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    The question is How does Steinbeck present ideas about leaders and power in the text as a whole?

    and my answer so far is...please let me know how many marks i could gewt on this out of 30 thank you
    Steinbeck uses various characters to convey ideas about leaders and power. In the beginning we see that the relationship between George and Lennie connotes ideas of the leader and the follower. In the beginning of this novella Steinbeck writes ‘George lay back on the sand and crossed his hands under his head, and Lennie imitated him, raising his head to see whether he were doing it right’ Although Lennie may have an intellectual disability he follows George and throughout their relationship we see that George is the ultimate leader in the eyes of Lennie, wherever they go George leads, this quote suggests that Lennie wants to be just like him, he enjoys his company and Georges qualities as a person seem to reflect on Lennie’s behaviour. We can see that when George scolds or commands, Lennie responds as though George has a certain control over him we can see this when George asks for Lennie to hand over the mouse we see that the writer has stated ‘George snapped his fingers sharply, and at the sound Lennie laid the mouse in his hand’. This suggests that George has power over Lennie he is more intelligent and knows how to get his attention by snapping his fingers we see that Steinbeck is portraying George as Lennie’s master and the fact that when he did snap his fingers Lennie responded very quickly implicates that George has certain qualities that make him overpower Lennie.

    Another character that presents leadership and power itself is Slim, when he is introduced in the book we see that Steinbeck specifically writes ‘He was a jerkline skinner, the prince of the ranch’ Steinbeck describes him as a living legend and Slim lives in the shadow of his overwhelming description we see that he is important and respected by the others on the ranch he is the leader and has power over others on the ranch. Steinbeck describes him with such majestic words that connote that this character is in fact very special and has god like qualities that make him a better leader than George. He is very well known and becomes a good companion to George as the story builds up. He has authority over other men in the ranch and we see that because he’s got a very genuine caring personality this makes him a great leader. Through the character of Slim we see that Steinbeck portrays a figure of inspiration that many of the cowboys look up to, he represents an outstanding leader who is able to empower the audience with his unique and congenial virtues.

    We see that there is an authority in the ranch that separates the workers from the owners of the ranch this gap in society indicates that power is a much stronger force when it is used with ignorance and taken advantage of. As the readers we begin to see how the boss and the boss’s son are at the top of the hierarchy and therefore have a higher position in authority which implicates that they have ultimate power over every single worker on the ranch. When Curley the boss’s son is introduced in the story Steinbeck writes ‘like the boss he wore high heeled boots’ we can tell that just by the way he dresses he doesn’t work on the ranch therefore suggesting that if he dresses like the boss and is the boss’s son then he has a certain advantage and power over the other ranch workers. He seems to seize the opportunity to intimidate when he lays his eyes on Lennie and George for the first time. As Curley approaches Lennie, Steinbeck describes his movement as being ‘calculating and pugnacious’ this aggressive behaviour makes Lennie feel quite nervous this suggests that Curley is strong and his aggressive personality shows the reader that Curley is completely aware that he is above them not only on the ranch but in society he uses this to his advantage. His threatening behaviour also indicates a form of foreshadowing which shows that Steinbeck has played on the idea of how power when in the wrong hands could mean that danger is lurking ahead. We later on see that Curley is waiting to get provoked and when he does he will instantly lash out. 'Curley stepped over to Lennie like a terrier’ we can see that as the novella progresses Curley’s character becomes more and more aggressive, he’s described by Steinbeck as a violent character and because he has an authority over the ranch worker s as readers we establish that he has supremacy over these workers and because of this he doesn’t have anyone to look up to or as he is at the top of the hierarchy, he knows he’s in charge and that’s what makes it easier for him to be aggressive and dangerous towards others because he knows nobody will stop him. The writer portrays Curley as the pinnacle of power and how different power can be when you’re at the top of the hierarchy.

    To conclude Steinbeck uses various techniques in order to represent power and leaders, he uses the characters as his main source for ideas through the characters personality and emotions we are able to conjure up ideas about how society was built upon leaders and power this meant that people were discriminated and violence and murder was the pinnacle of problems during the time of this novella. We see that some people like Curley used their power to threaten and build fear in others hearts however some people like Slim were respected and treated like royalty because of his gentle qualities and inviting confidence. We see that both of these kind of people were very different and held completely different reputations in society and one represented power whilst the other represented a good leader that was good to his fellow ranch workers.
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    OK, looking at the exam mark scheme and experience doing some marking and tell you this wasn't brilliant.
    Assessment Objective 1 : Interpretation, response & themes
    AO2: analysis of detail and linguistic methods
    A04: relation to context
    Roughly speaking, Each objective and 'semi-skill' is given a level (1-6)
    http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...W-MS-JUN12.PDF (PG26)
    There some good exploration of ideas, though at times very verbose and repetitive. There some good comment on differentiation of power and leader though in the conclusion. Level 5
    Throughout the piece, there wasn't much quotes to support your (lengthy) explanation. When you did quote you were fleeting with them and didn't break down the language as was demanded in A02. Limited comment on linguistic methods or structure. (Level 4 for quotes, L2 for language & structure)
    Some reference to context, though needs more detail and clarity. L2
    Overall, you're top of L3, 15 marks, out of 30 in the exam.
    This is a mid-B in exams(UMS CONVERTER)
    This is a Highish D for controlled assessments.
    Hope this helps.

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    To be totally honest with you this piece of work is amazing as I am not capable of writing so much with such quality, I would give your piece of work a 30 out of 30, it is FANTASTIC! What mark did you get anyway in reality?
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    This might scrape a low B, probably a C though, so I would give it around 20. It has quotations and some (limited) analysis, but the majority of your essay is just telling the story, not answering the question. It is also very limited in the breadth of points being made. Still, a good foundation to work on
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    I'd disagree with the 30/30. I'd give this about 18/30. So a B/C.

    You haven't got enough analysis and explanation. You need to go in depth. For a controlled assessment, you should be writing 2000 words. For exam practise, you should be writing about 1200 words. I'll show you my controlled assessment draft that was given 24/30. This an A grade response. I obviously can't give you an edited draft, that got 28. It's a different topic but just read through and try and see what I've done.

