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    (Original post by ameelia22)
    Guys when a doctor locums is that a bit like when nurses do agency work?
    Yes you can think of it similar to that! Locum doctors tend to work in hospitals/GP Practices and some work in both settings. Hope that helps
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    (Original post by Adriana25)
    Hello, can anyone suggest any good interview courses? I had three I interviews but got rejected by all :/


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    Hi Adriana25, I wouldn't recommend spending a lot on expensive courses. I would recommend the ISC Medical School Interview Book. It breaks down potential topics really well. Definitely be yourself and practice with friends/family members. It's also worth getting practice answering questions in a time limit, especially if you are going for MMI interview style. Another useful thing to do is make spider-charts of your work exp (what you have learnt) so you can quickly skim over them in your interview, as your work exp will definitely form the backbone to a lot of questions. Hope that helps
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    (Original post by PocketMerlin)
    I did the AceMedicine course last November and that was pretty fantastic. The ISC book helps so so much as well, I think that the best thing to do is mix resources: the ISC book has hundreds of practice questions in, and you can use the techniques that are taught to you on interview courses to answer those questions when you're practising.
    Interview courses are also really good for giving you BAD examples of how to answer questions. Most courses will be interactive so at some point everyone has a chance to answer a practice question and have their response dissected, so you do have the chance to see what a bad response looks like, which can be very helpful.
    Thank you for your help! It sounds really good I will definitely look into it!


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    (Original post by Spiggy)
    Hi Adriana25, I wouldn't recommend spending a lot on expensive courses. I would recommend the ISC Medical School Interview Book. It breaks down potential topics really well. Definitely be yourself and practice with friends/family members. It's also worth getting practice answering questions in a time limit, especially if you are going for MMI interview style. Another useful thing to do is make spider-charts of your work exp (what you have learnt) so you can quickly skim over them in your interview, as your work exp will definitely form the backbone to a lot of questions. Hope that helps
    Hello thank you for your help. I will definitely get that book, many people have suggested it also I really like the spider diagram! I found that sometimes I just went blank because I was under pressure, but a spider diagram will make it simpler and it'll make it easier to remind myself everything before I go in. Hopefully I'll get a chance to prove myself again 😬


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    (Original post by Adriana25)
    Hello thank you for your help. I will definitely get that book, many people have suggested it also I really like the spider diagram! I found that sometimes I just went blank because I was under pressure, but a spider diagram will make it simpler and it'll make it easier to remind myself everything before I go in. Hopefully I'll get a chance to prove myself again ������


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    Not a problem!! I definitely found spider diagrams useful, more efficient than reading blocks of text! It may also be useful to make charts for the key things each uni offers, role of a doctor (add your experiences) and the course style You will get better with practice!
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    (Original post by Adriana25)
    Thank you for your help! It sounds really good I will definitely look into it!


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    No problem. If you really cannot afford to spend money on a course (AceMedicine was £127, plus you have travel costs to consider) then definitely check out the Medicine Interview thread for 2014, as people have posted links to a lot of resources plus there are so many tips/questions there.
    The general technique that you are taught at interview courses for formal interview stations (i.e traditional interview format or a station in an MMI interview which is formatted in a similar way) is "STARR" (or some other variation of this), which is Situation Task Action Result Reflect. So for example when asked 'tell me about a time where you worked in a team' you would use the technique to not just describe the situation but to show what you learned from it. Anecdotes are also highlighted as something that you should have prepared for the interview (not rehearsed, but almost 'bullet-pointed' in your head) for questions such as those about work experience, a difficult situation, a time where you were a leader/team member, ect.
    I found that the interview course was much more helpful for MMI interview techniques, getting a concise summary of changes within the NHS, ect. You could probably get away with just doing mock interviews and using the ISC book if you don't want to pay for a course, just choose someone that you find slightly intimidating to interview you.
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    Thank you all for the help!! They're definitely great ideas on how I can improve and prepare more efficiently! I just need to get the grades now and after my chemistry test on Monday I'm scared that I won't ://


