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Is it possible/manageable to work full time whilst also studying full time? Watch

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    Trying to keep my options open and I have heard of it in the past.

    Just wondering if I can get any insight on both working full time and studying full time... at the same time. With the likes of a flexible company in mind such as a leading supermarket or large department store which may be able to fit hours with your study timetable.

    How manageable is it?

    I know some lecturers do it. As in they studying for their PhD (some full time) whilst also lecturing full time.

    I just really don't want to end up in a position like last year where I'm just losing money constantly (more than the student loan is bringing in) and relying on my parents to help me out. Then leading to me leaving university with over £3500 down the drain and only having been there for half a year. -.-
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    Depends at what level, I did it for my A-Levels, I did about 45 hours a week, skipped college and came out with A* A* B, but if you're talking a high level like phd or even undergraduate, then no - do some part time work max 16 hours and concentrate and getting your dream job afterwards
    (Original post by Chrisruptor)
    Trying to keep my options open and I have heard of it in the past.

    Just wondering if I can get any insight on both working full time and studying full time... at the same time. With the likes of a flexible company in mind such as a leading supermarket or large department store which may be able to fit hours with your study timetable.

    How manageable is it?

    I know some lecturers do it. As in they studying for their PhD (some full time) whilst also lecturing full time.

    I just really don't want to end up in a position like last year where I'm just losing money constantly (more than the student loan is bringing in) and relying on my parents to help me out. Then leading to me leaving university with over £3500 down the drain and only having been there for half a year. -.-
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    Some OU students do this - I have done in the past. But that's where the study is flexible and can be fitted around work. I strongly doubt you'll find anywhere that will let you work around your lectures - supermarkets aren't as flexible as you think. Mostly they take on part time staff, and they need people to work the hours that they need. They're not going to struggle to work around your availability when hundreds of other applicants aren't restricted.

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    Good point, I worked for Tesco, and they sucked.
    (Original post by Juno)
    Some OU students do this - I have done in the past. But that's where the study is flexible and can be fitted around work. I strongly doubt you'll find anywhere that will let you work around your lectures - supermarkets aren't as flexible as you think. Mostly they take on part time staff, and they need people to work the hours that they need. They're not going to struggle to work around your availability when hundreds of other applicants aren't restricted.

    Sent from my GT-S5363
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    Possible, yes...it's difficult though. I was doing 24-32 hours a week for a while and found it hard to stay motivated to study. I'd end up in a "work bubble" and I'd just want to sit around and relax after I finished my shift, instead of working on an essay. I know a few friends who work full time hours in bars and their university work has definitely suffered as a result. It's not a problem now I've broken up for Easter (and pretty much summer) but it's very draining during term time.

    As someone else said, supermarkets aren't as flexible as you think. They need staff to work certain hours and if you can't do it, someone else will. They will tell you they're flexible with hours, but most of them will specify the times/days you need to work, such as Friday-Monday 2pm-10pm, for example. If you can't do it, they won't change the contract for you. The best thing to do is specify what days you can work and leave the other days free for studying, instead of telling them you're willing to work every night or whatever. You need to be strict with how you spend your time.
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    I worked 37 hours per week and there was no way I could have studied as well. I was in work from 8am or 9am to 6pm. Then I'd get home by 7pm, cook my tea and eat it which took me up to 8pm and then relaxed for an hour which took me to 9pm. Then I would have only 1 hour before I had to sleep at 10pm in order to get 8 hours (be up at 6am). 1 hour a day is not enough to get any substantial amount of study done. I only had Sunday off and by Sunday I was physically and mentally drained - the last thing I would want to do was study. I burned out just from working full time, so working full time and studying too would have wrecked me. It's not for everyone. Maybe it depends on the type of work too - you might be able to manage doing something full time which is easy going (I can't think of any easy going jobs though) but retail is definitely not going to make things easy on you.
 
 
 
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