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    So I am going to write a persuasive essay on sexism in UK. I would like to know your opinion on whether you agree that sexism still exist in UK or not and please explain why? Thank You .
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    Most definitely, particularly within the church. I don't know much about the role of women nationwide in the church but as a member of a very new female choir in the church of England for four years I experienced sexism.
    The congregation don't go when we sing and we do far fewer services than the boys.
    I recently left the choir due to sexism. I was discriminated against by the man who runs the choir and the vicar.
    I also think that my mother has been passed up for promotions due to being seen as primarily a mother with no career aspirations.


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    Have you heard of the everyday sexism project? http://www.everydaysexism.com/

    It's not limited to the UK, but I know a lot of the submissions are from UK women. That's just one example (also it's from a female point of view, there are lots of instances where men also suffer from sexism too which I'm sure you could look into)
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    Of course sexism still exists.
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    You might want to refine the question. Of course sexism still exists in the UK. There's no doubt about it whatsoever. If anyone were to disagree I'd seriously question their intelligence and direct them to the nearest newspaper.
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    (Original post by AvocatDuDiable)
    You might want to refine the question. Of course sexism still exists in the UK. There's no doubt about it whatsoever. If anyone were to disagree I'd seriously question their intelligence and direct them to the nearest newspaper.
    Wait til jreid1994 or truffle_girl get here, they can argue about how sexism is just feminist propaganda except for when men are the victims of it until the cows come home :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by edithwashere)
    Wait til jreid1994 or truffle_girl get here, they can argue about how sexism is just feminist propaganda except for when men are the victims of it until the cows come home :rolleyes:
    I would seriously question their intelligence and direct them to the nearest newspaper.
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    Yes, but sexism as in "BE GONE WOMAN" isnt around anymore.

    Alot more of sexism is more subconscious today, for instance how you view teachers.

    7th and 8th paragraph down, read it.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...y-physics.html
    Ironicly found this in a TSR post about how we should stop demanding 50/50 ratio m/f.
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    Exists for both men and women.
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    Yes sexism towards both women and men is still happening in the UK, women face the brunt of it of course, but there are various men's issues that you could discuss in order to make your essay more balanced.
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    I think a good answer would consider both sides of the argument, but of course, as a persuasive piece, try to discredit one of them.

    I think feminism has helped move society closer to gender equality, which can be seen in legislation changes such as the Sex Discrimination Act, Equal Pay etc. BUT we still have a long way to go. Double standards still exist, for example - you could look at differences in age discrimination in TV.
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    Of course it exists, and it will continue for as long as men generally find women attractive and women generally find women attractive. It isn't as bad as some like to make out though, think of it like Bob Crow convincing the train drivers that their working conditions are bad enough (£50k p/a) to go on strike over - making people believe there's a problem and getting paid to 'fix it' can be a very effective way to earn a living.
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    (Original post by Ultimate1)
    Exists for both men and women.
    Lets start for women: in some of the job market it true especially in physics/maths and engineering which I find wrong women should not be put off their dream careers by bigots.

    women definitely face more sexual violence than men, statistics show this
    and women weren't allowed on the battle field up until very recently, pretty patronising to women really.
    less women than men in parliament and Chair positions.


    For men: men face prejudices going into nursing, primary teaching(pedophile hysteria by women), men get put off of these careers for this exact reason.

    and women have complete control over reproduction( which is fair it's her body, her life!) but still make men pay for the child he didn't want so men have no choices over becoming a parent although it's well known condoms are far less effective than the pill, (sexist because it's his life! )

    forced envelopment doesn't count as rape or sexual violence to men, as under UK law rape is an act of penetration with a phallus (penis)

    men usually make up the majority of victims of almost every single crime except sexual violence and D.V(although men do make up a lot of victims of dv not as many as women)

    Both sides of the pond are fun.

