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    (Original post by Bloxorus)
    I dont think it will disadvantage you too badly as economics at undergrad level is very different from A level, if it was that important to have an A then surely it would be compulsory to take it at A level?
    I recon as long as you have an A in maths AS and high predictions you should still have just as good of a shot as if it was in any other subject...
    Great Thank you! Yeah I got an A in maths AS and A in F.Maths AS
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    Guys I'm really stuck on my 5th choice...

    I have 1A*, 5As, 5Bs, 1C at GCSE.

    AAAAA at AS in Maths (88%), Further maths (93%), Economics (80%), Physics (83%) and General Studies (85%). The average of my best 3 subjects (including further maths but excluding general studies) is 88%, excluding further maths its a lot lower.

    Noteworthy extracurricular activities: I swim at national level (not sure if this will help at all but can't hurt to include on my PS).

    Currently thinking of applying to: UCL, Bristol, Nottingham and Bath.


    I was considering Cambridge as a choice but i've had mixed responses to that with some people saying it would be an instant rejection with my UMS but others are saying id get an interview so still undecided. LSE, Oxford and Warwick are GCSE whores so my chances are over for those 3.
    I was thinking about Exeter however they do BA Economics and I'm not sure if that makes much difference but I want as much maths/quantitative economics on the course as possible.
    I don't really want to live in Scotland so I'm not considering St Andrews or Edinburgh.

    Can anyone help me out here?
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    (Original post by Bloxorus)
    Guys I'm really stuck on my 5th choice...

    I have 1A*, 5As, 5Bs, 1C at GCSE.

    AAAAA at AS in Maths (88%), Further maths (93%), Economics (80%), Physics (83%) and General Studies (85%). The average of my best 3 subjects (including further maths but excluding general studies) is 88%, excluding further maths its a lot lower.

    Noteworthy extracurricular activities: I swim at national level (not sure if this will help at all but can't hurt to include on my PS).

    Currently thinking of applying to: UCL, Bristol, Nottingham and Bath.


    I was considering Cambridge as a choice but i've had mixed responses to that with some people saying it would be an instant rejection with my UMS but others are saying id get an interview so still undecided. LSE, Oxford and Warwick are GCSE whores so my chances are over for those 3.
    I was thinking about Exeter however they do BA Economics and I'm not sure if that makes much difference but I want as much maths/quantitative economics on the course as possible.
    I don't really want to live in Scotland so I'm not considering St Andrews or Edinburgh.

    Can anyone help me out here?
    You have one spot and don't know what to pick so my advice would be to try and apply to Cambridge, because nobody can give you a definite answer other than Cambridge if you'd get an interview or not so I'd apply just so you know that you did try.
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    (Original post by Bloxorus)
    Guys I'm really stuck on my 5th choice...

    I have 1A*, 5As, 5Bs, 1C at GCSE.

    AAAAA at AS in Maths (88%), Further maths (93%), Economics (80%), Physics (83%) and General Studies (85%). The average of my best 3 subjects (including further maths but excluding general studies) is 88%, excluding further maths its a lot lower.

    Noteworthy extracurricular activities: I swim at national level (not sure if this will help at all but can't hurt to include on my PS).

    Currently thinking of applying to: UCL, Bristol, Nottingham and Bath.


    I was considering Cambridge as a choice but i've had mixed responses to that with some people saying it would be an instant rejection with my UMS but others are saying id get an interview so still undecided. LSE, Oxford and Warwick are GCSE whores so my chances are over for those 3.
    I was thinking about Exeter however they do BA Economics and I'm not sure if that makes much difference but I want as much maths/quantitative economics on the course as possible.
    I don't really want to live in Scotland so I'm not considering St Andrews or Edinburgh.

    Can anyone help me out here?
    Have you looked into York?
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    (Original post by NedStark)
    Have you looked into York?
    I was thinking about York, I guess it would be a 'safe bet' for an insurance however im not sure whether I would actually be happy going there or not. I want to go into IB so ideally I want to go to a target or semi-target and I wouldn't have thought York would be one. But yeah if all else fails I would probably apply there.

    Do you know much about the difference between BSc and BA Economics and whether it would be far different at somewhere like Exeter or Durham to a BSc degree?
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    (Original post by Bloxorus)
    I was thinking about York, I guess it would be a 'safe bet' for an insurance however im not sure whether I would actually be happy going there or not. I want to go into IB so ideally I want to go to a target or semi-target and I wouldn't have thought York would be one. But yeah if all else fails I would probably apply there.