    How does Steinbeck present conflict in the form of loneliness in the novella Of Mice and Men?
    In Of Mice and Men, Steinbeck pairs the themes of loneliness and friendship, portraying friendship as a way of escaping the desolate life that many characters live. George and Lennie illustrate this as neither of the pair encounter that much loneliness in the novella. Furthermore they “look after each other” as George states in the novelette. However, in Of Mice and Men, no one is really alone because all the characters work and live close together yet they experience several accounts of loneliness. Loneliness is clearly pointed out in the novella as a main theme, and one that is accounted by most people in the novella, worker or not, because George states that ranch workers “are the loneliest guys in the world.” Loneliness is emphasised throughout the book: most characters are lonely and have no friends, compared with George and Lennie, who are the only friendship illustrated in this book. George clearly states the full extent of ranch workers’ loneliness but also states that George and Lennie “ain’t like that.” Throughout the novella, Steinbeck gives us a picture of most ranch workers as rootless souls with no family or friends, but the three loneliest characters are those who live permanently on the ranch.
    During the 30s, the time in which Of Mice and Men is set, many men were forced to become itinerant workers, leaving families behind. These men would travel the United States alone, many in the southern states like California, where land had not been over-farmed like more central states like Texas and Oklahoma. Steinbeck emphasises loneliness throughout the novella, in various ways and in various characters. One way is through setting. The ranch George and Lennie go to at the start of the novella is “a few miles south of Soledad”; Sole means alone so the fact that the ranch is near Soledad signifies that it is a lonely place. Further, Steinbeck metaphorically shows how lonely the place is throughout the opening chapter through small events. The ideal opening scene, a vibrant warm green landscape, has no human life additionally implying loneliness, also foreshadowing how loneliness comes into place as a main theme in Of Mice and Men.
    Loneliness is further accentuated during the scenes including the Bunkhouse. The verb “littered” in the bunkhouse signifies the lack of care ranch workers have, towards belongings and even to the extent of other people, inferring their loneliness. We can interpret that since Candy comes alone to meet George and Lennie when they arrive at the ranch, that most ranch-workers live isolated lives. When the ranch-workers decide to play a game, they choose to play solitaire, a one-player game, further stressing how desolate the itinerant workers live are.
    Steinbeck uses descriptive passages to start and end the novella. The opening chapter (Part One) contains description of an idyllic paradisiac landscape. Significantly, the opening few pages are the only few in the whole novella that are in present tense, suggesting its isolation as a place out of time. This is a literary technique used to suggest isolation in the fact that the dream can never become a reality.
    Candy is old and has lost his hand in a farming accident. As such, he is unable to experience the camaraderie of shared work. Because of this, he has become the cleaner of the living quarters. This is probably what makes him one of the three loneliest characters in the book. His only friendship lies with his dog, which was killed by Carlson, which further emphasises that ranch workers are meant to live alone, in a secluded solitary life. He also has no family he feels he can live with in his old age, which further deepens his disappointment when he realises the dream can never come true. Candy’s loneliness is shown additionally when he has no retirement plan in place. Like Candy, Candy’s dog is old and also Candy’s dog is hand to complaints by the other ranch-workers for stinking out the bunkhouse. His lack of power and authority is the reason he is unable to stop his only friend from being killed. Candy realises he is old and infirm and as soon as he is unable to work he will be gone, and the kindness shown by the Boss will end. This is shown when he admits that, “They’ll can me purty soon. Jus’ as soon as I can’t swamp out no bunk houses.”
    Candy also displays a lack of sympathy towards Curley’s wife during the novella. Steinbeck illustrates Curley’s wife as something that Candy is jealous of in a way like she has everything whereas he has nothing. He wants a family and a position of authority like Curley’s wife and this creates conflict because Candy feels as though Curley’s wife does not realise the things she has: she is young and good-looking. Candy is unsympathetic towards her when she searches for Curley, secretly feeling that she has nothing to be searching for and that she has everything she could possibly want already. This conflict between the pair is further deepened when because of her death, his retirement plan and dream cannot become a reality as planned. He also thinks that she is ‘a tart’ which is the main cultural view of women who look at another man. The sexual double standards of America in the 1930s were punitive; it was seen as okay for a man to enter a brothel but as soon as a woman looks with any interest at another man, she is considered ‘a tart’.
    Crooks is also shown as a very lonely character. He has a private bunk, because he is black, which further separates him from making friends and talking with people, making him more solitary. He is not allowed to mix with the other workers, and when he was allowed to at Christmas, he was attacked by another worker. Here is an obvious cause of conflict. There are no black families for miles in Soledad, and Crooks is the only black person on the ranch, which is ethnic-centric of white people. In California, at the time, the racial hatred of his kind was not as severe as the South, where he is proud not to come from (as this signifies he has no recent family history of slavery) but he is still treated badly as Curley’s wife threatens him, stating “I could get you strung up on a tree so easy.” His voice was described as “toneless” following the incident; he has a lack of identity: he has “no personality, no ego – nothing to arouse either like or dislike.”
    Crooks also states that “a guy goes nuts if he ain’t got nobody”, also contradicting the fact that George and Lennie are the only relationship in the novella and Lennie being described as “nuts” , possibly meaning that Lennie is lonely in the fact that George acts more like a father to him than a friend. Crooks also seems jealous of the friendship between George and Lennie when Lennie enters his bunk. Crooks confides with Lennie, in a conversation in which Crook’s main themes is his discontent and loneliness as the only black man on a segregated ranch and how he experienced friendship as a child but how this soon changed once he became older. “I went to play with them, and some of them was pretty nice. My ol’ man didn’t like that. I never knew till long later why.”
    Steinbeck introduces Curley’s wife in a way which reflects the fact that she is the only woman on the ranch, which further shows how isolated she is. She is described, rather than a woman, as “a girl”, which could mean that she is young or merely that Steinbeck, like other men at the time, sees women in this way. Curley’s wife clearly states that “Why can't i talk to you? I never get to talk to nobody I get awful lonely" which shows how lonely she is. She also states what she could do to Crooks by threatening him, but I feel like this is a cry for respect, rather than that of racism. Curley’s wife wants some authority, reverence and for people to listen to and hear her.
    Curley’s wife is first introduced as a catalyst for trouble, but however after getting to know the character, you realise she is just a young woman with shattered dreams and a failing marriage. Ironically at no point during the novella, apart from when she is dead, Curley’s wife is never with Curley; they’re always apart and they’re always trying to find each other, presenting their isolation. Curley’s wife is significantly the only woman on the ranch, presenting further seclusion.
    In conclusion, Steinbeck uses an array of language to show loneliness in this novella to represent the harsh secluded solitary life that ranch workers lived at the time in which Of Mice and Men is set. Throughout the novella, George and Lennie’s relationship is highlighted as odd, unfamiliar and unusual and this is the only friendship portrayed in the novella. Neither the Boss; Curley nor Slim have friends shown in the book, or a friendship that substantial as the one shared between George and Lennie, probably due to Steinbeck not wanting to clutter the novelette with minor characters or to further represent the seclusion of most men during the 1930s. Times were hard, with economic depression and starvation conquering most of the world. As George clearly points out, “Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world,” illustrating the harsh and cruel life of 1930s America.
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    Im doing passage to india and I want to get an A in As and I was wondering if anyone has A grade essay in analysis literature ??? Thanks And i Will be very grateful


