Join TSR now and chat about whatever you’re intoSign up now

How to get into DJing? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hey guys, wasn't sure where to post so sorry if in wrong section.

    Basically I've had an interest in DJing for years and years, and it's always something I've wanted to try. I'm trained to a highish level as a drummer and I feel that timing, matching, mixing, comes pretty natural with that, from previous experience. I love clubbing and I'd love to someday have a go at DJing myself.

    I really don't know how to get started though at all.

    Does anyone have any general advice or idea on where to look to for beginners? There's so much stuff on the web but I'm not really sure where to look. Or any personal experience advice?

    I have loads of questions, but the two key fundamental I'm just not getting are;
    At home, making demos and mixes; is that just using software on pc/mac? Loads of people seem to be doing it nowadays, but I'm at a loss where to start, especially as so much in terms of software/etc seems to be on offer.
    And say you were going to play live in a club for instance, what equipment do you need (at a basic level)? Do you need all the speakers etc too?

    Any help would be really, really appreciated, thank you
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    The Traktor software for your computer is apparently really good Pretty expensive though
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Im sorry but the admins here just deleted 50% of my reply, it had more info. Well that sucks, thanks for that admins.
    What the hell is the point in there being a function to place links in a post when half the post and the links get deleted.

    You understand 4/4 principle so yes, you will make a good DJ, it's all in matching the phrases (32 beat sections) of the new song with the one already playing....and maybe keeping songs in a compatible key to avoid sound clashes or to get the best sounding mixes.

    Recording your mixes can be done on your PC with whatever software you use (eg virtual DJ to get started, very easy to use and loads of features, dont let people bad mouth it, they obviously havent used it, you can use it for free to get started, and if you enjoy it, buy a cheap MP3 controller to go with it for a more hands on experience with knobs and buttons. But your PC keyboard can be mapped as a midi controller for unlimited functions so this too is very hands on)

    Most clubs or "club nights" will have the equipment already, the promoter and organiser will sort all this out, you just turn up and play for them usually. At a stage when you want to put your own nights on, you will need decks, speakers and amps, but this is a long way down the line

    All the best.



    (Original post by fnm)
    Hey guys, wasn't sure where to post so sorry if in wrong section.

    Basically I've had an interest in DJing for years and years, and it's always something I've wanted to try. I'm trained to a highish level as a drummer and I feel that timing, matching, mixing, comes pretty natural with that, from previous experience. I love clubbing and I'd love to someday have a go at DJing myself.

    I really don't know how to get started though at all.

    Does anyone have any general advice or idea on where to look to for beginners? There's so much stuff on the web but I'm not really sure where to look. Or any personal experience advice?

    I have loads of questions, but the two key fundamental I'm just not getting are;
    At home, making demos and mixes; is that just using software on pc/mac? Loads of people seem to be doing it nowadays, but I'm at a loss where to start, especially as so much in terms of software/etc seems to be on offer.
    And say you were going to play live in a club for instance, what equipment do you need (at a basic level)? Do you need all the speakers etc too?

    Any help would be really, really appreciated, thank you
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Download Virtual DJ Home (it's free).

    Get a feel for beat-matching songs, how effects work etc. Just play around, see what you come up with.

    Then, once you've done that, buy yourself a Numark Mixtrack Pro II. Cost about £150, and is the perfect controller for a beginner looking to improve. It's mapped to Virtual DJ so you can use it with that.

    Just practice and test things out. Only you can hear it, so it doesn't matter if it sounds rubbish, you can change it.

    I've been DJing for just over a year now, and after aboit 6 months of just trying stuff out by myself, Recording it and listening back to see what I can improve. Then I did some mates parties and it went down a treat. Then managed to get myself a slot one night at a club in town.

    The thrill is incredible.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Would really like to dissuade you from listening to the previous posts.

    If you actually want to be a good, respected DJ that plays in clubs, decent parties, etc. don't buy something like the mixtrack pro which has a "sync" button.

    The type of DJing these guys are referring to is laptop DJing and 95% of these "laptop DJs" cannot beatmatch using their ears, they need to rely on the sync button and visual waveforms to keep their tracks in time, AKA beatmatched.

    The sync button matches the BPM (I'm sure you know what this is) of a track to the one that is already playing and then you can literally see the waveforms (visual patterns that represent the music) and use move the platter to get the tracks in time.

    This is all well and good if you only want to be a bedroom DJ and admittedly it is a cheap alternative to buying CDJs, and a route that I started with, but after about a year of using a controller with a sync button I realised that this was not really DJing properly. You look at the biggest DJs in the music scene and they will be using CDJs, WITHOUT a sync button.

    The reality is that if you learn to DJ on a controller, when you are asked to play at a proper venue with a CDJ setup (which is what clubs use nowadays) you won't have a clue because there ain't no sync button on CDJs and you would look like a muppet with your tunes clanging all over the place.