    Do you know much about the difference between BSc and BA Economics and whether it would be far different at somewhere like Exeter or Durham to a BSc degree?
    BA is less mathematical, more traditional. I suppose employers would prefer the BSc, especially in finance of any sort.
    However sometimes the type does not represent the content.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    I achieved a high C for AS Maths and am continuing it until A2 level, with a hope to get a B overall.

    I really enjoy economics, and would like to pursue a degree in the subject. Ideally, I would like an economics degree with the least maths content as I don't want to get too 'bogged down'.

    I've looked at modules at Sheffield Uni (AAB) and they all look very similar. Would there be more maths in a financial economics degree than straight? I'm quite interested in both fields, so I don't mind which one. I'm assuming that Business Economics is a weaker degree?
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    (Original post by Alex-Torres)
    I achieved a high C for AS Maths and am continuing it until A2 level, with a hope to get a B overall.

    I really enjoy economics, and would like to pursue a degree in the subject. Ideally, I would like an economics degree with the least maths content as I don't want to get too 'bogged down'.

    I've looked at modules at Sheffield Uni (AAB) and they all look very similar. Would there be more maths in a financial economics degree than straight? I'm quite interested in both fields, so I don't mind which one. I'm assuming that Business Economics is a weaker degree?
    I'm guessing (emphasis on the word guessing) that financial economics would probably be quite maths heavy, seeing how essential maths is to finance in general.

    If you aren't confident with maths, why not choose something related to economics but less maths-heavy - like Economics and Politics, or Land Economy?
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    (Original post by keith111)
    I know its early but the same thread for 2013 was made in march last year. Post what grades you think you're going to get get and what universities your are currently considering.

    I am currently looking at UCL ,Nottingham or Bath and am hoping to get A*AA at A2 with AAAB being achieved at AS. I think LSE Oxford and Cambridge are a bit out of my reach
    LSE may be a long shot, depends how good your UMS is in your A's. UCL is a good choice, but also tough. Nottingham and Bath are nice, but your PS means a lot for Econ, as there are no interviews except for Oxbridge- so it's more than just the predictions.
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    (Original post by Alex-Torres)
    I achieved a high C for AS Maths and am continuing it until A2 level, with a hope to get a B overall.

    I really enjoy economics, and would like to pursue a degree in the subject. Ideally, I would like an economics degree with the least maths content as I don't want to get too 'bogged down'.

    I've looked at modules at Sheffield Uni (AAB) and they all look very similar. Would there be more maths in a financial economics degree than straight? I'm quite interested in both fields, so I don't mind which one. I'm assuming that Business Economics is a weaker degree?
    The degrees will be very similar, but it financial econ will probably need more maths. but you really shouldn't struggle, because as far as i'm aware, maths isn't compulsory at Sheffield. You can choose more modules with less focus on econometrics as well if you like.
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    (Original post by Alex-Torres)
    I achieved a high C for AS Maths and am continuing it until A2 level, with a hope to get a B overall.

    I really enjoy economics, and would like to pursue a degree in the subject. Ideally, I would like an economics degree with the least maths content as I don't want to get too 'bogged down'.

    I've looked at modules at Sheffield Uni (AAB) and they all look very similar. Would there be more maths in a financial economics degree than straight? I'm quite interested in both fields, so I don't mind which one. I'm assuming that Business Economics is a weaker degree?
    Applying for joint honours (like Geo and econ, or econ and politics) may be a good idea. Won't be much compulsory maths
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    Re-applying/ Re-sitting

    GCSEs; 6A*s 4As 1B
    IGCSE; 1A

    A levels; A [Chem] A [Hist] B [re-sitting B in Maths]
    AS levels; aaa [Bio, Crit, GenStuds]
    Also doing Further Maths and Econ AS

    Applying to:

    LSE- AAB Econ and Econ History
    UCL [maybe]- A*[Maths]AA Econ
    Durham- A*AA Econ
    Leeds- AAA Econ
    Newc- AAA-AAB Econ

    Last year got offers but didn't meet them. Sucks. Waiting on Unis for how much of a disadvantage i will be at, seeing as i'm resitting
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    (Original post by ayooshc)
    The degrees will be very similar, but it financial econ will probably need more maths. but you really shouldn't struggle, because as far as i'm aware, maths isn't compulsory at Sheffield. You can choose more modules with less focus on econometrics as well if you like.
    (Original post by tooambitious)
    Applying for joint honours (like Geo and econ, or econ and politics) may be a good idea. Won't be much compulsory maths
    (Original post by Giant)
    I'm guessing (emphasis on the word guessing) that financial economics would probably be quite maths heavy, seeing how essential maths is to finance in general.