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    20/30
    it was qjite good but you made some spelling and paragraphs
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    (Original post by iWillWalker23)
    I'd disagree with the 30/30. I'd give this about 18/30. So a B/C.

    You haven't got enough analysis and explanation. You need to go in depth. For a controlled assessment, you should be writing 2000 words. For exam practise, you should be writing about 1200 words. I'll show you my controlled assessment draft that was given 24/30. This an A grade response. I obviously can't give you an edited draft, that got 28. It's a different topic but just read through and try and see what I've done.

    How does Steinbeck present conflict in the form of loneliness in the novella Of Mice and Men?
    In Of Mice and Men, Steinbeck pairs the themes of loneliness and friendship, portraying friendship as a way of escaping the desolate life that many characters live. George and Lennie illustrate this as neither of the pair encounter that much loneliness in the novella. Furthermore they “look after each other” as George states in the novelette. However, in Of Mice and Men, no one is really alone because all the characters work and live close together yet they experience several accounts of loneliness. Loneliness is clearly pointed out in the novella as a main theme, and one that is accounted by most people in the novella, worker or not, because George states that ranch workers “are the loneliest guys in the world.” Loneliness is emphasised throughout the book: most characters are lonely and have no friends, compared with George and Lennie, who are the only friendship illustrated in this book. George clearly states the full extent of ranch workers’ loneliness but also states that George and Lennie “ain’t like that.” Throughout the novella, Steinbeck gives us a picture of most ranch workers as rootless souls with no family or friends, but the three loneliest characters are those who live permanently on the ranch.
    During the 30s, the time in which Of Mice and Men is set, many men were forced to become itinerant workers, leaving families behind. These men would travel the United States alone, many in the southern states like California, where land had not been over-farmed like more central states like Texas and Oklahoma. Steinbeck emphasises loneliness throughout the novella, in various ways and in various characters. One way is through setting. The ranch George and Lennie go to at the start of the novella is “a few miles south of Soledad”; Sole means alone so the fact that the ranch is near Soledad signifies that it is a lonely place. Further, Steinbeck metaphorically shows how lonely the place is throughout the opening chapter through small events. The ideal opening scene, a vibrant warm green landscape, has no human life additionally implying loneliness, also foreshadowing how loneliness comes into place as a main theme in Of Mice and Men.
    Loneliness is further accentuated during the scenes including the Bunkhouse. The verb “littered” in the bunkhouse signifies the lack of care ranch workers have, towards belongings and even to the extent of other people, inferring their loneliness. We can interpret that since Candy comes alone to meet George and Lennie when they arrive at the ranch, that most ranch-workers live isolated lives. When the ranch-workers decide to play a game, they choose to play solitaire, a one-player game, further stressing how desolate the itinerant workers live are.
    Steinbeck uses descriptive passages to start and end the novella. The opening chapter (Part One) contains description of an idyllic paradisiac landscape. Significantly, the opening few pages are the only few in the whole novella that are in present tense, suggesting its isolation as a place out of time. This is a literary technique used to suggest isolation in the fact that the dream can never become a reality.
    Candy is old and has lost his hand in a farming accident. As such, he is unable to experience the camaraderie of shared work. Because of this, he has become the cleaner of the living quarters. This is probably what makes him one of the three loneliest characters in the book. His only friendship lies with his dog, which was killed by Carlson, which further emphasises that ranch workers are meant to live alone, in a secluded solitary life. He also has no family he feels he can live with in his old age, which further deepens his disappointment when he realises the dream can never come true. Candy’s loneliness is shown additionally when he has no retirement plan in place. Like Candy, Candy’s dog is old and also Candy’s dog is hand to complaints by the other ranch-workers for stinking out the bunkhouse. His lack of power and authority is the reason he is unable to stop his only friend from being killed. Candy realises he is old and infirm and as soon as he is unable to work he will be gone, and the kindness shown by the Boss will end. This is shown when he admits that, “They’ll can me purty soon. Jus’ as soon as I can’t swamp out no bunk houses.”
    Candy also displays a lack of sympathy towards Curley’s wife during the novella. Steinbeck illustrates Curley’s wife as something that Candy is jealous of in a way like she has everything whereas he has nothing. He wants a family and a position of authority like Curley’s wife and this creates conflict because Candy feels as though Curley’s wife does not realise the things she has: she is young and good-looking. Candy is unsympathetic towards her when she searches for Curley, secretly feeling that she has nothing to be searching for and that she has everything she could possibly want already. This conflict between the pair is further deepened when because of her death, his retirement plan and dream cannot become a reality as planned. He also thinks that she is ‘a tart’ which is the main cultural view of women who look at another man. The sexual double standards of America in the 1930s were punitive; it was seen as okay for a man to enter a brothel but as soon as a woman looks with any interest at another man, she is considered ‘a tart’.
    Crooks is also shown as a very lonely character. He has a private bunk, because he is black, which further separates him from making friends and talking with people, making him more solitary. He is not allowed to mix with the other workers, and when he was allowed to at Christmas, he was attacked by another worker. Here is an obvious cause of conflict. There are no black families for miles in Soledad, and Crooks is the only black person on the ranch, which is ethnic-centric of white people. In California, at the time, the racial hatred of his kind was not as severe as the South, where he is proud not to come from (as this signifies he has no recent family history of slavery) but he is still treated badly as Curley’s wife threatens him, stating “I could get you strung up on a tree so easy.” His voice was described as “toneless” following the incident; he has a lack of identity: he has “no personality, no ego – nothing to arouse either like or dislike.”
    Crooks also states that “a guy goes nuts if he ain’t got nobody”, also contradicting the fact that George and Lennie are the only relationship in the novella and Lennie being described as “nuts” , possibly meaning that Lennie is lonely in the fact that George acts more like a father to him than a friend. Crooks also seems jealous of the friendship between George and Lennie when Lennie enters his bunk. Crooks confides with Lennie, in a conversation in which Crook’s main themes is his discontent and loneliness as the only black man on a segregated ranch and how he experienced friendship as a child but how this soon changed once he became older. “I went to play with them, and some of them was pretty nice. My ol’ man didn’t like that. I never knew till long later why.”
    Steinbeck introduces Curley’s wife in a way which reflects the fact that she is the only woman on the ranch, which further shows how isolated she is. She is described, rather than a woman, as “a girl”, which could mean that she is young or merely that Steinbeck, like other men at the time, sees women in this way. Curley’s wife clearly states that “Why can't i talk to you? I never get to talk to nobody I get awful lonely" which shows how lonely she is. She also states what she could do to Crooks by threatening him, but I feel like this is a cry for respect, rather than that of racism. Curley’s wife wants some authority, reverence and for people to listen to and hear her.
    Curley’s wife is first introduced as a catalyst for trouble, but however after getting to know the character, you realise she is just a young woman with shattered dreams and a failing marriage. Ironically at no point during the novella, apart from when she is dead, Curley’s wife is never with Curley; they’re always apart and they’re always trying to find each other, presenting their isolation. Curley’s wife is significantly the only woman on the ranch, presenting further seclusion.
    In conclusion, Steinbeck uses an array of language to show loneliness in this novella to represent the harsh secluded solitary life that ranch workers lived at the time in which Of Mice and Men is set. Throughout the novella, George and Lennie’s relationship is highlighted as odd, unfamiliar and unusual and this is the only friendship portrayed in the novella. Neither the Boss; Curley nor Slim have friends shown in the book, or a friendship that substantial as the one shared between George and Lennie, probably due to Steinbeck not wanting to clutter the novelette with minor characters or to further represent the seclusion of most men during the 1930s. Times were hard, with economic depression and starvation conquering most of the world. As George clearly points out, “Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world,” illustrating the harsh and cruel life of 1930s America.


