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    (Original post by frogs r everywhere)
    I can not see what you have got to lose if you apply before you reach 18. They may consider you and if given an offer, you will have to wait until you turn 18.
    Thanks for your opinion
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    (Original post by frogs r everywhere)
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    Froggy, lol. Do you think 1A* 5As & 4Bs 2Cs & 3 distinctions & 1 Merit at BTEC will be able to get an offer at any "resit" medical school for 2015 entry? ( I went to a school with very bad results, I got the 2nd highest in my year)


    I see you said no for 5As so just wondering?
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    (Original post by AhmedDavid)
    Froggy, lol. Do you think 1A* 5As & 4Bs 2Cs & 3 distinctions & 1 Merit at BTEC will be able to get an offer at any "resit" medical school for 2015 entry? ( I went to a school with very bad results, I got the 2nd highest in my year)


    I see you said no for 5As so just wondering?
    Liverpool and UEA are out of the question due to GCSE's. Not sure about exeter and plymouth but you'd need a high Ukcat these would be your only options if your Gcses are good enough for them, not sure on this though.
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    (Original post by AhmedDavid)
    Froggy, lol. Do you think 1A* 5As & 4Bs 2Cs & 3 distinctions & 1 Merit at BTEC will be able to get an offer at any "resit" medical school for 2015 entry? ( I went to a school with very bad results, I got the 2nd highest in my year)


    I see you said no for 5As so just wondering?
    Your GCSE's are actually not that bad. I have worse GCSE's than you and i've gotten 2 interviews so don't give up hope!!
    Just put your head down and get those 3A's and a good UKCAT score and you stand a good chance.
    You can still apply to Bristol,Plymouth,Exeter,Leeds, Brighton & sussex, Glasgow,Barts, Aberdeen etc etc a lot of universities. Just check the applying to your strengths thing under medicine.

    It's not all about GCSE's guys. Achieved A-levels & a good UKCAT >>>> than a 'low' GCSE's
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    (Original post by AhmedDavid)
    Froggy, lol. Do you think 1A* 5As & 4Bs 2Cs & 3 distinctions & 1 Merit at BTEC will be able to get an offer at any "resit" medical school for 2015 entry? ( I went to a school with very bad results, I got the 2nd highest in my year)


    I see you said no for 5As so just wondering?
    Your GCSE's are absolutely fine for getting into medicine, but as I said before, it will restrict the number of universities that you will be eligible to apply to. Examples include Cardiff, Oxford, Birmingham, Kings, Liverpool etc. You will have to do your research and make sure that you are 110% certain that you have met their requirements/selection criteria. If you apply strategically, you do have a chance, especially if they put your application into context.

    Good luck
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    Just to clarify he is a resitter without extenuating circumstances so all the places you two have listed above are not an option. Going to a bad school won't count for anything i'm afraid if you don't met the requirments.
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    (Original post by Richyp22)
    Just to clarify he is a resitter without extenuating circumstances so all the places you two have listed above are not an option. Going to a bad school won't count for anything i'm afraid if you don't met the requirments.
    The universities listed above are examples of medical schools which he is not eligible to apply to.
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    (Original post by Richyp22)
    Just to clarify he is a resitter without extenuating circumstances so all the places you two have listed above are not an option. Going to a bad school won't count for anything i'm afraid if you don't met the requirments.
    Hey there, I do indeed have extenuating Circumstances but I have been reluctant to discuss them with my Head of year as I dont feel comfortable speaking to her about my personal life. God knows what I'm going to do when it comes to applying.


    (Original post by frogs r everywhere)
    Your GCSE's are absolutely fine for getting into medicine, but as I said before, it will restrict the number of universities that you will be eligible to apply to. Examples include Cardiff, Oxford, Birmingham, Kings, Liverpool etc. You will have to do your research and make sure that you are 110% certain that you have met their requirements/selection criteria. If you apply strategically, you do have a chance, especially if they put your application into context.

