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What do feel like?( for those in the Uk) Watch

  • View Poll Results: What do you feel you are? (you can choose more than one)
    British?
    84
    62.69%
    English?
    47
    35.07%
    Scottish?
    11
    8.21%
    Welsh?
    8
    5.97%
    Londoner?/ Glaswegianer? / other major city/town
    22
    16.42%
    Midlander? North Easter? South Londoner? Cornish?/Other major region
    16
    11.94%
    Northern Irish?
    5
    3.73%

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    (Original post by a729)
    Being a nationalist doesn't make you a BNP or EDL supporter!
    True but the two do seem to go hand in hand an annoyingly large amount of the time.
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    Humanist>British>English>Midland er.

    (Not sure what is happening with the kerning here, might just be me)
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    English/British. My mum was born in Scotland and I grew up there but I don't feel much connection to it, mostly cos I got teased rotten for being English so that's probably why. When I was younger I identified as Cornish but we stopped going on holiday there regularly when I was about 12 so I don't really know it so well now. Bit of a drifter really. Like my mum, she moved around a lot as a kid so she doesn't really have anywhere she identifies as "home". My dad was born in Somerset but he doesn't seem overly attached to it. We're very detached people, clearly. :lol:
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    British, then English.
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    I'm English at least as far back as my great grandparents and I've lived in England my whole life, so I identify myself as English.
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    Northern Irish then British
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    Human.
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    (Original post by cl_steele)
    True but the two do seem to go hand in hand an annoyingly large amount of the time.
    Just like socialism/communism leads to lower civic rights and less personal freedoms-as history had shown us!
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    WTHeck? Why not 'other country'?

    I feel Londoner>Colombian>Spanish... but I feel part of all three none the less!!!!

    :banana2::banana::banana2:
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    I always identify as British on forms, so I'd probably say British > English > Northerner
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    I identify as a human being

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    English, British and a Southerner (as in South England). Also European, but that's not an option for some reason.

    (Original post by sabian92)
    English. Not British/European/anything else.

    I always write English on forms that ask for nationality and it pisses people right off :awesome:
    That's probably because it's not the correct answer. If it's asking for your legal nationality, "English" is an invalid answer.
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    I asked a question in yahoo answers if these three countries would like to have independence (Ireland doesn't have complete independence) a lot in Ireland said yes, some said yes in Scotland, not much said yes in Wales (partly because they are small) but this debate isn't going to be about independence. When I asked that question I've learned a lot (and was a little shocked) that people in these countries consider themselves British. And half said they are British the other half said they aren't British. They said British is the same as English. Well just because Americans speak in english they are no way considered British. A lot in Wales considered themselves Welsh but would rather be considered British. I have never seen a country that would promote no pride for there country. Can you guys from the U.K. explain this and specifically from these countries. And for the people that don't consider themselves British is it frustrating to hear your fellow native neighbors say that they are British. I mean if your going to call yourself British why won't your country just be called Great Britain too. I think the U.K. system is a little complicated and has confused some of you guys.
    Vietnam tours-Vietnam trip-Halong Valentine cruise
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    British, then English, then a Londoner.
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    (Original post by manroger4)
    I asked a question in yahoo answers if these three countries would like to have independence (Ireland doesn't have complete independence) a lot in Ireland said yes, some said yes in Scotland, not much said yes in Wales (partly because they are small) but this debate isn't going to be about independence. When I asked that question I've learned a lot (and was a little shocked) that people in these countries consider themselves British. And half said they are British the other half said they aren't British. They said British is the same as English. Well just because Americans speak in english they are no way considered British. A lot in Wales considered themselves Welsh but would rather be considered British. I have never seen a country that would promote no pride for there country. Can you guys from the U.K. explain this and specifically from these countries. And for the people that don't consider themselves British is it frustrating to hear your fellow native neighbors say that they are British. I mean if your going to call yourself British why won't your country just be called Great Britain too. I think the U.K. system is a little complicated and has confused some of you guys.
    I'm not sure if yahoo answers is very reliable. I'm Welsh and consider myself Welsh and British. The Welsh people are a very proud people so I'm not sure where the no pride thing came from. Among some there is the misconception that British means English so they refuse to be called British but they're completely wrong. The majority of the people I know are Welsh over British but personally I think that's a bit silly. In the US, you can consider yourself Texan and American, it's a bit like that.


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    English, simply because of strong Yorkshire roots.

    Don't get me wrong, I have lived in Wales for about 10 years now, and I just hate how patriotic the Welsh are! It's almost like they are insecure about their dying culture. They feel the need to force Welsh culture upon everybody that enters the country. Welsh is compulsory in schools, and it is also stated in the curriculum that lessons should involve some sort of Welsh culture.

    Frankly, I find it all a bit unfair that Wales is not very open minded about other cultures. I mean, you don't come to England and be told the you HAVE to act like an Englishman, do you? The majority of England's population aren't English anyways, but the respect still stands.

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    (Original post by Psyk)
    That's probably because it's not the correct answer. If it's asking for your legal nationality, "English" is an invalid answer.
    I know and even though my passport/driving licence are British I don't identify myself as such. As far as I'm concerned I was born in England, I live in England, I speak English (not a UK minority language like Cornish/Gaelic/Welsh) and I have an English accent. I'm about as British as I come even via my heritage to at least the 15th Century (I found some Eastern European Jews in my family line) but by and large I'm English.

    I may as well identify myself as Irish if I say i'm British.
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    (Original post by manroger4)
    I asked a question in yahoo answers if these three countries would like to have independence (Ireland doesn't have complete independence) a lot in Ireland said yes, some said yes in Scotland, not much said yes in Wales (partly because they are small) but this debate isn't going to be about independence. When I asked that question I've learned a lot (and was a little shocked) that people in these countries consider themselves British. And half said they are British the other half said they aren't British. They said British is the same as English. Well just because Americans speak in english they are no way considered British. A lot in Wales considered themselves Welsh but would rather be considered British. I have never seen a country that would promote no pride for there country. Can you guys from the U.K. explain this and specifically from these countries. And for the people that don't consider themselves British is it frustrating to hear your fellow native neighbors say that they are British. I mean if your going to call yourself British why won't your country just be called Great Britain too. I think the U.K. system is a little complicated and has confused some of you guys.
    Can you post a link to that question please?
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    First and foremost, I am ENGLISH. Although my granddad and ancestors are from Scotland, Ireland and Wales. Being British comes second. Being a Londoner isn't crucial to my identity because plenty of people move here and call themselves as such.
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    what if ur niether of them?
 
 
 
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