    hey could you please mark mine , its part b of mice and men
    how do you think Steinbeck uses the character of lennie in the novel as a whole to convey important ideas about society at the time


    Steinbeck uses all of his character in the novel to symbolise or represent ion a certain part of society in 1930s of america , it is his represent ion of what america was like in that era. although one charter that stands out from the rat is Lennie who plays a main role in the story and highlights most of the journey , however the overall representation of Lennie was that he was a big man , ironically a contrast to his actual name which was a ‘Lennie small’ which therefore indicates the contrast in his personality and charter , this was because Lennie didn't condone a mind a of his own therefore this implies that he was mostly dependant on George, the man the he travels ( follows) with. This is manly because Lennie has been presented as someone who has limited intelligence , so he relies on George to look after him in general. However Steinbeck has ensure that the reader notices the representation of Lennie in a more of a detailed and complex way , Steinbeck has done this to create an image for the reader and comprehend to what Lennie is like ,this is demonstrated as Steinbeck writes “ behind him walked his opposite , a huge man, shapeless of face, with large , plea eyes with wide , slopping shoulders and he walked heavily dragging his feet a little , the way a bear drags his paws , his arms did not swing ay his side but hung loosely “ this can be interoperated in many different ways with many different meaning however , the main theme is that Lennie has been described as an animal which links to the appearance and body language of an animal , in particular , a bear. “ the way a bear drags his paws” , Lennie has been given the description of having paws a few times , this indicates his relative size emphasised compared to another however this also suggest an aggressive and dangerous animal which people may what to stay clear of , in addition this could alternatively be a method that Steinbeck has use that could be a method of foreshadowing , suggesting that he may be aggressive later on the story ( which we know has been demonstrated due to the death of Cruelys wife. This automatically gets rid of his actual identity and labels him , which can be seen that he lacks the common human qualities but also referring to his size and appearance , that it is unusual from and average human , however in addition this can leo be seen as the fact that “ walked his opposite “ this is referring to George’s opposite , this is could mean that they are two very contrasting charters however traveling together which is hard enough but the fact that not many migrant workers did travel together due to the lack of care and responsibleness of another , however int he time of this era , migrant works was because of the droughts in the southern mid -western states like Kansas ,which led to failed harvest and dried up land therefore not being able to provide men with work therefore no income . And this led to many economic migrants headed to the west to “ golden “ California , thinking there would be land going spare however this wasn't the case and many people were rejected and has to build this homes in huge camps in California valleys , however the main highlight of the story for George and Lennie was hat they shared a dream , together . However many people in that era chased after a dream but soon noticed that no one succeeds in achieving this ‘american dream’ of owning your own land , and house and living in peace with your own stock supply , not having to work of life a finger.But Their dream was typically similar however had a little twist of owning a pice of land , and Lennie’s job would to tend the rabbits this was ironically strange due to the fact that his size and engender suggest that he’s quite strong headed, and manly but showed a complete opposite side - again referring back suggesting Georges Opposite. In conclusion this can be seen that they hold the typical image of migrant workers and ranch hands of owning a job and eating money however , very different to what normally happens.
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    hey can someone mark mine - part B so only 15marks .... please and thank you

    how do you think Steinbeck uses the character of lennie in the novel as a whole to convey important ideas about society at the time