    If you aren't confident with maths, why not choose something related to economics but less maths-heavy - like Economics and Politics, or Land Economy?
    I think I'll be orite with the maths, I was just thinking one might be less mathematical but equally respected by employers. I'm going to do Economics and Management I think. I hated Statistics 1, but loved the core modules at AS, is econ at uni like stats?
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    (Original post by Alex-Torres)
    I think I'll be orite with the maths, I was just thinking one might be less mathematical but equally respected by employers. I'm going to do Economics and Management I think. I hated Statistics 1, but loved the core modules at AS, is econ at uni like stats?
    finance would probably be more mathy, and i don't think it'll be like S1, it's a different level, and more applied, so much more interesting. also there might be more core maths- things like integrals and differential equations, stuff from core3 and core4 is likely to be used, and it's different obviously to a-level because everything you do as an ends- i.e. you use a certain method to work out profit margins or something.
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    Does anyone know if UCL ask everyone for UMS? I've done a bit of looking on the TSR and UCL website and I can't get a definite answer (some say they don't ask all Economics applicants for UMS, some say the ask all applicants).

    If they do ask for UMS, are there any statistics available in regards to UMS scores that successful applicants typically have?

    university.which.co.uk says that roughly 30% of people applying to UCL get offers, so I'm guessing that the average successful UMS score would be in the high 80's, but any proper information would be appreciated!
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    (Original post by robin1125)
    Does anyone know if UCL ask everyone for UMS? I've done a bit of looking on the TSR and UCL website and I can't get a definite answer (some say they don't ask all Economics applicants for UMS, some say the ask all applicants).

    If they do ask for UMS, are there any statistics available in regards to UMS scores that successful applicants typically have?

    university.which.co.uk says that roughly 30% of people applying to UCL get offers, so I'm guessing that the average successful UMS score would be in the high 80's, but any proper information would be appreciated!
    hey there, i got an offer, but wasn't asked for UMS. They do, however ask some candidates. I'm not sure what their policy is as to who they ask, you can ask i guess.
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    (Original post by ayooshc)
    hey there, i got an offer, but wasn't asked for UMS. They do, however ask some candidates. I'm not sure what their policy is as to who they ask, you can ask i guess.
    Yeah, I saw it mentioned on the old stalking page and was confused since a guy in the year above me got an offer without being asked for UMS too.

    Did you have really good GCSE's or A2 predictions? I figured that could be a reason (but even then the guy I know who had an offer didn't have exceptional grades)
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    (Original post by robin1125)
    Yeah, I saw it mentioned on the old stalking page and was confused since a guy in the year above me got an offer without being asked for UMS too.

    Did you have really good GCSE's or A2 predictions? I figured that could be a reason (but even then the guy I know who had an offer didn't have exceptional grades)
    GCSEs weren't what UCL would call amazing, even though i was relatively pleased at the time. 6A* 3A 1B and an A at IGCSE

    A2 Predictions were A*A*A in Maths, Hist and Chem. b at AS bio. Self studied AS Further Maths. PS was strong.
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    I'm looking for a book about maths in economics. Should be relatively new, interesting ton read and not too long. Any suggestions?
    • PS Helper
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    (Original post by robin1125)
    Does anyone know if UCL ask everyone for UMS? I've done a bit of looking on the TSR and UCL website and I can't get a definite answer (some say they don't ask all Economics applicants for UMS, some say the ask all applicants).

    If they do ask for UMS, are there any statistics available in regards to UMS scores that successful applicants typically have?

    university.which.co.uk says that roughly 30% of people applying to UCL get offers, so I'm guessing that the average successful UMS score would be in the high 80's, but any proper information would be appreciated!
    If they do I don't think they ask all applicants, I think most people who received UCL offers last year didn't get asked about their UMS. In fact I can't think of anyone who did get asked. You just get invited to one of their compulsory open day visits- no interviews or additional forms.
 
 
 
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