    Good luck
    Thanks a lot for that, I will try my best in applying wisely when it comes to the time however thinking of it now it just seems impossible

    I wish I had been a bit more mature a year ago or so, we'll have to wait and see what the future holds :l
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    anyone else not heard ought from Unis yet?
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    (Original post by richtea5)
    anyone else not heard ought from Unis yet?
    Yea I haven't but hopefully soon
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    (Original post by 06dwilliams)
    Yea I haven't but hopefully soon
    hmmm just got to be patient i guess probs plenty in the same boat
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    Hi guys, I'm hoping one of you can clear a little issue I have with ethics and law. If it is technically illegal to perform euthanasia or assisted suicide in this country, then what are you meant to do if both you and the patient feel it is the best decision for them? If that comes across in an interview, I don't want to be seen as doing something illegal, so how would one answer that in being compassionate but not technically breaking the law yet still doing best for the patient? And finally if again it is illegal to perform euthanasia and assisted suicide, then why is there a legal form agreeing to terminal life support and so on if the person is unconscious in a coma, paralysed etc. Isn't that related/similar to euthanasia/assisted suicide? How come that is legal and yet euthanasia/assisted suicide is illegal? I guess all I've come to in my thinking so far is that the legal document is pre-arranged and also for when the person is unconscious while euthanasia/assisted suicide is while the patient is conscious but I'm finding it hard to distinguish between them and why one is allowed and the other is not. I know with the legal document to terminate medication, life support etc.. you're not literally killing them by a lethal injection but we both know what's going to happen to them without their medication (death), that's why I find them related since they both end in the same way according to the patients' wish to die. (Sounds like waffle I know, though) I hope one of you at least can see what I'm trying to illustrate and can give me their own perspective. Who knows it might be thrown at you in your interview? Many Thanks
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    (Original post by PG593)
    Hi guys, I'm hoping one of you can clear a little issue I have with ethics and law. If it is technically illegal to perform euthanasia or assisted suicide in this country, then what are you meant to do if both you and the patient feel it is the best decision for them? If that comes across in an interview, I don't want to be seen as doing something illegal, so how would one answer that in being compassionate but not technically breaking the law yet still doing best for the patient? And finally if again it is illegal to perform euthanasia and assisted suicide, then why is there a legal form agreeing to terminal life support and so on if the person is unconscious in a coma, paralysed etc. Isn't that related/similar to euthanasia/assisted suicide? How come that is legal and yet euthanasia/assisted suicide is illegal? I guess all I've come to in my thinking so far is that the legal document is pre-arranged and also for when the person is unconscious while euthanasia/assisted suicide is while the patient is conscious but I'm finding it hard to distinguish between them and why one is allowed and the other is not. I know with the legal document to terminate medication, life support etc.. you're not literally killing them by a lethal injection but we both know what's going to happen to them without their medication (death), that's why I find them related since they both end in the same way according to the patients' wish to die. (Sounds like waffle I know, though) I hope one of you at least can see what I'm trying to illustrate and can give me their own perspective. Who knows it might be thrown at you in your interview? Many Thanks
    Check out the doctrine of double effect. That could give you a good idea


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    (Original post by PG593)
    Hi guys, I'm hoping one of you can clear a little issue I have with ethics and law. If it is technically illegal to perform euthanasia or assisted suicide in this country, then what are you meant to do if both you and the patient feel it is the best decision for them?
    As you have correctly mentioned, assisted suicide is illegal in the UK, regardless of circumstance. If it is in the best interest of the patient to die rather peacefully, you will have consult your team and advise them not to perform any invasive procedures (which may include the insertion of feeding tubes), and introduce the use of palliative pain killers. I can understand your viewpoint, however, if the patient is nearing to an end, you can not, by law, assist them to end their life. One can argue that this may give doctors the ability to take away a life of a person who could have improved and beaten all odds & uncertainties. The notion of playing God also comes into this. Doctors aren't God, they can not give or take life, and this notion can not have exceptions.