    Steinbeck uses all of his character in the novel to symbolise or represent ion a certain part of society in 1930s of america , it is his represent ion of what america was like in that era. although one charter that stands out from the rat is Lennie who plays a main role in the story and highlights most of the journey , however the overall representation of Lennie was that he was a big man , ironically a contrast to his actual name which was a ‘Lennie small’ which therefore indicates the contrast in his personality and charter , this was because Lennie didn't condone a mind a of his own therefore this implies that he was mostly dependant on George, the man the he travels ( follows) with. This is manly because Lennie has been presented as someone who has limited intelligence , so he relies on George to look after him in general. However Steinbeck has ensure that the reader notices the representation of Lennie in a more of a detailed and complex way , Steinbeck has done this to create an image for the reader and comprehend to what Lennie is like ,this is demonstrated as Steinbeck writes “ behind him walked his opposite , a huge man, shapeless of face, with large , plea eyes with wide , slopping shoulders and he walked heavily dragging his feet a little , the way a bear drags his paws , his arms did not swing ay his side but hung loosely “ this can be interoperated in many different ways with many different meaning however , the main theme is that Lennie has been described as an animal which links to the appearance and body language of an animal , in particular , a bear. “ the way a bear drags his paws” , Lennie has been given the description of having paws a few times , this indicates his relative size emphasised compared to another however this also suggest an aggressive and dangerous animal which people may what to stay clear of , in addition this could alternatively be a method that Steinbeck has use that could be a method of foreshadowing , suggesting that he may be aggressive later on the story ( which we know has been demonstrated due to the death of Cruelys wife. This automatically gets rid of his actual identity and labels him , which can be seen that he lacks the common human qualities but also referring to his size and appearance , that it is unusual from and average human , however in addition this can leo be seen as the fact that “ walked his opposite “ this is referring to George’s opposite , this is could mean that they are two very contrasting charters however traveling together which is hard enough but the fact that not many migrant workers did travel together due to the lack of care and responsibleness of another , however int he time of this era , migrant works was because of the droughts in the southern mid -western states like Kansas ,which led to failed harvest and dried up land therefore not being able to provide men with work therefore no income . And this led to many economic migrants headed to the west to “ golden “ California , thinking there would be land going spare however this wasn't the case and many people were rejected and has to build this homes in huge camps in California valleys , however the main highlight of the story for George and Lennie was hat they shared a dream , together . However many people in that era chased after a dream but soon noticed that no one succeeds in achieving this ‘american dream’ of owning your own land , and house and living in peace with your own stock supply , not having to work of life a finger.But Their dream was typically similar however had a little twist of owning a pice of land , and Lennie’s job would to tend the rabbits this was ironically strange due to the fact that his size and engender suggest that he’s quite strong headed, and manly but showed a complete opposite side - again referring back suggesting Georges Opposite. In conclusion this can be seen that they hold the typical image of migrant workers and ranch hands of owning a job and eating money however , very different to what normally happens.
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    (Original post by zennadesigns)

    hey can someone mark mine - part B so only 15marks .... please and thank you

    how do you think Steinbeck uses the character of lennie in the novel as a whole to convey important ideas about society at the time



    Steinbeck uses all of his character in the novel to symbolise or represent ion a certain part of society in 1930s of america , it is his represent ion of what america was like in that era. although one charter that stands out from the rat is Lennie who plays a main role in the story and highlights most of the journey , however the overall representation of Lennie was that he was a big man , ironically a contrast to his actual name which was a ‘Lennie small’ which therefore indicates the contrast in his personality and charter , this was because Lennie didn't condone a mind a of his own therefore this implies that he was mostly dependant on George, the man the he travels ( follows) with. This is manly because Lennie has been presented as someone who has limited intelligence , so he relies on George to look after him in general. However Steinbeck has ensure that the reader notices the representation of Lennie in a more of a detailed and complex way , Steinbeck has done this to create an image for the reader and comprehend to what Lennie is like ,this is demonstrated as Steinbeck writes “ behind him walked his opposite , a huge man, shapeless of face, with large , plea eyes with wide , slopping shoulders and he walked heavily dragging his feet a little , the way a bear drags his paws , his arms did not swing ay his side but hung loosely “ this can be interoperated in many different ways with many different meaning however , the main theme is that Lennie has been described as an animal which links to the appearance and body language of an animal , in particular , a bear. “ the way a bear drags his paws” , Lennie has been given the description of having paws a few times , this indicates his relative size emphasised compared to another however this also suggest an aggressive and dangerous animal which people may what to stay clear of , in addition this could alternatively be a method that Steinbeck has use that could be a method of foreshadowing , suggesting that he may be aggressive later on the story ( which we know has been demonstrated due to the death of Cruelys wife. This automatically gets rid of his actual identity and labels him , which can be seen that he lacks the common human qualities but also referring to his size and appearance , that it is unusual from and average human , however in addition this can leo be seen as the fact that “ walked his opposite “ this is referring to George’s opposite , this is could mean that they are two very contrasting charters however traveling together which is hard enough but the fact that not many migrant workers did travel together due to the lack of care and responsibleness of another , however int he time of this era , migrant works was because of the droughts in the southern mid -western states like Kansas ,which led to failed harvest and dried up land therefore not being able to provide men with work therefore no income . And this led to many economic migrants headed to the west to “ golden “ California , thinking there would be land going spare however this wasn't the case and many people were rejected and has to build this homes in huge camps in California valleys , however the main highlight of the story for George and Lennie was hat they shared a dream , together . However many people in that era chased after a dream but soon noticed that no one succeeds in achieving this ‘american dream’ of owning your own land , and house and living in peace with your own stock supply , not having to work of life a finger.But Their dream was typically similar however had a little twist of owning a pice of land , and Lennie’s job would to tend the rabbits this was ironically strange due to the fact that his size and engender suggest that he’s quite strong headed, and manly but showed a complete opposite side - again referring back suggesting Georges Opposite. In conclusion this can be seen that they hold the typical image of migrant workers and ranch hands of owning a job and eating money however , very different to what normally happens.
    - remember quotes should be really short & you should analyse a single word
    - use more quotes - but also spend a good deal of time on one + analyse it greatly
    - having a more compelling conclusion

    A grade B I would say
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    sorry but for me it would be a grade u
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    Hey, my teacher won't mark my draft because he has no time to so could you guys just tell me what grade and mark you think I'm on please?
    Thanks!
    Explore how Steinbeck manipulates our response to Curleys Wife.
    Of Mice and Men was set during the 1930s in America and is set on a ranch similar to the one that Steinbeck himself worked on. The men of the ranch were chasing the american dream of success and living off the fat of the land, but the role of the Great Depression during this period made the achievement of this even harder. Steinbeck explores the contrasting lives of women as successful in the city and subservient in the house in how women were discriminated against. Curleys wife, the main female character in Of Mice and Men, feels violated and lonely as she is being flirtatious towards them. Steinbecks title immediately hints at the marginalisation of female characters in the novella, with an immediate emphasis on the role of ‘men’. ‘Men’ refers to the population as a whole and women at the time were ‘mice’ compared to ‘men’.