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    Hi guys, I'm in second year of college atm, pretty much messed up my first year so this year I've done two AS exam resits to boost my overall grade up but it won't be enough to get the grades needed for medicine. I didn't apply to uni this year because I was going to apply to Biomedical science & then re-apply to medicine after my first yr, but after some time I've decided that would be a waste of time & unfair to some people who actually want to do biomedicine if I were to get accepted and not even want to do it as I'd be taking up a place for a yr only to change courses. So a gap year is my best option. I can hopefully resit some exams to get the grades needed, if not more. Work experience is also a motive since I have no real experience med schools look for in an applicant. As we all know medicine UCAS deadlines are earlier than the rest, being in October. So this coming October, (Oct 2014) I would have already received my A level results and hopefully started work. My question is, when writing my personal statement, I would obviously include my plans in the gap year, however would saying, these are my A level grades (for example ABC) and after resitting exams I'll hopefully bring them up to AAA, be enough to get me a place in September 2015, or would I only get a place after my results come out for my resits (August 2015) meaning I would then have to apply for medicine by Oct 2015, therefore if I get accepted, start uni in Sept 2016. So would taking this yr off 2014/2015 mean I'd start uni in Sept 2016, so two years instead of one? Sorry for the long essay, just want to know what I'm doing & you guys seem like you've got everything sorted! Thanks in advance
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    (Original post by Adriana25)
    Hello, can anyone suggest any good interview courses? I had three I interviews but got rejected by all :/


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    My daughter was the same last year - 3 i/vs and 3 rejections. She did the Dr Prep interview course and thought it was fantastic. It's 2 days and includes your own videoed mock interview at the end with feedback.Well worth the £295 in London (also in York £250) and places are filling up already. This year she had 4 interviews and 4 offers. She said the Dr Prep course definitely helped as well as 6 weeks with Gap Medics in Tanzania. Also, acknowledging that in interview her mind went blank occasionally (due to nerves) she applied to East Anglia this year as in their MMI you get the question/ scenario outside the door and have 5 mins to prepare/ compose yourself before you go in. She was the most confident about this interview. She also applied to Cardiff, Nottingham and Durham (which she has firmed). Re personal statement : At Cardiff, they have the personal statement in front of them and ask some questions on it, whereas in Durham, the interviewers have not seen your personal statement so you can steer the interview to talk about what you want to talk about. If you are hot on ethical scenarios, then consider Nottingham as a large proportion of the interview is on this.
    Good Luck - and remember there are lots of others in your position - in fact at Cardiff and East Anglia, the day she was interviewed was a reapplicant interview day. The year off will do you good and you will be refreshed and raring to go when you do start - my daughter is now spending 3 1/2 months at Camp America. You can do it.....
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    (Original post by mm179)
    Hi guys, I'm in second year of college atm, pretty much messed up my first year so this year I've done two AS exam resits to boost my overall grade up but it won't be enough to get the grades needed for medicine. I didn't apply to uni this year because I was going to apply to Biomedical science & then re-apply to medicine after my first yr, but after some time I've decided that would be a waste of time & unfair to some people who actually want to do biomedicine if I were to get accepted and not even want to do it as I'd be taking up a place for a yr only to change courses.
    FYI: Being able to change courses in your first year is still very uncommon and extremely competitive, especially on a biomedicine degree. As well as this, at some universities they will already require you to have competitive A-level grades (e.g. AAB at Sheffield or something from what I remember reading) in order to even be considered for switching courses.

    So a gap year is my best option. I can hopefully resit some exams to get the grades needed, if not more.
    Whilst it's certainly a viable option, I would argue against it being the best option. You wouldn't be a gap year student like most of us are, you would be a resit student. Very few universities accept resit students and most still require you to come out of your A-levels with half-decent grades. I think there are a few that will only consider you if you drop 1 grade (AAB) after your first sitting (for example BSMS). If you got grades any lower, I would really really rethink resitting with a mind to still apply for medicine without any mitigating circumstances.

    Work experience is also a motive since I have no real experience med schools look for in an applicant. As we all know medicine UCAS deadlines are earlier than the rest, being in October. So this coming October, (Oct 2014) I would have already received my A level results and hopefully started work.

    My question is, when writing my personal statement, I would obviously include my plans in the gap year, however would saying, these are my A level grades (for example ABC) and after resitting exams I'll hopefully bring them up to AAA, be enough to get me a place in September 2015,
    Work experience is crucial to gaining a place in medical school. Make sure you get this sorted.

