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    The new president Xi Jinping and his wife, the first widely-known Chinese first lady, visited Russia and a number of African countries. Along the way, Peng Liyuan, the Chinese First-lady and a famous singer, has been talked a lot by both medias and Chinese people.

    I hope she will help to build a increasingly positive imagine of China in the world.

    Do you know her and do you like her..?
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    My army brothers and i
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    TBH the only thing that would give me a positive view of the Chinese leader is if he or she were elected by the people.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    TBH the only thing that would give me a positive view of the Chinese leader is if he or she were elected by the people.
    What good would an election do? If "democracy" was used in China, it'd quickly turn into a failing Britain, descend into squabbling party politics (where all the parties effectively say the same thing and are only in it for themselves and their own party) and productivity would be greatly reduced and China would be much much less successful than it is now. I guarantee that had "democracy" been used in China in the preceding decades, it would not be the growing powerhouse that it is today.

    "Democracy" is not the be all and end all. It is not necessarily the greatest of systems for a rapidly developing country (as can be seen by numerous African countries).

    As much as I like living in a "democratic" country, that's not to say that the Chinese people, who number well over a billion people, are thirsty for democracy.

    I'm sure democracy will come later with a new and younger and well-traveled generation and when China is much more successful and powerful - right now, a strong and guiding hand is needed.
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    (Original post by HumanSupremacist)
    What good would an election do? If "democracy" was used in China, it'd quickly turn into a failing Britain, descend into squabbling party politics (where all the parties effectively say the same thing and are only in it for themselves and their own party) and productivity would be greatly reduced and China would be much much less successful than it is now. I guarantee that had "democracy" been used in China in the preceding decades, it would not be the growing powerhouse that it is today.

    "Democracy" is not the be all and end all. It is not necessarily the greatest of systems for a rapidly developing country (as can be seen by numerous African countries).

    As much as I like living in a "democratic" country, that's not to say that the Chinese people, who number well over a billion people, are thirsty for democracy.

    I'm sure democracy will come later with a new and younger and well-traveled generation and when China is much more successful and powerful - right now, a strong and guiding hand is needed.
    Quite the contrary, it appears that all over China, people are desperate for democracy now.

    I am always suspicious of arguments along the lines of 'democracy is OK for you old-fashioned and decadent Westerners - but for us thrusting [insert your rapidly developing nation here] people, it simply isn't appropriate just yet'. That's generally the argument of dictators and tyrants.

    I am certain that if the CCP collapsed abruptly, we would see a huge upwelling of desire for democracy in the PRC. In fact, it would become a genuine People's Republic and not one run by a self-appointed elite, which is often deeply corrupt and is very unresponsive to the real needs of its people.
 
 
 
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