    Curleys wife. the main character and only female on the ranch in John Steinbeck's novella, “Of Mice and Men”. She is introduced at the beginning and in the end of the novella, her lack of judgment and flirtatiousness leads to her inevitable death at the hand of Lennie, confused and scared.

    She is first introduced by Candy, the swamper, who describes her from his perspective to George and Lennie. The fact that Curleys Wife is introduced through rumours means that the reader already has biased opinions of Curleys Wife before she even enters the section. Candy mentions that she's, “got the eye” implying that she is flirtatious and evil in the hint with the fact that she flirts with other men immediately after she is stated that she is married to Curley. Already, the reader is introduced to the thought that Curleys wife is an immoral “tart” which is expanded upon her first experience, which follows shortly after.

    Curleys wife is first seen in the doorway of the bunkhouse, asking about where his husband is, which is soon revealed as a weak excuse to communicate to the ranchers. She is said to be wearing a “red cotton house dress” and a pair of mules decorated with “bouquets of red ostrich feathers” emphasising her sexual presence as the red is repeatedly expressed when Curleys wife is described. It is also referred to as the colour of love and passion. In addition, the colour red could situate with danger and death. Death is foreshadowed at the end of the novella when she is killed by Lennie. Steinbeck makes us believe that Curleys wife is a dangerous person by talking to the ranchers but is just trying to make conversation as she is lonely. This makes the reader feel confused because initially we see her as nice but becomes mean throughout bits of the novella.

    Further into ‘Of Mice and Men’, when Curley's wife is presented as an attention seeker when she appears into Crooks room to ask where Curley is located, she again uses a weak excuse to talk to the men. “Lennie watched her, fascinated but Candy and Crooks were scowling down away from her eyes.” Firstly, the word “scowling” implies that they’re (Crooks and Candy) unhappy at Curley's wife as she is causing trouble but they do not want any. This makes the reader feel that she is unapproachable as she is danger to the ranchers. “down away from her eyes”, tells us that they’re unable to look at her in the eyes referring her to Medusa as if they look at her eyes they will be tricked and turned into stone. “The word “down” shows how the ranchers feel superior as they’re looking down at her and making her isolated. They look away as they don’t want her attention drawn and they’re scared of what she will do.
    However, as for Lennie he is “fascinated” by Curley’s wife and “watched” her as if she were an object and passively looking. There is a use of juxtaposition as when Lennie is fascinated and happy, Candy and Crooks are angry and scowling, a close of different responses. Steinbeck is trying to make us feel sympathy as she had done nothing wrong by asking where he was and only wanted to talk because she felt lonely. Although further on, she makes us feel as if she is a villain so our feelings on Curley’s wife change throughout the novella.

    On the other hand, Curley’s wife is seen only as a possession of Curley rather like a trophy wife. The fact that Steinbeck writes the characters as never once mentioning her real name prevents the likeliness of her having a personal relationship with anyone on the ranch, including her husband. But through turn, her authority in that she lives in the bosses house and is married to the bosses son prevents her from building a relationship with the ranchers as she is seen as a woman of power; despite the fact that she is very low in hierarchy of the ranch, in terms of her freedom and rights. This extreme loneliness changed Curley’s wife, leading her to knock down low stature on the ranch in order to make herself feel important and authoritative.

    This is linked to when she enters Crook’s room and says, “they left all the weak ones here” suggesting that she considers herself higher in stature than Crooks, Candy and Lennie even though she is displayed as so unimportant that Steinbeck does not even dignify her with a name. When she says “the weak ones” it connotates that Curley’s wife is calling weak; they’re alone with no one to defend them ie Slim and George. She believes that they can not compete with her and that they have low authority because they’re scared of her. This shows Curley’s wife is represented as a villain because she picks on people who can’t say anything against her to make her go away.

    Curley’s wife gives off the impression she is a floozy throughout the novel. When we first see her, her body language is deliberately provocative when she leans against a pole in the barn. ‘So her body was thrown forward.’ Knowing her beautiful womanly figure, and being the only woman on the farm, this suggestive posture reveals her need to be noticed and admired by the men. She talks very confidently and flirtatiously to George and Lennie even though they have just arrived and she doesn’t know them. She pretends to be looking for her husband and when told that he is not there Steinbeck writes: ‘“If he ain’t, I guess I better look some place else" she said playfully.’ This suggests her boredom in marriage and that she just wants company and fun. She talks ‘playfully’ as a young teenager would and obviously cares more about throwing herself towards people and enjoying male company than she does spending time with her husband.

    To summarize, i believe Curley’s wife, although being a complicated and often sinister character, never intended to be or thought of herself as a flirtatious or a mean person and although at times she was presented as one, precise hints always arose explaining why she was acting that way and that her true personality was not shining through. (1198 words)
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    (Original post by ehod123)
    Hey, my teacher won't mark my draft because he has no time to so could you guys just tell me what grade and mark you think I'm on please?
    Thanks!
    Explore how Steinbeck manipulates our response to Curleys Wife.
    Of Mice and Men was set during the 1930s in America and is set on a ranch similar to the one that Steinbeck himself worked on. The men of the ranch were chasing the american dream of success and living off the fat of the land, but the role of the Great Depression during this period made the achievement of this even harder. Steinbeck explores the contrasting lives of women as successful in the city and subservient in the house in how women were discriminated against. Curleys wife, the main female character in Of Mice and Men, feels violated and lonely as she is being flirtatious towards them. Steinbecks title immediately hints at the marginalisation of female characters in the novella, with an immediate emphasis on the role of ‘men’. ‘Men’ refers to the population as a whole and women at the time were ‘mice’ compared to ‘men’.

