the price to hopefully drop a little bit.

    Thanks for your help!
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    I'm slightly confused: a DSLR is an ILC...
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    I'm slightly confused: a DSLR is an ILC...
    Errr, have I been rambling on about nonsense? I'll post two links to the two 'types' of camera.

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=e...d%3B1280%3B960 - The Canon 600D (what I classed as a DSLR)

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=ni...%3B1600%3B1309 - The Sony NEX 6 (what I classed as an ILC)

    Does this make my question any clearer?
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    (Original post by StaedtlerNoris)
    Errr, have I been rambling on about nonsense? I'll post two links to the two 'types' of camera.

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=e...d%3B1280%3B960 - The Canon 600D (what I classed as a DSLR)

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=ni...%3B1600%3B1309 - The Sony NEX 6 (what I classed as an ILC)

    Does this make my question any clearer?
    Ah, that does clarify things, yes. Both of those are ILCs, in that with both of them you can change the lens, 'ILC' meaning 'interchangeable lens camera'. The NEX-6 is what I would call a compact system camera but it also has many other names. What differentiates DSLRs and CSCs is the viewfinder. A DSLR takes advantage of mirrors to enable you to look directly through the lens; a CSC is an electronic viewfinder (evidenced in another name, 'electronic viewfinder with interchangeable lens'.)

    Moving on from semantics...

    It depends what you want to do with it. CSCs still don't quite meet the image quality of DSLRs and (particularly with one of the big companies like Canon or Nikon) you get a far wider range of lenses with DSLRs. However, you pay for it in camera size - I wouldn't take my DSLR out with me for general use, it's a special event camera.

    The NEX-6 has a pretty big sensor, comparable to entry level DSLRs, and is a lot smaller in body size, making it better for general use ... which you do mention. Suppose it depends on how general is 'general'?
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    Ah, that does clarify things, yes. Both of those are ILCs, in that with both of them you can change the lens, 'ILC' meaning 'interchangeable lens camera'. The NEX-6 is what I would call a compact system camera but it also has many other names. What differentiates DSLRs and CSCs is the viewfinder. A DSLR takes advantage of mirrors to enable you to look directly through the lens; a CSC is an electronic viewfinder (evidenced in another name, 'electronic viewfinder with interchangeable lens'.)

    Moving on from semantics...

    It depends what you want to do with it. CSCs still don't quite meet the image quality of DSLRs and (particularly with one of the big companies like Canon or Nikon) you get a far wider range of lenses with DSLRs. However, you pay for it in camera size - I wouldn't take my DSLR out with me for general use, it's a special event camera.

    The NEX-6 has a pretty big sensor, comparable to entry level DSLRs, and is a lot smaller in body size, making it better for general use ... which you do mention. Suppose it depends on how general is 'general'?
    Aha, thanks for clarifying that one! Though strangely enough, when you type in 'DSLR vs ...', DSLR vs ILC is the first search (or somewhere near the top anyway) so I blame google!

    I'm so confused. I asked two of my friends, who both are quite interested in photography and one said that the NEX-6 (or other similar cameras) will take very similar photos to a typical DSLR and that it is definitely better as photo quality is not compromised and it is more compact. Whereas my other friend said that DSLRs will undoubtedly produce better photos and that cameras like the NEX-6 are kind of an 'upgrade' to the point-and-shoot typed cameras. So you would also agree that cameras like the NEX-6 (despite its cost) is still inferior to the Canon 600D?

    I think one main reason for wanting a camera is because I'm going to America/Canada this summer and I'd like a nice camera to well...take photos. So I was planning on buying a camera around July, which would give me around a month to play around with the camera. As you'd imagine, I would use the camera to take photos of the landscape and perhaps special buildings/places/wildlife related things. So I don't think the added bulk of the 600D would matter much in this situation.

    However what I mean by 'general' use is that it would be nice to be able to take the camera out whenever I go out and for that to be possible- it would need to be relatively compact. And that's why I'm unsure what to get. It would be nice to be able to get a camera which is relatively compact so I could take it with me wherever I go, however I'm worried that if I get the DSLR, that may not be possible But I don't want to buy the NEX-6 and then regret that I've bought an inferior camera which doesn't take very good photos. I hope you understand my dilemma!
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    (Original post by StaedtlerNoris)
    Aha, thanks for clarifying that one! Though strangely enough, when you type in 'DSLR vs ...', DSLR vs ILC is the first search (or somewhere near the top anyway) so I blame google!