    If that comes across in an interview, I don't want to be seen as doing something illegal, so how would one answer that in being compassionate but not technically breaking the law yet still doing best for the patient?
    Taking a life is never an option. Again, I can see your reasoning behind this, and this is a rather controversial issue. When confronted with this question, it is good practice to identify the reasons for and against assisted suicide, and conclude that you will have to abide by the law. However, you will also maximise the comfort of the patient when he or she is undergoing palliative care. Death is not always a poignant experience. If the patient has died naturally, pain-free and with dignity, that is all you could do, and this would be classified as an achievement. The GMC would applaud you for this

    And finally if again it is illegal to perform euthanasia and assisted suicide, then why is there a legal form agreeing to terminal life support and so on if the person is unconscious in a coma, paralysed etc. Isn't that related/similar to euthanasia/assisted suicide? How come that is legal and yet euthanasia/assisted suicide is illegal?
    You are correct. Inserting a lethal injection and terminating life support will result to the same outcome. Death.
    On the other had, the legalities of the former, as explored above, are quite frankly, non-existent. Although you are performing "assisted suicide" out of compassion and benevolence of being a doctor, you are essentially, actively killing an individual, and that is what the law will label your actions as, and you will not be able to justify your actions in court.
    However, the latter, of terminating life sustaining treatment, is rather different. Your are not actively killing an individual, you are letting them die through natural means. There is a difference.

    Many Thanks
    No problem. If there is anything above which you found unclear or still disagree with (I am, after all, a medicine applicant and not some qualified legal expert), don't hesitate to quote me back.

    EDIT: Dr.Ugs also mentioned a doctrine above, should be a good read.
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    So has anyone here received at least one interview invitation?
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    (Original post by SiMan)
    So has anyone here received at least one interview invitation?
    If you check the previous pages, a couple of people have received interview invites from more than one uni
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    (Original post by frogs r everywhere)
    As you have correctly mentioned, assisted suicide is illegal in the UK, regardless of circumstance. If it is in the best interest of the patient to die rather peacefully, you will have consult your team and advise them not to perform any invasive procedures (which may include the insertion of feeding tubes), and introduce the use of palliative pain killers. I can understand your viewpoint, however, if the patient is nearing to an end, you can not, by law, assist them to end their life. One can argue that this may give doctors the ability to take away a life of a person who could have improved and beaten all odds & uncertainties. The notion of playing God also comes into this. Doctors aren't God, they can not give or take life, and this notion can not have exceptions.



    Taking a life is never an option. Again, I can see your reasoning behind this, and this is a rather controversial issue. When confronted with this question, it is good practice to identify the reasons for and against assisted suicide, and conclude that you will have to abide by the law. However, you will also maximise the comfort of the patient when he or she is undergoing palliative care. Death is not always a poignant experience. If the patient has died naturally, pain-free and with dignity, that is all you could do, and this would be classified as an achievement. The GMC would applaud you for this



    You are correct. Inserting a lethal injection and terminating life support will result to the same outcome. Death.
    On the other had, the legalities of the former, as explored above, are quite frankly, non-existent. Although you are performing "assisted suicide" out of compassion and benevolence of being a doctor, you are essentially, actively killing an individual, and that is what the law will label your actions as, and you will not be able to justify your actions in court.
    However, the latter, of terminating life sustaining treatment, is rather different. Your are not actively killing an individual, you are letting them die through natural means. There is a difference.



    No problem. If there is anything above which you found unclear or still disagree with (I am, after all, a medicine applicant and not some qualified legal expert), don't hesitate to quote me back.

    EDIT: Dr.Ugs also mentioned a doctrine above, should be a good read.
    (Original post by Dr.Ugs)
    Check out the doctrine of double effect. That could give you a good idea


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Cheers guys, I guess the main point as I've realised myself this morning is letting them die by natural means as opposed to actively killing them. Thanks for the clarification frogs (would've given you rep but it won't let me )
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    (Original post by Joannywhite)
    If you check the previous pages, a couple of people have received interview invites from more than one uni
    Oh okay thanks.. and yeah, wow been ages since I came to this thread and lots happened.
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    (Original post by SiMan)
    Oh okay thanks.. and yeah, wow been ages since I came to this thread and lots happened.
    Yeah a lot has happened. So have u heard anything yet?
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    (Original post by Joannywhite)
    Yeah a lot has happened. So have u heard anything yet?
    No, but getting kinda worried. But at least haven't heard anything bad either.
 
 
 
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