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    (Original post by kimsiclez)
    Goodness! Sounds like it's harder to get a HCA post than to get an offer for medicine! Are you still working as a HCA now? How much/often did you work in a week?

    I'm finding it difficult just to find vacancies. Of the 5 or so listed in my area only 2 don't require any previous experience of working in the NHS/healthcare environment
    Is it literally 5 vacancies in total, or just 5 HCA posts?
    Either way...where an earth in the country do you live thats so desolate?!

    (Original post by Toppy)
    xx
    Sorry, some more questions
    Do you think it's easier/better/possible to get a HCA post - by starting on bank rather than starting on a ward?
    I sort of mention my gap year in the additional information section - should this be taken out immediately? I sort of wanted to point out I wouldn't start work till my exams where over...
    On an outpatient ward is it less patient and more domestic?


    Thanks for all of your tips and help!
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    (Original post by ameelia22)
    Is it literally 5 vacancies in total, or just 5 HCA posts?
    Either way...where an earth in the country do you live thats so desolate?!



    Sorry, some more questions
    Do you think it's easier/better/possible to get a HCA post - by starting on bank rather than starting on a ward?
    I sort of mention my gap year in the additional information section - should this be taken out immediately? I sort of wanted to point out I wouldn't start work till my exams where over...
    On an outpatient ward is it less patient and more domestic?


    Thanks for all of your tips and help!
    I think you are still interviewed for bank so it's probably just as hard. I don't know for sure whether it's better as I've never done it but I'm guessing bank may be better experience as you have the opportunity to see more wards.

    I'm not sure about mentioning your gap year. I suppose you could keep it as your employer will likely find out anyway. Not sure. I wouldn't worry about the not starting work thing until exams are over. Just make sure you let them know about the exams when they give you the offer. I actually had problems doing just this as I left it quite late to tell them so had to beg to let me start later! It wasn't fair on them in retrospect but exams are important.

    You probably actually see more patients in outpatients as most people who go to hospital seem to have a followup in outpatients but most patients are actually very well normally. It's like a GP practice really - acutely unwell patients don't go so caring experience is more limited. It is there though.
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    (Original post by kimsiclez)
    Goodness! Sounds like it's harder to get a HCA post than to get an offer for medicine! Are you still working as a HCA now? How much/often did you work in a week?




    I'm finding it difficult just to find vacancies. Of the 5 or so listed in my area only 2 don't require any previous experience of working in the NHS/healthcare environment
    i've recently started applying to private hospitals, might be worth a shot. Care homes are ALWAYS recruiting, might have to be bank post though
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    (Original post by Toppy)
    I think you are still interviewed for bank so it's probably just as hard. I don't know for sure whether it's better as I've never done it but I'm guessing bank may be better experience as you have the opportunity to see more wards.

    I'm not sure about mentioning your gap year. I suppose you could keep it as your employer will likely find out anyway. Not sure. I wouldn't worry about the not starting work thing until exams are over. Just make sure you let them know about the exams when they give you the offer. I actually had problems doing just this as I left it quite late to tell them so had to beg to let me start later! It wasn't fair on them in retrospect but exams are important.

    You probably actually see more patients in outpatients as most people who go to hospital seem to have a followup in outpatients but most patients are actually very well normally. It's like a GP practice really - acutely unwell patients don't go so caring experience is more limited. It is there though.
    Well things have had a dramatic turn around since I last came onto TSR. This morning I have been invited to attend a literacy-numeracy test thing, I.E. I have been shortlisted. I'm a bit worried in case they want to ask nursey-type-questions, like what certain abbreviations stand for, of which I would have no idea. Can you suggest what to do that might help?

    This job is a Clinical Support Worker - Bank job.
    I'm not quite sure what it means and how / if it's different from a HCA. Do you have any ideas? I've been through the Job Description and it just sounds like HCA stuff...

    Outpatient stuff actually sounds like a lot more fun! If you could pick, your ideal ward to be a HCA on, what would it be, and why?

    Sorry to keep bugging you, but your the type of person I need to sit in a costa with for 4 hours and get to know everything about your whole experience
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    (Original post by ameelia22)
    Well things have had a dramatic turn around since I last came onto TSR. This morning I have been invited to attend a literacy-numeracy test thing, I.E. I have been shortlisted. I'm a bit worried in case they want to ask nursey-type-questions, like what certain abbreviations stand for, of which I would have no idea. Can you suggest what to do that might help?

    This job is a Clinical Support Worker - Bank job.
    I'm not quite sure what it means and how / if it's different from a HCA. Do you have any ideas? I've been through the Job Description and it just sounds like HCA stuff...

    Outpatient stuff actually sounds like a lot more fun! If you could pick, your ideal ward to be a HCA on, what would it be, and why?