    I'm so confused. I asked two of my friends, who both are quite interested in photography and one said that the NEX-6 (or other similar cameras) will take very similar photos to a typical DSLR and that it is definitely better as photo quality is not compromised and it is more compact. Whereas my other friend said that DSLRs will undoubtedly produce better photos and that cameras like the NEX-6 are kind of an 'upgrade' to the point-and-shoot typed cameras. So you would also agree that cameras like the NEX-6 (despite its cost) is still inferior to the Canon 600D?

    I think one main reason for wanting a camera is because I'm going to America/Canada this summer and I'd like a nice camera to well...take photos. So I was planning on buying a camera around July, which would give me around a month to play around with the camera. As you'd imagine, I would use the camera to take photos of the landscape and perhaps special buildings/places/wildlife related things. So I don't think the added bulk of the 600D would matter much in this situation.

    However what I mean by 'general' use is that it would be nice to be able to take the camera out whenever I go out and for that to be possible- it would need to be relatively compact. And that's why I'm unsure what to get. It would be nice to be able to get a camera which is relatively compact so I could take it with me wherever I go, however I'm worried that if I get the DSLR, that may not be possible But I don't want to buy the NEX-6 and then regret that I've bought an inferior camera which doesn't take very good photos. I hope you understand my dilemma!
    Personally, yes I would agree with that.

    How about going for a small DSLR? Something like an 1100D (get it with the 'kit lens', which is a good general purpose lens) and then also add a longer, telephoto lens like the 55-250mm for things like the wildlife. Gives you the image quality of a DSLR without all of the bulk, although it will still be bulkier than a CSC. Seeing as you're not planning on treks through the wilderness, you don't need a whacking rucksack for it - something like this would be perfectly fine.

    However, I'd get it more than a month before my intended use. DSLRs take a bit more skill to get the best from them, I think getting it around about now wouldn't seem over-kill so you have a chance to learn about how to take the best pictures and using things like raw formatting and composition interest.
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    Personally, yes I would agree with that.

    How about going for a small DSLR? Something like an 1100D (get it with the 'kit lens', which is a good general purpose lens) and then also add a longer, telephoto lens like the 55-250mm for things like the wildlife. Gives you the image quality of a DSLR without all of the bulk, although it will still be bulkier than a CSC. Seeing as you're not planning on treks through the wilderness, you don't need a whacking rucksack for it - something like this would be perfectly fine.

    However, I'd get it more than a month before my intended use. DSLRs take a bit more skill to get the best from them, I think getting it around about now wouldn't seem over-kill so you have a chance to learn about how to take the best pictures and using things like raw formatting and composition interest.
    I think you've convinced me to purchase a DSLR instead of a camera similar to the NEX-6 as I realised that I'd be paying a lot more money...for potentially a not-so-good photo quality.

    What are the main differences between that and say the Canon 600D? (I'm just quoting the 600D as I know a fair bit about it!) I always assumed that a higher number = either newer or better Ooh, I haven't thought about getting a telefocus lens. This is probably a stupid question, but the telefocus lens wouldn't fit in that bag would it? Yeah I've seen quite a few bags like that, though that one does look very good! If you don't mind me asking, what camera/lens do you have? And what type of photos do you tend to take? (Could you perhaps attach a photo? )

    In an ideal world, I would get it now. However I've got my A2 exams this June and I really don't want to distract myself, so I think getting it in July would be the best bet. A few of my friends have offered to help me with my new camera, e.g. showing me the different functions and etc which is nice!
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    I'm slightly confused: a DSLR is an ILC...
    No. An ILC contains no mirror or prism which is why they are much smaller... There is rarely an optical viewfinder on an ILC. ILCs have live view permanently enabled.
    They are very different.
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    (Original post by lmsavk)
    No. An ILC contains no mirror or prism which is why they are much smaller... There is rarely an optical viewfinder on an ILC. ILCs have live view permanently enabled.
    They are very different.
    What's your view on the matter- DSLR or ILC?
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    (Original post by lmsavk)
    No. An ILC contains no mirror or prism which is why they are much smaller... There is rarely an optical viewfinder on an ILC. ILCs have live view permanently enabled.
    They are very different.
    You missed her point. DSLRs are by definition also ILCs, because the lenses on DSLRs are interchangeable. CSC is a much better acronym.