    Curleys wife. the main character and only female on the ranch in John Steinbeck's novella, “Of Mice and Men”. She is introduced at the beginning and in the end of the novella, her lack of judgment and flirtatiousness leads to her inevitable death at the hand of Lennie, confused and scared.

    She is first introduced by Candy, the swamper, who describes her from his perspective to George and Lennie. The fact that Curleys Wife is introduced through rumours means that the reader already has biased opinions of Curleys Wife before she even enters the section. Candy mentions that she's, “got the eye” implying that she is flirtatious and evil in the hint with the fact that she flirts with other men immediately after she is stated that she is married to Curley. Already, the reader is introduced to the thought that Curleys wife is an immoral “tart” which is expanded upon her first experience, which follows shortly after.

    Curleys wife is first seen in the doorway of the bunkhouse, asking about where his husband is, which is soon revealed as a weak excuse to communicate to the ranchers. She is said to be wearing a “red cotton house dress” and a pair of mules decorated with “bouquets of red ostrich feathers” emphasising her sexual presence as the red is repeatedly expressed when Curleys wife is described. It is also referred to as the colour of love and passion. In addition, the colour red could situate with danger and death. Death is foreshadowed at the end of the novella when she is killed by Lennie. Steinbeck makes us believe that Curleys wife is a dangerous person by talking to the ranchers but is just trying to make conversation as she is lonely. This makes the reader feel confused because initially we see her as nice but becomes mean throughout bits of the novella.

    Further into ‘Of Mice and Men’, when Curley's wife is presented as an attention seeker when she appears into Crooks room to ask where Curley is located, she again uses a weak excuse to talk to the men. “Lennie watched her, fascinated but Candy and Crooks were scowling down away from her eyes.” Firstly, the word “scowling” implies that they’re (Crooks and Candy) unhappy at Curley's wife as she is causing trouble but they do not want any. This makes the reader feel that she is unapproachable as she is danger to the ranchers. “down away from her eyes”, tells us that they’re unable to look at her in the eyes referring her to Medusa as if they look at her eyes they will be tricked and turned into stone. “The word “down” shows how the ranchers feel superior as they’re looking down at her and making her isolated. They look away as they don’t want her attention drawn and they’re scared of what she will do.
    However, as for Lennie he is “fascinated” by Curley’s wife and “watched” her as if she were an object and passively looking. There is a use of juxtaposition as when Lennie is fascinated and happy, Candy and Crooks are angry and scowling, a close of different responses. Steinbeck is trying to make us feel sympathy as she had done nothing wrong by asking where he was and only wanted to talk because she felt lonely. Although further on, she makes us feel as if she is a villain so our feelings on Curley’s wife change throughout the novella.

    On the other hand, Curley’s wife is seen only as a possession of Curley rather like a trophy wife. The fact that Steinbeck writes the characters as never once mentioning her real name prevents the likeliness of her having a personal relationship with anyone on the ranch, including her husband. But through turn, her authority in that she lives in the bosses house and is married to the bosses son prevents her from building a relationship with the ranchers as she is seen as a woman of power; despite the fact that she is very low in hierarchy of the ranch, in terms of her freedom and rights. This extreme loneliness changed Curley’s wife, leading her to knock down low stature on the ranch in order to make herself feel important and authoritative.

    This is linked to when she enters Crook’s room and says, “they left all the weak ones here” suggesting that she considers herself higher in stature than Crooks, Candy and Lennie even though she is displayed as so unimportant that Steinbeck does not even dignify her with a name. When she says “the weak ones” it connotates that Curley’s wife is calling weak; they’re alone with no one to defend them ie Slim and George. She believes that they can not compete with her and that they have low authority because they’re scared of her. This shows Curley’s wife is represented as a villain because she picks on people who can’t say anything against her to make her go away.

    Curley’s wife gives off the impression she is a floozy throughout the novel. When we first see her, her body language is deliberately provocative when she leans against a pole in the barn. ‘So her body was thrown forward.’ Knowing her beautiful womanly figure, and being the only woman on the farm, this suggestive posture reveals her need to be noticed and admired by the men. She talks very confidently and flirtatiously to George and Lennie even though they have just arrived and she doesn’t know them. She pretends to be looking for her husband and when told that he is not there Steinbeck writes: ‘“If he ain’t, I guess I better look some place else" she said playfully.’ This suggests her boredom in marriage and that she just wants company and fun. She talks ‘playfully’ as a young teenager would and obviously cares more about throwing herself towards people and enjoying male company than she does spending time with her husband.

    To summarize, i believe Curley’s wife, although being a complicated and often sinister character, never intended to be or thought of herself as a flirtatious or a mean person and although at times she was presented as one, precise hints always arose explaining why she was acting that way and that her true personality was not shining through. (1198 words)
    Basically, this is a fairly good essay. I'd give this 23/24 out of 30. so a B grade controlled assessment or A grade for exam. But, I think it has a lot more potential to go to 28+.

    A couple of things: you really need to identify the cultural significance of Curley's Wife being the only woman on the ranch, the way she is spoken about by the workers, and the fact she has no name. Why does Steinbeck present her in this way? What is he trying to communicate in what he does? Explore some of the deeper meanings of the book, by exploring the themes of the American Dream, Loneliness, Conflict. Second of all, try using synonyms or more sophisticated vocabulary to impress an examiner. Finally, never finish an english/history essay with I believe or to summarise. Finish with In conclusion, and sum up your points in the 3rd person. Also, give some historical basis to your argument throughout your essay and bring it together in the conclusion. For example, use some information about how migrant workers would travel and leave their wives at home. Many women were abandoned in unhappy marriages, and divorce was too expensive. And actually finally, briefly summarise in the conclusion why the novella is still important/relevant to date.
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    give it a U
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    (Original post by ehod123)
    Hey, my teacher won't mark my draft because he has no time to so could you guys just tell me what grade and mark you think I'm on please?
    Thanks!
    Explore how Steinbeck manipulates our response to Curleys Wife.
    Of Mice and Men was set during the 1930s in America and is set on a ranch similar to the one that Steinbeck himself worked on. The men of the ranch were chasing the american dream of success and living off the fat of the land, but the role of the Great Depression during this period made the achievement of this even harder. Steinbeck explores the contrasting lives of women as successful in the city and subservient in the house in how women were discriminated against. Curleys wife, the main female character in Of Mice and Men, feels violated and lonely as she is being flirtatious towards them. Steinbecks title immediately hints at the marginalisation of female characters in the novella, with an immediate emphasis on the role of ‘men’. ‘Men’ refers to the population as a whole and women at the time were ‘mice’ compared to ‘men’.