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    (Original post by Hopple)
    Of course it exists, and it will continue for as long as men generally find women attractive and women generally find women attractive. It isn't as bad as some like to make out though, think of it like Bob Crow convincing the train drivers that their working conditions are bad enough (£50k p/a) to go on strike over - making people believe there's a problem and getting paid to 'fix it' can be a very effective way to earn a living.
    What do you think about this article?


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-20223264
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    (Original post by koolkate)
    What do you think about this article?


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-20223264
    If you take into account the time most women take off work to look after kids, as well as other career breaks, lower likelihood to put themselves forwards for promotion, it makes sense why women are paid less, even for doing the same job because they i) have a different contract with regards to parental leave (and are more likely to disappear for longer), ii) are less likely to move on so don't demand as big a salary to stay and iii) are more likely to have had gaps in their experience (doing a job for a year then moving to a similar job is more desirable than doing a job for a year but with a 6 month break in the middle).

    Or looking at it from another angle, if women were as capable and reliable as men yet were willing to work for 10 to 15% less, why would anyone hire men? Sure, some might be sexist, but to be sexist to that extent is business suicide.
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    (Original post by Hopple)
    If you take into account the time most women take off work to look after kids, as well as other career breaks, lower likelihood to put themselves forwards for promotion, it makes sense why women are paid less, even for doing the same job because they i) have a different contract with regards to parental leave (and are more likely to disappear for longer), ii) are less likely to move on so don't demand as big a salary to stay and iii) are more likely to have had gaps in their experience (doing a job for a year then moving to a similar job is more desirable than doing a job for a year but with a 6 month break in the middle).

    Or looking at it from another angle, if women were as capable and reliable as men yet were willing to work for 10 to 15% less, why would anyone hire men? Sure, some might be sexist, but to be sexist to that extent is business suicide.
    I don't think they are willing to work for less money (they are not some illegal immigrants), they have to.
    Anyways I can use this as an argument against my topic thanks.
    Btw what do you think about women in politics?
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    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-12771938

    What do you think about this?
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    It might also be worth commenting on the difference between sexism and political correctness - turn to the world of comedy for examples.
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    (Original post by koolkate)
    I can use this as an argument against my topic thanks.
    What do you think about women in politics?
    I think it's important that women can reach and be seen to reach the top (so Thatcher is proof of that, maybe Theresa May too ) and be heavily involved in major decisions, but they ought to get there on merit and not through some quota which would both exclude worthy men and open up the suspicion on all (?) women MPs that they aren't really capable. You've got Caroline Lucas as the first Green Party MP, and her successor as leader is female though I haven't heard much of her so far.

    There are some bad eggs though (as is true for male politicians too, of course), Harman shouldn't have been let near anything that affected men and women differently, for example, her being female allowed her to say and do things about and to men that a man wouldn't have been able to do/say to/about women, so that could well have diminished the respectability of women MPs in general in some people's eyes (as in, a woman can have a sexist agenda and be kept on the front bench of a major political party).
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    (Original post by Hopple)
    I think it's important that women can reach and be seen to reach the top (so Thatcher is proof of that, maybe Theresa May too ) and be heavily involved in major decisions, but they ought to get there on merit and not through some quota which would both exclude worthy men and open up the suspicion on all (?) women MPs that they aren't really capable. You've got Caroline Lucas as the first Green Party MP, and her successor as leader is female though I haven't heard much of her so far.

    There are some bad eggs though (as is true for male politicians too, of course), Harman shouldn't have been let near anything that affected men and women differently, for example, her being female allowed her to say and do things about and to men that a man wouldn't have been able to do/say to/about women, so that could well have diminished the respectability of women MPs in general in some people's eyes (as in, a woman can have a sexist agenda and be kept on the front bench of a major political party).
    Don't forget all the male bad eggs in politics too - Harman is by no means faultless, but I think there are a lot of sexist men in there, particularly amongst the Tory backbenchers.
 
 
 
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