    To the OP. In terms of raw image quality, Sony CSCs produce very similar images to other 1.5/1.6 crop-sensor cameras, purely because the sensor is of a decent size and Sony A-mount lenses are of a decent quality. Panasonic and Olympus CSCs use a smaller sensor, and as such, their image quality is compromised somewhat.

    In terms of actually taking pictures, however, 'proper' DSLRs make it much easier to actually control what's going on. the Nex series of cameras are basically glorified compacts with horribly stunted manual controls hidden in menus with soft keys and scrollers. DSLRs have the majority of their controls operated via buttons and wheels which makes life a lot easier. There are also far more lenses available for Canon and Nikon compared to the Sony A-mount. If I were you, I'd get the DSLR. If you're worried about size, pick up a decent compact too when you have the money. I got hold of a Canon PowerShot A3300 from the Canon refurb eBay store for half retail price, to compliment my Canon 50D. Image quality certainly isn't up there with a DSLR, but it gives me a certain level of control and returns nice images.
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    (Original post by Nuffles)
    You missed her point. DSLRs are by definition also ILCs, because the lenses on DSLRs are interchangeable. CSC is a much better acronym.

    To the OP. In terms of raw image quality, Sony CSCs produce very similar images to other 1.5/1.6 crop-sensor cameras, purely because the sensor is of a decent size and Sony A-mount lenses are of a decent quality. Panasonic and Olympus CSCs use a smaller sensor, and as such, their image quality is compromised somewhat.

    In terms of actually taking pictures, however, 'proper' DSLRs make it much easier to actually control what's going on. the Nex series of cameras are basically glorified compacts with horribly stunted manual controls hidden in menus with soft keys and scrollers. DSLRs have the majority of their controls operated via buttons and wheels which makes life a lot easier. There are also far more lenses available for Canon and Nikon compared to the Sony A-mount. If I were you, I'd get the DSLR. If you're worried about size, pick up a decent compact too when you have the money. I got hold of a Canon PowerShot A3300 from the Canon refurb eBay store for half retail price, to compliment my Canon 50D. Image quality certainly isn't up there with a DSLR, but it gives me a certain level of control and returns nice images.
    I've got a lot more reading to do as I don't fully understand what you are saying, but okay I think the main reason why the Sony CSCs were so appealing is because firstly they're compact and I thought that they would produce the same quality photos. As if that is the case, then it would save me carrying two cameras around (like you mentioned) as that one would be both small and effective at what it does. But doesn't the Sony NEX have a spinny wheel on the top of the camera? Also, a concern which was raised by my friend was that DSLRs are on the process of being 'phased out'. How true is this? As I don't want to invest in a camera, just to be told that in about a years time, everyone will have smaller cameras like the Sony CSCs Though I am leaning towards the DSLR despite its disadvantages.
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    (Original post by StaedtlerNoris)
    I've got a lot more reading to do as I don't fully understand what you are saying, but okay I think the main reason why the Sony CSCs were so appealing is because firstly they're compact and I thought that they would produce the same quality photos. As if that is the case, then it would save me carrying two cameras around (like you mentioned) as that one would be both small and effective at what it does. But doesn't the Sony NEX have a spinny wheel on the top of the camera? Also, a concern which was raised by my friend was that DSLRs are on the process of being 'phased out'. How true is this? As I don't want to invest in a camera, just to be told that in about a years time, everyone will have smaller cameras like the Sony CSCs Though I am leaning towards the DSLR despite its disadvantages.
    I don't tend to actually carry two cameras with me, rather take whichever suits what I'm doing best. Photographing a gig? DSLR. Going out and getting smashed with mates? Compact.