    I know I'm just some random guy on the internet, but please take my advice and get some CDJs, it will undoubtedly pay off in the long term.

    Another option is to buy a cheap controller like the Numark Mixtrack Pro, which I have owned myself (it is fisher price business, cheap and plasticy) and actually learn to beatmatch without relying on the sync button or waveforms.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by fnm)
    Hey guys, wasn't sure where to post so sorry if in wrong section.

    Basically I've had an interest in DJing for years and years, and it's always something I've wanted to try. I'm trained to a highish level as a drummer and I feel that timing, matching, mixing, comes pretty natural with that, from previous experience. I love clubbing and I'd love to someday have a go at DJing myself.

    I really don't know how to get started though at all.

    Does anyone have any general advice or idea on where to look to for beginners? There's so much stuff on the web but I'm not really sure where to look. Or any personal experience advice?

    I have loads of questions, but the two key fundamental I'm just not getting are;
    At home, making demos and mixes; is that just using software on pc/mac? Loads of people seem to be doing it nowadays, but I'm at a loss where to start, especially as so much in terms of software/etc seems to be on offer.
    And say you were going to play live in a club for instance, what equipment do you need (at a basic level)? Do you need all the speakers etc too?

    Any help would be really, really appreciated, thank you
    You need to find a genre or a number of genres that you are really into, in my opinion the music is more important than the actual DJing, you can be technically good rah rah but if you're tunes are rubbish or you're not feeling them yourself you're not going to want to continue.

    I started out on virtual dj and I think thats the best option for a beginner as its free and you can learn about bars and phrases. Then once your sure you wanna go ahead with djing you need to get yourself some Technics 1210 vinyl turntables or Pioneer CDJ's and learn to beatmatch and mix from then on. You can use a combination of software as well, like I now use Traktor alongside my CDJ's so I can play tunes straight from my computer.

    Clubs will have either vinyl or cd decks and I think this is the right road to pursue, I wouldn't use any controller for your mixing, they don't seem to be very solid and often they have sync buttons which is a no-go for any self-respecting DJ.

    Get yourself some decent headphones like Sennheiser, Audio Technica etc. and some decent speakers / monitors too.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by FightForTruth)
    Would really like to dissuade you from listening to the previous posts.

    If you actually want to be a good, respected DJ that plays in clubs, decent parties, etc. don't buy something like the mixtrack pro which has a "sync" button.

    The type of DJing these guys are referring to is laptop DJing and 95% of these "laptop DJs" cannot beatmatch using their ears, they need to rely on the sync button and visual waveforms to keep their tracks in time, AKA beatmatched.

    The sync button matches the BPM (I'm sure you know what this is) of a track to the one that is already playing and then you can literally see the waveforms (visual patterns that represent the music) and use move the platter to get the tracks in time.

    This is all well and good if you only want to be a bedroom DJ and admittedly it is a cheap alternative to buying CDJs, and a route that I started with, but after about a year of using a controller with a sync button I realised that this was not really DJing properly. You look at the biggest DJs in the music scene and they will be using CDJs, WITHOUT a sync button.

    The reality is that if you learn to DJ on a controller, when you are asked to play at a proper venue with a CDJ setup (which is what clubs use nowadays) you won't have a clue because there ain't no sync button on CDJs and you would look like a muppet with your tunes clanging all over the place.

    I know I'm just some random guy on the internet, but please take my advice and get some CDJs, it will undoubtedly pay off in the long term.

    Another option is to buy a cheap controller like the Numark Mixtrack Pro, which I have owned myself (it is fisher price business, cheap and plasticy) and actually learn to beatmatch without relying on the sync button or waveforms.
    This!

    Only thing I would say is that understandably a decent set up is expensive, I'm on about a grand maybe more for what I've got at the moment, so maybe get something more affordable to begin with.

    And the top 2000 Nexus' now have a sync mate, lol but if you press that button you will die a horrible death.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Get your name out on soundcloud, don't dj with **** high quality, buy all your music! Make sure you keep your sound noticeable, it doesn't really work if you're mixing between genres. Traktor is a good way to start, get some usb decks and practise practise practise, purposely **** up and go out of sync and see how fast you can sort it out
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Friends who DJ have their own CDJs and mixers (apparently Pioneer are the best).

    If your uni has a radio station, then I would suggest going on there once you have enough practice in your bedroom. Then try and get yourself a club night off the back of the radio show

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Origami Bullets)
    Friends who DJ have their own CDJs and mixers (apparently Pioneer are the best).

    If your uni has a radio station, then I would suggest going on there once you have enough practice in your bedroom. Then try and get yourself a club night off the back of the radio show

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    And for mixers Allen & Heath are probably the best
 
 
 
Poll
If you won £30,000, which of these would you spend it on?
Useful resources

Articles:

TSR wiki music section

Quick link:

Unanswered music threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.