    Yes you could do the above, but you would have to scrupulously check with the admission offices of said university to ensure they would even consider your application.

    Have a look at the TSR Wiki for a useful guide into medical school resit policies. Without mitigating circumstances, the only places you are able to apply to are Exeter, Plymouth, UEA (providing you get at least ABB this time around) and BSMS (providing you get at least AAB this time around).
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    This is a question for anyone else who works bank in the NHS: when it comes to leaving work, what process do we have go through? Do we simply ask to be taken off the bank or do we go through the same process as we would with full time work? Also, do we have to give 4 weeks notice as with full time/part time work or not?
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    (Original post by mm179)
    Hi guys, I'm in second year of college atm, pretty much messed up my first year so this year I've done two AS exam resits to boost my overall grade up but it won't be enough to get the grades needed for medicine. I didn't apply to uni this year because I was going to apply to Biomedical science & then re-apply to medicine after my first yr, but after some time I've decided that would be a waste of time & unfair to some people who actually want to do biomedicine if I were to get accepted and not even want to do it as I'd be taking up a place for a yr only to change courses. So a gap year is my best option. I can hopefully resit some exams to get the grades needed, if not more. Work experience is also a motive since I have no real experience med schools look for in an applicant. As we all know medicine UCAS deadlines are earlier than the rest, being in October. So this coming October, (Oct 2014) I would have already received my A level results and hopefully started work. My question is, when writing my personal statement, I would obviously include my plans in the gap year, however would saying, these are my A level grades (for example ABC) and after resitting exams I'll hopefully bring them up to AAA, be enough to get me a place in September 2015, or would I only get a place after my results come out for my resits (August 2015) meaning I would then have to apply for medicine by Oct 2015, therefore if I get accepted, start uni in Sept 2016. So would taking this yr off 2014/2015 mean I'd start uni in Sept 2016, so two years instead of one? Sorry for the long essay, just want to know what I'm doing & you guys seem like you've got everything sorted! Thanks in advance
    Yeah the problem as someone else has said is that most unis don't accept resitters. Do you qualify for any of the widening participation courses? Southampton BM6, Kings EDMP, Access to Leeds? They have lower entry requirements and end up with the same medical degree. Southampton for example (the one I did so know most about) has entry requirements of BBC and you just do an extra year at the start of your medical degree.

    Just a thought

    (Edit: there are other criteria to meet like socioeconomic factors) but it is something to consider )
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    Hi all, what position can i apply for in HCA? I have no other qualifications except gcse's and A levels.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by PocketMerlin)
    This is a question for anyone else who works bank in the NHS: when it comes to leaving work, what process do we have go through? Do we simply ask to be taken off the bank or do we go through the same process as we would with full time work? Also, do we have to give 4 weeks notice as with full time/part time work or not?
    with my trust i just dont call and ask for work. after 6 months im automatically taken off the bank register. hope this helps
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    (Original post by mohid khan)
    hi all, what position can i apply for in hca? I have no other qualifications except gcse's and a levels.

    thanks :d

    i refuse to respond to this out of principle!!!


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    (Original post by Hugby1)
    with my trust i just dont call and ask for work. after 6 months im automatically taken off the bank register. hope this helps
    I see. That makes sense, but with my trust they actually actively text me and ask me if I want to work. Thanks anyway, I understand that the organisation of bank work varies quite a lot between different trusts, so I guess I'll just have to ask Employment Services.
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    (Original post by Mohid Khan)
    Hi all, what position can i apply for in HCA? I have no other qualifications except gcse's and A levels.

    Thanks
    Not sure if you mean 'what position can I apply for besides HCA' or 'what position can I apply for in healthcare' ect, but GCSEs and A-levels are basically the only qualifications you need. Some jobs in the NHS (deliveries, ect) may ask for a driving license, but besides that it's all about experience.
    In terms of what you can apply for, you can probably find a vacancy in one of the following roles: porter, medical lab assistant, office assistant/secretarial assistant/clerk, clinical support worker/healthcare assistant/theatre support worker, domestic.
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    So now i'm done with my exams, i'm kind of wanting to prepare for my gap year and I have a few things in mind, firstly and most importantly I think I will need to improve my UKCAT score (685 last year) and then improve my personal statement. On top of this I will try to find a job/work experience in health care.