    DSLRs will never get phased out, IMO. They might well get pushed back upmarket, with CSCs taking over the amateur market, but I don't think pros will ever totally leave DSLRs. There are too many advantages to larger cameras with more buttons and better ergonomics. I'll be keeping hold of my DSLR style for cameras for a good while yet.
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    (Original post by Nuffles)
    I don't tend to actually carry two cameras with me, rather take whichever suits what I'm doing best. Photographing a gig? DSLR. Going out and getting smashed with mates? Compact.

    DSLRs will never get phased out, IMO. They might well get pushed back upmarket, with CSCs taking over the amateur market, but I don't think pros will ever totally leave DSLRs. There are too many advantages to larger cameras with more buttons and better ergonomics. I'll be keeping hold of my DSLR style for cameras for a good while yet.
    Ah I see what you mean. I think for what I intend to do, carrying around a DSLR shouldn't be too much of a burden. You do make a good point, it's just a little concerning how quickly the CSCs are improving and as the DSLRs are more 'affordable' it just raised concerns that they're not longer as desirable. Thanks for all your help!
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    (Original post by Nuffles)
    I don't tend to actually carry two cameras with me, rather take whichever suits what I'm doing best. Photographing a gig? DSLR. Going out and getting smashed with mates? Compact.

    DSLRs will never get phased out, IMO. They might well get pushed back upmarket, with CSCs taking over the amateur market, but I don't think pros will ever totally leave DSLRs. There are too many advantages to larger cameras with more buttons and better ergonomics. I'll be keeping hold of my DSLR style for cameras for a good while yet.
    Hi, I have one more question about cameras and was wondering whether you could help. Most of the camera + lens bundles contain the 18-55mm lens which is about £200 cheaper than the camera with the 18-135mm. Is it worth the £200 upgrade? As I was thinking about buying the camera with a 18-55mm lens and then when I have gotten to grips with it, I could have the choice of getting a telefocus lens. Would you recommend getting the 18-135mm straight away? Also, the telefocus lens tends to go to 250mm, does it mean getting the 18-55mm + telefocus is better than the 18-135mm, or do you not tend to use 135-250mm? Thanks again!
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    (Original post by StaedtlerNoris)
    I think you've convinced me to purchase a DSLR instead of a camera similar to the NEX-6 as I realised that I'd be paying a lot more money...for potentially a not-so-good photo quality.

    What are the main differences between that and say the Canon 600D? (I'm just quoting the 600D as I know a fair bit about it!) I always assumed that a higher number = either newer or better Ooh, I haven't thought about getting a telefocus lens. This is probably a stupid question, but the telefocus lens wouldn't fit in that bag would it? Yeah I've seen quite a few bags like that, though that one does look very good! If you don't mind me asking, what camera/lens do you have? And what type of photos do you tend to take? (Could you perhaps attach a photo? )

    In an ideal world, I would get it now. However I've got my A2 exams this June and I really don't want to distract myself, so I think getting it in July would be the best bet. A few of my friends have offered to help me with my new camera, e.g. showing me the different functions and etc which is nice!
    The 600D comes with more megapixels than the 1100D, but 12 megapixels is more than enough (about 8 MP gives you a good A4 sized print) unless you plan to be cropping photos to a high degree. Beyond that, there are few differences.

    The 1100D belongs to the entry level range, whereas the 600D is in a higher range of entry level DSLRs ... but (at least until you get to the professional models with the huge sensors) what moving up tends to get you are things like more functions on buttons as opposed to on a menu, a weightier model, etc. A lot of them use the same sensors and image processors.

    This is the joy of interchangeable lens cameras - all the different lenses you can buy. You'll start off thinking you'll just get one or two and be happy with that; trust me, you won't. A lot of bags (that one included) are designed to carry the camera and multiple lenses ... and telephoto lenses aren't necessarily huge. The 55-250 isn't.

    I have two DSLRs: my main one is a 5DMII, which I bought to mainly do landscape photography; this has a 24-105 lens as the general purpose, plus a couple of wide angle lenses for the landscapes. I also have a 550D (the 600D without a rotating screen) and the 55-250 lens for the occasions I want to take photos at a longer focal length. I originally had the 550D with a collection of lenses for that (Tamron 17-50, Canon 60mm, Canon 10-22) but sold most of them when I got the 5DMII. Here a couple of my photos:

    Spoiler:
    Show


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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    The 600D comes with more megapixels than the 1100D, but 12 megapixels is more than enough (about 8 MP gives you a good A4 sized print) unless you plan to be cropping photos to a high degree. Beyond that, there are few differences.