    Sorry to keep bugging you, but your the type of person I need to sit in a costa with for 4 hours and get to know everything about your whole experience
    Hey, (Toppy sorry if I'm stealing your thunder here). I've worked as a HCA for 5 months on a ward, so I've had a different experience to Toppy as he was on outpatients. Regarding the Literacy/Numeracy test, don't worry at all. It's very simple calculation, it's basically GCSE standard Maths, not even that to be honest. They just ask you to work out things like simple ratios and what not, trust me, you will be okay. For the English, you just have to be able to write a simple story/recollection of an account. It's really not hard at all, you have no need to worry.

    Regarding your questions to Toppy about the outpatients and stuff (which I'm sure he'll answer). I'll put it to you this way, if you want an easier HCA job, deffo choose outpatients, deffo deffo choose outpatients. Ward HCA work can get heavy, I'm not putting you off, just letting you know. BUT and this is a big BUT, the amount of stuff I've learnt and seen on the ward, you will not see working in outpatients. Despite the odd really busy days, the experiences I've seen and learnt are second to none, and they have definitely made me feel like I can be a better doctor, and do better in Medicine.
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    (Original post by Nandos94)
    Hey, (Toppy sorry if I'm stealing your thunder here). I've worked as a HCA for 5 months on a ward, so I've had a different experience to Toppy as he was on outpatients. Regarding the Literacy/Numeracy test, don't worry at all. It's very simple calculation, it's basically GCSE standard Maths, not even that to be honest. They just ask you to work out things like simple ratios and what not, trust me, you will be okay. For the English, you just have to be able to write a simple story/recollection of an account. It's really not hard at all, you have no need to worry.

    Regarding your questions to Toppy about the outpatients and stuff (which I'm sure he'll answer). I'll put it to you this way, if you want an easier HCA job, deffo choose outpatients, deffo deffo choose outpatients. Ward HCA work can get heavy, I'm not putting you off, just letting you know. BUT and this is a big BUT, the amount of stuff I've learnt and seen on the ward, you will not see working in outpatients. Despite the odd really busy days, the experiences I've seen and learnt are second to none, and they have definitely made me feel like I can be a better doctor, and do better in Medicine.

    I never took the numeracy test so I don't know about that.

    I agree with what you say about outpatients though. Obviously I haven't done ward work but outpatients has been easier than I expected.

    I can see why you might be attracted to outpatients. I was. Hours are predictable, working conditions are good and I always leave on time. Plus, holiday is normally always available. But, as Nandos said, you'll probably get better experience elsewhere, and enjoy yourself more.

    Also, I think clinical support worker is the same as an HCA :-)
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    (Original post by Toppy)
    x
    Can I just add, Ward work is still amazing, you do leave on time (most of the time), although this depends on the ward/staff/nurse in charge. Holiday depends on your ward manager, however as I found out this year, even with short notice, if it is something important like a medical interview, they are usually very accommodating. If it's cos you want a night out, expect to get a no!

    So yeah Outpatients = easier, still learn stuff, better hours. Ward = more exciting, more to learn, better overall experience, harder but you won't notice, until you do a shift in both . That's just my view
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    Oh you angels. :lovehug:
    (Original post by Toppy)
    x
    (Original post by Nandos94)
    x
    Thanks for that It also says a 'Practical Assessment' before interview too - what an earth is that? I'm not gonna lie, the easy stuff does sound like lovely, easy money. And that's what makes it so appealing! However, as much as i'll regret saying this; I do want to do the ****ty stuff too. I imagine most HCA's think that all doctors should see it from their point of view, and it's a fantastic opportunity too IMO.


    How are you both finding the pay for your gap years? Is it managing to uphold all the wild gap year times?

    And also, I was hoping that since I would be in the hospital anyways, it would be easier to arrange to see surgeries and stuff of patients on my ward in my free time? Or does that sound ridiculous?


    Also as a Bank clinical assistant could I pick up every shift I wanted to? I.E. Could I do 12 hours shifts 5 days in a row if I wanted to?

    Lastly, how did you guys find it in the beginning? I'm so worried, I'm going to walk in, be told to start fetching things, making notes of things, doing this that the other, and I won't have a clue what to do or where to go?!
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    (Original post by ameelia22)
    x
    I'm clearly using this help as a means to avoid doing the work for my event next week
    I'm not going to lie, I've got no idea what you'll have to do in the practical assessment. I didn't have one, I just had an interview...
    See, yes HCA work is dirty, it can be very dirty, but honestly you just take it on the chin and get on with it. There is much more to it than just cleaning, as you'll realise. I think the main thing you see, is you see doctors from another point of view. You quickly learn how you can be a better doctor, without even having started medical school. It just gives you that backing to think about stuff through medical school. (well this is what I think will happen). Something I think it really helped me is having a real view on death,
    Expand
    I had someone have a cardiac arrest while me and another nurse were holding him, in my first week.
    So yeah, I've got a real view on death now, and I feel I can deal with it better, and on the ward, you do last offices.