    Curleys wife. the main character and only female on the ranch in John Steinbeck's novella, “Of Mice and Men”. She is introduced at the beginning and in the end of the novella, her lack of judgment and flirtatiousness leads to her inevitable death at the hand of Lennie, confused and scared.

    She is first introduced by Candy, the swamper, who describes her from his perspective to George and Lennie. The fact that Curleys Wife is introduced through rumours means that the reader already has biased opinions of Curleys Wife before she even enters the section. Candy mentions that she's, “got the eye” implying that she is flirtatious and evil in the hint with the fact that she flirts with other men immediately after she is stated that she is married to Curley. Already, the reader is introduced to the thought that Curleys wife is an immoral “tart” which is expanded upon her first experience, which follows shortly after.

    Curleys wife is first seen in the doorway of the bunkhouse, asking about where his husband is, which is soon revealed as a weak excuse to communicate to the ranchers. She is said to be wearing a “red cotton house dress” and a pair of mules decorated with “bouquets of red ostrich feathers” emphasising her sexual presence as the red is repeatedly expressed when Curleys wife is described. It is also referred to as the colour of love and passion. In addition, the colour red could situate with danger and death. Death is foreshadowed at the end of the novella when she is killed by Lennie. Steinbeck makes us believe that Curleys wife is a dangerous person by talking to the ranchers but is just trying to make conversation as she is lonely. This makes the reader feel confused because initially we see her as nice but becomes mean throughout bits of the novella.

    Further into ‘Of Mice and Men’, when Curley's wife is presented as an attention seeker when she appears into Crooks room to ask where Curley is located, she again uses a weak excuse to talk to the men. “Lennie watched her, fascinated but Candy and Crooks were scowling down away from her eyes.” Firstly, the word “scowling” implies that they’re (Crooks and Candy) unhappy at Curley's wife as she is causing trouble but they do not want any. This makes the reader feel that she is unapproachable as she is danger to the ranchers. “down away from her eyes”, tells us that they’re unable to look at her in the eyes referring her to Medusa as if they look at her eyes they will be tricked and turned into stone. “The word “down” shows how the ranchers feel superior as they’re looking down at her and making her isolated. They look away as they don’t want her attention drawn and they’re scared of what she will do.
    However, as for Lennie he is “fascinated” by Curley’s wife and “watched” her as if she were an object and passively looking. There is a use of juxtaposition as when Lennie is fascinated and happy, Candy and Crooks are angry and scowling, a close of different responses. Steinbeck is trying to make us feel sympathy as she had done nothing wrong by asking where he was and only wanted to talk because she felt lonely. Although further on, she makes us feel as if she is a villain so our feelings on Curley’s wife change throughout the novella.

    On the other hand, Curley’s wife is seen only as a possession of Curley rather like a trophy wife. The fact that Steinbeck writes the characters as never once mentioning her real name prevents the likeliness of her having a personal relationship with anyone on the ranch, including her husband. But through turn, her authority in that she lives in the bosses house and is married to the bosses son prevents her from building a relationship with the ranchers as she is seen as a woman of power; despite the fact that she is very low in hierarchy of the ranch, in terms of her freedom and rights. This extreme loneliness changed Curley’s wife, leading her to knock down low stature on the ranch in order to make herself feel important and authoritative.

    This is linked to when she enters Crook’s room and says, “they left all the weak ones here” suggesting that she considers herself higher in stature than Crooks, Candy and Lennie even though she is displayed as so unimportant that Steinbeck does not even dignify her with a name. When she says “the weak ones” it connotates that Curley’s wife is calling weak; they’re alone with no one to defend them ie Slim and George. She believes that they can not compete with her and that they have low authority because they’re scared of her. This shows Curley’s wife is represented as a villain because she picks on people who can’t say anything against her to make her go away.

    Curley’s wife gives off the impression she is a floozy throughout the novel. When we first see her, her body language is deliberately provocative when she leans against a pole in the barn. ‘So her body was thrown forward.’ Knowing her beautiful womanly figure, and being the only woman on the farm, this suggestive posture reveals her need to be noticed and admired by the men. She talks very confidently and flirtatiously to George and Lennie even though they have just arrived and she doesn’t know them. She pretends to be looking for her husband and when told that he is not there Steinbeck writes: ‘“If he ain’t, I guess I better look some place else" she said playfully.’ This suggests her boredom in marriage and that she just wants company and fun. She talks ‘playfully’ as a young teenager would and obviously cares more about throwing herself towards people and enjoying male company than she does spending time with her husband.

    To summarize, i believe Curley’s wife, although being a complicated and often sinister character, never intended to be or thought of herself as a flirtatious or a mean person and although at times she was presented as one, precise hints always arose explaining why she was acting that way and that her true personality was not shining through. (1198 words)
    grade u because half of its from the internet change it
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    Its not lmao
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    All answers on here are worthy of a B or above - the latter earning 25/30 for me
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    if someone could give me an example of an essay with the question of John Steinbeck explores the theme of loneliness in his novella 'of mice and men'. Discuss the theme with reference to the main characters and explain what technique he used to develop this theme. that would be great
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    (Original post by cuttingkc)
    if someone could give me an example of an essay with the question of John Steinbeck explores the theme of loneliness in his novella 'of mice and men'. Discuss the theme with reference to the main characters and explain what technique he used to develop this theme. that would be great
    You're probably best starting your own thread rather than bumping an old one
 
 
 
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