    The 1100D belongs to the entry level range, whereas the 600D is in a higher range of entry level DSLRs ... but (at least until you get to the professional models with the huge sensors) what moving up tends to get you are things like more functions on buttons as opposed to on a menu, a weightier model, etc. A lot of them use the same sensors and image processors.

    This is the joy of interchangeable lens cameras - all the different lenses you can buy. You'll start off thinking you'll just get one or two and be happy with that; trust me, you won't. A lot of bags (that one included) are designed to carry the camera and multiple lenses ... and telephoto lenses aren't necessarily huge. The 55-250 isn't.

    I have two DSLRs: my main one is a 5DMII, which I bought to mainly do landscape photography; this has a 24-105 lens as the general purpose, plus a couple of wide angle lenses for the landscapes. I also have a 550D (the 600D without a rotating screen) and the 55-250 lens for the occasions I want to take photos at a longer focal length. I originally had the 550D with a collection of lenses for that (Tamron 17-50, Canon 60mm, Canon 10-22) but sold most of them when I got the 5DMII. Here a couple of my photos:

    Spoiler:
    Show


    Ah okay, so perhaps I've been a little misguided by the numbers! So with a 'more high end' camera, would it be harder to use for a beginner? For you, a large range of lens may be a great advantage...but for me, I don't really know the differences between the lens! Would it be a good choice for me to go for a camera with the standard 18-55mm lens? As I would have to choice to get that, or pay about £200 more for the 18-135mm. Or should I get the 18-55mm and wait till I've played around with the camera, before getting a telefocus lens? I wouldn't mind carrying 2 lens, or would you potentially miss out on 'opportunities' to take photos? Also, the telefocus goes to about 250mm compared to the 18-135mm, is that a major advantage of the telefocus, or does it not matter? I thought the telefocus would be absolutely huge...as it looks huge

    You have two cameras! :eek: I suppose it's not that surprising as they are used for different things...but still From the lens which you use, the 18-55mm seems a little redundant. Is it not used very often? I think my main dilemma like I previously mentioned is which lens to buy with the camera. I like your first photo, as your can clearly see the ripples in the water which are nice! (Yeah, I'm very easily pleased!) I probably would be a little too cautious about taking a photo like that in case I fell into the water or something
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    You will be disapointed if you buy the NEX.

    To suggest that CSC's are on a similar level to DSLR's is untrue. SLR's are still lightyears ahead of any other still camera type.

    The very fact they use liveview and an electronic viewfinder is detrimental to image capture.

    Lenses:

    Stay with the 18-55 and shoot with that. You will become aware of it's shortcomings as you try to use it to shoot what you are intrested in. It is a jack of all trades lens and in that respect, it's very good. It's also capable of producing some good images if the conditions are right, it is worked and the photog knows how to get the most from his equipment. Distortion and chrome ab are ever present and reasonably easily spotted by someone who knows what they are looking for.

    Once you know the shortcomings for whatever field of photog you want to move into, then buy the lens you want. Do not assume a big zoom makes a lens good.
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    (Original post by StaedtlerNoris)
    Ah okay, so perhaps I've been a little misguided by the numbers! So with a 'more high end' camera, would it be harder to use for a beginner? For you, a large range of lens may be a great advantage...but for me, I don't really know the differences between the lens! Would it be a good choice for me to go for a camera with the standard 18-55mm lens? As I would have to choice to get that, or pay about £200 more for the 18-135mm. Or should I get the 18-55mm and wait till I've played around with the camera, before getting a telefocus lens? I wouldn't mind carrying 2 lens, or would you potentially miss out on 'opportunities' to take photos? Also, the telefocus goes to about 250mm compared to the 18-135mm, is that a major advantage of the telefocus, or does it not matter? I thought the telefocus would be absolutely huge...as it looks huge