    Regarding the pay, I get extra "london" allowance, and to be honest, yeah I find that I have more than enough money for my gap year. My real stuff is starting now, but if you budget (a little) you'll have enough to have a blast and have some for uni
    Organising stuff depends on how well you establish yourself with your charge nurses and the doctors on your ward. Like I managed to go along with the charge nurse to see some surgery prep, but I've already seen actual surgery abroad. Seeing actual surgery may be hard, as F1's struggle to see it tbh.
    I think you can so all those shifts in a row, but you won't want too trust me, it is tiring. Or there may be a limit, im not actually sure so check! but as bank, you just request however many shifts you want, when they're available.

    You're given training before you start, usually you have a period where you're supernumerary, which means you will work with a experienced HCA for a week or two before you do stuff on your own. Well that's how it worked on my ward, so you shouldn't be thrown straight into the deep end. but if you're keen, you should pick it up rather quickly.
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    I applied to Nottingham, Sheffield, Newcastle and Leeds, got an interview at Newcastle but got rejected :/ looking at other unis to apply to, is anyone else considering going for perhaps less... prestigious? (not sure if thats the right word) universities. Obviously all the ones I applied for are Russell group/ red brick and maybe I didn't consider some of the other less well known ones... just wondering if others are rethinking their choices and going for ones they wouldnt have considered or should I be aiming just as high even after rejection? orrr am I just being a uni snob and it really doesn't matter as long as I get in?
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    (Original post by Nandos94)
    x
    Well that's a bit worrying. I may e-mail and ask, if I get through to that stage. Do you have any idea what's up with the shortlisting? Is it like, once i'm shortlisted, I'm basically in, or is it more like, it gets tougher the further you get into the selection process?

    Oh lord, last offices sound terrifying. I saw once, as a nurse moved a body on it's side, the body made some weird sound as a result of the last trapped wind came out or something. Hopefully I will just get used to it.

    Oooh er, get you! London allowance eh! What i'm hoping is, that the first few wage packets will allow me to learn how to drive, buy a car, and get insured. Perhaps I'm getting overexcited lol

    Yeah, i've seen surgery on wexp and stuff before, and I loved it, so I was hoping there would be more of that experience.

    And thankgod, that puts my mind at rest, hopefully Bank or otherwise, I'll be given enough "training"!
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    (Original post by Nandos94)
    Can I just add, Ward work is still amazing, you do leave on time (most of the time), although this depends on the ward/staff/nurse in charge. Holiday depends on your ward manager, however as I found out this year, even with short notice, if it is something important like a medical interview, they are usually very accommodating. If it's cos you want a night out, expect to get a no!

    So yeah Outpatients = easier, still learn stuff, better hours. Ward = more exciting, more to learn, better overall experience, harder but you won't notice, until you do a shift in both . That's just my view
    I feel the same - holiday can be found with short notice if it's important. Outpatients is easier but you can probably learn more on a ward.
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    (Original post by ameelia22)
    Oh you angels. :lovehug:




    Thanks for that It also says a 'Practical Assessment' before interview too - what an earth is that? I'm not gonna lie, the easy stuff does sound like lovely, easy money. And that's what makes it so appealing! However, as much as i'll regret saying this; I do want to do the ****ty stuff too. I imagine most HCA's think that all doctors should see it from their point of view, and it's a fantastic opportunity too IMO.


    How are you both finding the pay for your gap years? Is it managing to uphold all the wild gap year times?

    And also, I was hoping that since I would be in the hospital anyways, it would be easier to arrange to see surgeries and stuff of patients on my ward in my free time? Or does that sound ridiculous?


    Also as a Bank clinical assistant could I pick up every shift I wanted to? I.E. Could I do 12 hours shifts 5 days in a row if I wanted to?

    Lastly, how did you guys find it in the beginning? I'm so worried, I'm going to walk in, be told to start fetching things, making notes of things, doing this that the other, and I won't have a clue what to do or where to go?!
    No idea what a Practical Assessment is but it's probably not difficult.

    The easy stuff in outpatients is quite easy money (I'm still working harder then my friends who aren't in the NHS though) but I think I'm proof an easy well-paid job is not always an ideal situation. The first month or so was great but I now would happily take a pay cut to work on wards (though I wouldn't have to - the pay is the same on wards). Not that outpatients is bad - I'd just rather spend my time doing work I enjoy more and earning less than something I don't and earning more.

