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Greatest Human in the History of History Watch

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    Jenner, Lister, Fleming and Tesla for me.
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    Fleming should be mentioned absolutely. He was the discoverer of penicillin, the first antibiotic, if I'm not mistaken. I agree with you.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    Fleming should be mentioned absolutely. He was the discoverer of penicillin, the first antibiotic, if I'm not mistaken. I agree with you.
    Fleming discovered it but I was Australian scientists Florey and Chain who developed it and made it for mass production in WW2. Without them millions more would have died. They deserve a little mention I think.


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    Stanislav Petrov
    Vasili Arkhipov

    Because they allegedly saved
    the world on 2 separate occasions.
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    (Original post by The Socktor)
    Does it matter if you succeed? I mean, yeah, if it jepodises one's ability for the progression to occur at all I can understand, however, I don't think that would have been the case, and even if it were, that doesn't excuse them for continuing to support the atrocity personally.
    Yes, it does matter. Oskar Schindler saved the lives of 1,200 Jews during the Holocaust by employing them in his factory, yet he dared not be too outspoken about the other six million. If he had been, he would have been arrested himself and the 1,200 lives saved would simply have been lost again.

    To the Jews he saved I'm sure they considered what he did to be far preferable to the actions of someone else in a similar situation who might have been more ambitious and ended up getting everyone killed.

    I wouldn't consider our society to be entirely equal. We are getting there, but still.
    Mostly equal then. Certainly much better than in the past.


    And was therefore a ****. Even if it were that the reason he didn't speak out against it was because he was afraid of the repercussions, that still doesn't excuse him for owning slaves himself.
    He treated his slaves well and freed them in his will. He set a better example than most of his peers, and if southern slave-owners had followed that example then maybe there wouldn't have been so much debate 60 years later.

    Okay. Now let's imagine you had a time machine and you went back in time to meet them. Call me crazy, but I don't think most people would be too happy discussing politics with a slave owner or an extreme racist. You might still enjoy talking to them about other stuff and perhaps even praise them for it, however I don't know about you but the moment they brought up support for slavery and racial segregation would the moment my capacity to listen to them would end.
    If a politician in a slave-owning country offered a compromise - he would allow it to continue, but he would also have a bill of slave's rights enacted in law - would you accept? If you did then there'd be lots of slaves who are well treated, but slaves nonetheless. If you didn't, but instead demanded that he abolish slavery altogether, you'd be laughed out of the house. There would still be lots of slaves, but because of your vocal opposition to compromise most of them would be very badly treated indeed.

    But the fact is they at least tried, and THAT is what makes a person great - not pandering to social convention.
    We clearly have different definitions of "great". Often it's better to succeed at making several small improvements than to fail to make one big one.

    Anyone who tries to force people to do anything that's a long way from what's accepted by society is almost certain to fail. That's why it's better to first change what's accepted, and only then to change what people do about it. It may take longer, but it's far more likely to produce a good outcome for everyone affected.
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    In terms of religion I would name Martin Luther who was the founder of protestants. In my opinion he must belong to the short list. Don't forget to mention Johannes Gutenberg, the inventor of letterpress.
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    I don't know about best, but Alexander the Great is certainly my favourite.
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    There is a physicist who must be mention: Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, the discoverer of x-Rays! when I read the names which come in my mind, I realize that many Germans or people with German sounding names had made important contributions for society what make me proud!^^
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    Lenin or Jesus


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    (Original post by Siesta)
    Lenin or Jesus


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    Why Lenin?


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    Not sure if anyone has said this but I find myself drawn towards Julius Ceaser.
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    (Original post by Siesta)
    Lenin or Jesus


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    I was thinking these two also before I decided on Julius Ceaser!
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    Whoever that early hominid was that first manipulated fire.

    We'd all still be living in the stone age if it wasn't for that guy/girl.

    Recorded history? There are too many to choose from. From a European perspective, Julius Cesar is up there. In Asia and Eastern Europe, Alexander the Great stands above all others.
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    (Original post by LewisG123)
    Why Lenin?


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    He basically brought Communist/Marxist principles into action for the first time...the Cold War, first nuclear attack, Red Scare, and the current state of most Far East nations etc would not have occurred without him.


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    (Original post by cl_steele)
    It's all very well to judge a dead man isn't it. What you're forgetting is it was quite the norm back then and perfectly acceptable to think like that, many would probably call you a filthy frothing socialist back then to boot... The fact that you'd slander the man who helped save the empire in its darkest day when he's dead is quite pathetic really. Respect the dead, especially those who without you almost certainly wouldn't be alive. And besides his beliefs weren't even especially bad for the age.
    I'm sorry, but the qualification that it was the 'norm' allegedly doesn't hold too much stock with me.

    I'm not a massive Churchill fan; he was a good war-time leader but there's a reason he lost the subsequent general election, and the actions of his predecessor Atlee were arguably equal to that of Churchill in terms of rebuilding after the war and helping to create a fairer society.

    The people I owe my life to are the millions of people of various nationalities who fought against evil and those who died doing so, they deserve more adoration than one man.


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    (Original post by Siesta)
    He basically brought Communist/Marxist principles into action for the first time...the Cold War, first nuclear attack, Red Scare, and the current state of most Far East nations etc would not have occurred without him.


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    And do you think it was good that these events came into being? Would it not be better a man/woman appoint to the greatest human in history who made an important contribution for society? or an one who left a cultural heritage?

    If you want to mention a political philosopher, then Karl Marx who has analyzed the system of capitalism well, even if his solutions and thoughts failed in the following times.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    And do you think it was good that these events came into being? Would it not be better a man/woman appoint to the greatest human in history who made an important contribution for society? or an one who left a cultural heritage?

    If you want to mention a political philosopher, then Karl Marx who has analyzed the system of capitalism well, even if his solutions and thoughts failed in the following times.
    No, I'm not saying these events are good. To be 'great' you don't necessarily have to be 'good'. He just shaped the way some countries interact today. Like I said Lenin put Marxist principles into action, Marx was just the theoriser. We've learnt lessons from Lenin that Communism only ever looks good on paper.



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    (Original post by Siesta)
    No, I'm not saying these events are good. To be 'great' you don't necessarily have to be 'good'. He just shaped the way some countries interact today. Like I said Lenin put Marxist principles into action, Marx was just the theoriser. We've learnt lessons from Lenin that Communism only ever looks good on paper.



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    To be defined as the greatest person ever I would say you do have to be a good person and have made a positive impact.

    Lenin was a tyrannical, dishonest murderer who is indirectly responsible for millions of deaths all leading to a failing system. It takes a special kind of f**k up to make the Tsarist system look good, somehow Lenin managed it


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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    If you want to mention a political philosopher, then Karl Marx who has analyzed the system of capitalism well, even if his solutions and thoughts failed in the following times.
    As a side note, regardless of what one thinks of their economic theories, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engles (especially Engles) were also Greater German nationalists and chauvanists who supported the extermination or forced Germanisation or Magyarization of "counter-revolutionary nations" (especially the Slavs of the Austro-Hungarian empire, but others as well), and also supported capitalism, globalisation, Western imperialism and colonialism.
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    It's been said, but Da Vinci. Just because Jesus was (in some senses) more impactful doesn't make him great. Da Vinci made progress.
 
 
 
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