    You have two cameras! :eek: I suppose it's not that surprising as they are used for different things...but still From the lens which you use, the 18-55mm seems a little redundant. Is it not used very often? I think my main dilemma like I previously mentioned is which lens to buy with the camera. I like your first photo, as your can clearly see the ripples in the water which are nice! (Yeah, I'm very easily pleased!) I probably would be a little too cautious about taking a photo like that in case I fell into the water or something
    Well, lenses are a personal preference, and one of the great things with any ILC is that you can customise your lenses. I use the 18mm to 55mm range quite a lot, almost exclusively in fact, but I have other lenses that do this. But, without meaning to sound like a condescending **** (although I realise I probably do... ), I have been doing it long enough and have enough skills for better (more expensive) lenses to be worth it. I have a couple of very specific ones to do things that won't be something you worry about in the beginning.

    I started out with an 18-55mm, and added the 55-250mm lens afterwards. The point of starting out with a decent all-rounder is you explore the areas you want to move into and find out where your kit fails ... and then you can start to accumulate the lenses you want/'need' (I say 'need' because really, few people need this stuff: we just want it and justify it somehow. :p:)

    I'd say get the 18-55mm, and maybe add a 55-250mm as well. Don't start out by going extravagent, figure out where you want to spend first.
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    Well, lenses are a personal preference, and one of the great things with any ILC is that you can customise your lenses. I use the 18mm to 55mm range quite a lot, almost exclusively in fact, but I have other lenses that do this. But, without meaning to sound like a condescending **** (although I realise I probably do... ), I have been doing it long enough and have enough skills for better (more expensive) lenses to be worth it. I have a couple of very specific ones to do things that won't be something you worry about in the beginning.

    I started out with an 18-55mm, and added the 55-250mm lens afterwards. The point of starting out with a decent all-rounder is you explore the areas you want to move into and find out where your kit fails ... and then you can start to accumulate the lenses you want/'need' (I say 'need' because really, few people need this stuff: we just want it and justify it somehow. :p:)

    I'd say get the 18-55mm, and maybe add a 55-250mm as well. Don't start out by going extravagent, figure out where you want to spend first.
    Okay, so I think I should get a camera + 18-55mm lens + a bag to hold it all And maybe an additional battery. In late June, I'll be going on a trip to Europe with a few of my friends, as I want something relatively portable, is it worth getting a bag small enough to fit only one lens rather than the one you suggested? As I could buy a smaller bag that would fit one lens (and maybe a few accessories) rather than the lowepro one which is bulkier? Or is that not advisable? As I'd rather not carry a really noticeable bag which maybe targeted by theives

    Don't worry, you don't sound like a condescending ****! I really appreciate all of your help and I feel like I'm better equipped to buying a camera which suits my requirements.

    Also, I am planning to buy the camera through John Lewis (via their price match scheme if possible), which shops are generally the cheapest for buying cameras? I took a look at Currys which was reasonably priced, but I don't think John Lewis will price-match 'bundles' which they don't sell. But I'm not sure if I'm missing out on a highstreet store which sells cheap cameras!
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    Just to chip into this at the end after it would be any use; on a work trip recently (of 3 months) one of my colleagues had a NEX with a couple of lenses and I had my Canon dSLR, which is a few years old now and waaayyyyy outclassed by the modern ones.
    Photo quality is comparable, which means a 600D should be better, but you need to really get in close or blow the images up large to see the difference. The lack of viewfinder would be a deal-breaker for me, unless you chip in an extra £300 for the hot-shoe oLED one that some CSCs have. The NEX did have a burst mode that gave a stupidly high number of frames in a second and it is MUCH lighter and smaller.
    The main reason I'd go for a dSLR at that level is that, although the CSC has most of the same options and creative control, the settings are mostly hidden inside menus that require concentration to find while the SLR has pretty much everything set on assigned buttons. I can change ISO, exposure compensation, shutter speed, f-stop, all without really having to look and mostly without having to move my hands as the controls are generally all under my fingers.
    Of course the down side of all of these is that there is a huge amount of three letter acronyms.
    If you’re likely to look to using as much manual as possible and getting really creative with the settings I’d say go dSLR but the CSCs are pretty darn good!
 
 
 
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