    Pay is plenty. I'm earning quite a bit more than my friends on gap years and it'll easily get you by . Getting my first pay slip was a great moment! I, like Ameelia, also get more for working in London which is quite quite lucky for me as I'm right on the edge of London so I don't really need it!

    It's definitely definitely easier to get work experience-style stuff arranged. Most of my work achieves more than work experience (actually help treat the patients is very valuable) but I also spend a lot of my day with surgeons (general, orthopaedic) and I'm trying to organise sitting in on some surgery. Nurse won't let me do it during my working hours (unsurprisingly!) so the trouble is finding a time when surgery happens and where I'm not actually working! I'm considering taking a day off for it but we'll see. I'm desperate to see 2 procedures in particular - hip replacements and cataract surgeries. Both seem amazing from consultations I've heard. To be honest though, dealing with a rude patient is probably better experience than watching surgery!

    I was like you before I started! Very anxious. Actually the first week was induction which was very boring and often not relevant to outpatients. There were some valuable sessions but it was still quite dull. Almost all induction sessions you do are with non-clinical staff too though so you get to meet other people. I met someone who works with lab specimens and had lots of interesting stories to tell! When actually working on the ward for the first time, as Ameelia said, you are shadowing for a good amount of time. Mine was quite informal so I got to get hands-on quite early but you're always with someone more senior which is great. I was then slowly allowed to do things on my own (blood pressure etc) and it's a scary but incredible moment when you realise a doctor has decided to treat/discharge someone based on a measurement/test you made!

    Everyone was really friendly with me and I've never had someone become upset because I asked them a question. I would carry around a notebook though to write down the answers they give (phone numbers etc.)
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    been told Cardiff are sending no more offers so I'm joining here
    applied to Leeds, Sheff, Liverpool and Cardiff. Interviews at Liverpool and Cardiff, but they were both rubbish.
    disappointed, but I never even expected 2 interviews so yuno. hoping for better next year (and a better UKCAT!)
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    Hey guys think ill be joining you, i got four rejections this year (it was my first time applying) which i think was mainly due to having restricted choices because of my lowish UKCAT (620). Im already on gap year with achieved grades, although im not too keen on taking another year out because ill be another year older for university, i think medicine will be worth it though. However ive decided that I am only taking a second year out if I get a good UKCAT otherwise it will be pretty pointless for me. Ill probably then take my backup but Im trying to avoid GEM at all costs :P
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    Hello, do anyone know what the deal is with re-applying to a medical school you applied to and were rejected pre-interview? I would like to reapply to BSMS, but not sure what their policy is. Is it a case of contacting the schools independently(i.e. by email) or is this information hidden away on their website? Or does anyone know off the top of their head. Thanks x
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    (Original post by ameelia22)
    Is it literally 5 vacancies in total, or just 5 HCA posts?
    Either way...where an earth in the country do you live thats so desolate?!
    5 vacancies total! How many vacancies are in your area? I've signed up for notification of vacancies for the last month or so and have only received three notifications since for HCA posts. I just assumed that was the 'normal' number of vacancies available aha. I'm in Dorset, can't exactly say that it's 'desolate', there are plenty of hospitals around!
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    I applied for medicine this year and got 4 rejections without interview!!
    Should i reapply and take a gap year?
    should i just go to a european uni to study medicine like in Prague?
    OR
    Should i start my back up and start pharmacy?

    i dont know. im so confused! Some advise please
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    (Original post by ameelia22)
    x
    Yeah just email back if you've got any questions, they're usually really good at all that stuff. All of it is relatively simple, i mean it is an entry-level job so nothing is going to be too complex, so just keep level headed and think common sense. I recommend you call/email and ask though.

    You'll get enough money, the NHS pay is surprisingly good, so don't worry about money at all. For me, money was like the icing on the cake, so not too important. As for surgery, yeah it entirely depends on where you work and the hospital policies/the nurses and how nice they are. I'm not saying you won't see any, but you'll have to really push.

    Don't worry, they have to train everyone up to the standard they deem acceptable. You'll usually have an induction week, and then 2-3 days specialist training for your role. Even after that you may have a week's supernumerary where you work with another HCA. you'll be fine.



    (Original post by Conscientious)
    x
    It will probably be on their website, most usually don't mind, some would rather you not if it was POST-interview, so as your's is pre, I don't think it should matter if you do or don't. I'd either email admissions or have a thorough check on their website though. The information is usually on medical schools websites
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    Just thought I'd pop in and say hi to my fellow re-applicants! :hello:
    Obviously I was gutted to get rejected but it's amazing how well chocolate deals with all that...

    Other than feeling quite a bit heavier, I'm feeling pretty optimistic about this year
 
 
 
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