    Is it more common to get a full time job or work experience in health care, i hear a lot of people apply to become a HCA. How competitive is this/is it relatively easy to get the job and do other options exist, such as?

    Also I obviously haven't got my grades yet which is why I'm reluctant to start planning everything like through gap medics (which I plan to do towards the end of the gap year, probably around now in a years time), interview mentor/courses, UKCAT courses and apply for positions throughout the NHS because I heard from other sources that it may take at least 3 months of searching to get a job.


    Finally, is there anything I should be focusing on right now that I haven't mentioned above, anything I might be doing wrong in my plan for my upcoming gap year?

    Sorry, the posts a bit long. Thought I could seek some advice from the experienced!
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    Sorry one more question! From the post above I just found out about the widening access course to medicine, why are the entry requirements lowered and what is stopping reapplicants applying for these courses instead? I understand that some disallow you if you have more than one science but some universities don't care, so other than being a year long whats wrong with this?
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    (Original post by blissfully)

    Is it more common to get a full time job or work experience in health care, i hear a lot of people apply to become a HCA. How competitive is this/is it relatively easy to get the job and do other options exist, such as?
    Not as many re-applicants work as HCA's as you may think. In terms of the difficulty of getting a job as a HCA, it really depends on the amount of applicants that have applied. At one of my interviews, 200 applicants applied for one post. But then again, the quality of these applicants would also need to be considered. You just need to apply as much as possible and let you Personal Statement revolve around the 'Person Specification' and 'desired qualities'.

    Yes. Becoming a HCA in one of the most stressful specialities has given me a fantastic insight (A&E) in what becoming doctor is actually all about, other jobs may not give you the same insight, but you would certainly develop similar qualities that medical schools look for. Examples include working in retail, restaurants, schools, residential homes (I recommend this) etc. Some go abroad to take up work. Someone I met went to Australia to work as an Accounting assistant. It really depends on what you want to do and the options that will open up to you.


    Also I obviously haven't got my grades yet which is why I'm reluctant to start planning everything like through gap medics (which I plan to do towards the end of the gap year, probably around now in a years time), interview mentor/courses, UKCAT courses and apply for positions throughout the NHS because I heard from other sources that it may take at least 3 months of searching to get a job.
    You are correct in saying that looking for jobs can take time. However, if you can not gain a job in healthcare, I would consider applying for a range of sectors as I mentioned above. If you search hard enough, the chance of you landing on an offer is very high. Job seeking isn't UCAS, you can apply for 1000's of jobs, not just 4, if you so desire. (exaggerating a bit here).

    I arranged my trip to South Africa in March, after all my interviews, job search, UKCAT ,medicine offers etc. rather than booking it at such an early and uncertain time period.

    Finally, is there anything I should be focusing on right now that I haven't mentioned above, anything I might be doing wrong in my plan for my upcoming gap year?
    HAVE FUN!

    Sorry one more question! From the post above I just found out about the widening access course to medicine, why are the entry requirements lowered and what is stopping reapplicants applying for these courses instead? I understand that some disallow you if you have more than one science but some universities don't care, so other than being a year long whats wrong with this?
    There are three ways you may be eligible of widening access courses. Not everyone is eligible for these. They usually include a Year 0 which is a foundation year, and leads onto Year 1 of the standard Medicine course.

    Type 1- Incorrect A-levels to apply for Medicine. (having no prior Scientific knowledge past GCSE)

    Type 2- Coming from a low socio-economic background. This is where grades are lowered for those who come from more challenging predicaments. (very bad school, parents who have low pay jobs and didn't go to uni, extenuating circumstance, living in a deprived area etc.)

    Type 3- Graduates that studied BA's instead of BSc's. (such as Art, History French etc instead of Biomed, Chemistry, Physiology etc.)

    What's wrong with it? Nothing. You just need to be eligible and going through this route is still competitive and if I recall correctly, only a handful of universities offer this. If you have AAA, I would advise applying via the standard A100 route.

    Hope this helps,


    Frogs xD
 
 
 
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