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    Liverpool currently subscribes to the PBL approach (this is subject to change in the future pending review). Update: Please note that in October 2013, the decision was made to change the structure and content of the medical curriculum at Liverpool. The changes will take effect for students from the 2014 academic year onwards.

    In essence, PBL will no longer be the mainstay of medical teaching at Liverpool; there will be an increased focus on anatomy, physiology and biochemistry within years 1 and 2. Positive elements of the PBL curriculum have been retained as suggested by students and staff; however, there will be more formalised teaching and support for students. My personal opinion of these changes are very positive and I would describe the new course as an integrated spiral curriculum.

    Entry Requirements

    GCSE

    At GCSE, Liverpool require a Grade ‘C’ minimum in 9 subjects with a minimum ‘B’ in maths, English and Dual Award science.
    Candidates are scored on their GCSEs as such:
    2 points for an ‘A*’ Grade; 2 points for an ‘A’ Grade; 1 point for a ‘B’ Grade.

    The candidate’s best 9 GCSEs are scored. A minimum score of 15/18 is required for interview (more realistically this is a minimum of 16).
    More detailed information can be found on the Medicine Wiki.

    A-Level


    A typical offer is for AAAb with a minimum ‘A’ Grade required in A2 chemistry and biology.

    More detailed information can be found on the Medicine Wiki and on the Faculty of Medicine website.

    UKCAT

    The UKCAT is not required as part of the entry requirements for Liverpool.

    GAMSAT


    For 2014 entry onwards, the University of Liverpool requires GAMSAT for graduates applying to both the A100 and A101 courses.


    UniReq
    is an excellent resource which will help guide you as to whether you can apply to Liverpool or not.

    University of Liverpool Admission Statistics 2011-12.

    Interview

    Liverpool typically interview from November until March and post-interview decisions are usually released at the end of March (see Decisions). The interviews are allocated on a random basis. Early UCAS applications should theoretically receive no benefit over those submitted on deadline day.

    The interviews are informal and are designed to engage with the applicant such that they are made to feel comfortable. The interview will generally last between 15-20 minutes.

    Please note that interview discussion is not allowed on the forums.

    Decisions
    To those who want to predict when offers will come out, I may lend a helping hand (or maybe not):

    - Offers are given out at 17:00 GMT on the day.
    - Offers and Rejections are jointly handed out 'at random'.
    - Offers and Rejections are most likely batched.
    - It is most likely that the first day of offers will be towards the latter half of the working week.

    This information largely applies to undergraduate students. All information has been collated from TSR and thus is not an accurate representation of when the UoL may actually have given out offers to students in the respective years. Furthermore, it is most likely the case that offers are given out in batches over several days. As such, the days listed below are the first day of offers.

    Friday 22nd March 2013
    Thursday 22nd March 2012
    Wednesday 16th March 2011
    Thursday 18th March 2010
    Tuesday 17th March 2009

    If I were to predict, I would suggest that Thursday 20th March 2014 would be when offers will first come out. This is by no means based on any statistics and is complete guess work so don't blame me if I am wrong!

    Admission Statistics


    2010
    Places Available: 290 (+31 International)
    Applications Received: -
    Interviews: -
    Applicants to Place Ratio: -

    2011
    Places Available: 292 (+24 International)
    Applications Received: >2500
    Interviews: -
    Applicants to Place Ratio: 9

    2012
    Places Available: 235 (+29 International)
    Applications Received: 3049
    Interviews: 1079
    Applicants to Place Ratio: 12

    2013
    Places Available: 228 (+23 International)
    Applications Received: 3081
    Interviews: 1087
    Applicants to Place Ratio: 12

    Detailed Statistics for 2013 Entry

    Average GCSE score for students rejected pre-interview: 16.0/18 (median 16)
    Average GCSE score for students invited to interview: 17.3/18 (median 18)
    Average GCSE score for students given an offer: 17.4/18 (median 18)

    Average Interview score for all students: 21.2/30 (median 22)
    Average Interview score for students given an offer: 25.9/30 (median 26, minimum 23)


    A Freedom of Information request detailing interview statistics for 2011 entry can be found here.

    Summary of FOI
    I have summarised the key statistics from the FOI:

    - Over 3000 applications were received for the A100 course.
    - 1970 (65%) candidates were rejected before interview.
    - 1079 (35%) candidates were interviewed.
    - From this, 527 (49%) offers were given out.
    - 265 (50%) students enrolled in 2012.

    The key points to note regarding interview were:

    - Generally, 17+ points were required on the GCSE scoring system.
    - Generally, 26+ points were required for the Personal Statement.

    The key points to note regarding offers were:

    - Generally, 18 points were required on the GCSE scoring system.
    - Generally, 26+ points were required in the Interview scoring system.


    Course Overview

    Overall
    Liverpool currently subscribes to the PBL approach (this is subject to change in the future pending review). Update: Please note that in October 2013, the decision was made to change the structure and content of the medical curriculum at Liverpool. The changes will take effect for students from the 2014 academic year onwards.

    The current (pre-2014) undergraduate course is a 5 year MBChB degree with the potential to intercalate between 4th and 5th year in a reasonable MPhil, MRes or BSc. Final medical exams are sat at the end of 4th year. An outline of the current (pre-2014) school curriculum is described below:

    1st Year


    There is minimal clinical contact in 1st year with the focus being on the basic sciences. There is also SSM 1 which is a 4 week ‘student study module’ which has to be completed. The focus is on basic sciences, clinical skills and communication skills.

    2nd Year


    The focus of this year is to gain clinical contact and learn basic pathology for the more common disorders. Students are attached in year-long placements to a hospital. They will attend twice a week.

    Random Hospital Allocations to:

    • Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals (RLBUH)
    • University Hospital of Aintree
    • Arrowe Park
    • Whiston (St Helens & Knowsley Trust)


    There is a 6 week ‘GP and Community’ rotation interlaced with hospital placement. SSM 2 and SSM 3 are also undertaken during 2nd year.

    3rd Year

    This is specialities year with rotations aiming to cover: paediatrics, obstetrics and gynaecology, psychiatry, neurology, community medicine (GP), therapeutics (pharmacology).

    Random Hospital Allocations to:


    • Therapeutics - RLBUH/Aintree
    • Paediatrics - Alder Hey/Whiston
    • Obs & Gynae - Liverpool Women’s/Whiston
    • GP - Various
    • Psychiatry - Various
    • Neurology - Walton Centre in Aintree


    Students are also required to complete SSM 4 and a Critical Thinking Module (CTM). SSM 4 is run over approximately 4 months with students expected to work one day a week towards it. It is possible to organise this SSM yourself on a topic of your choice.

    4th Year

    This is the dreaded finals year. Unlike most medical schools, medical finals are sat at the end of 4th year. Students will have been assigned to their base hospital at the end of 3rd year (students can choose what hospital/s they want but are not guaranteed their choice depending on popularity).

    New hospital options include:


    • Blackpool
    • Warrington
    • Chester
    • Southport and Ormskirk


    The year is split into blocks of 3 rotations: surgery, medicine and specialities. There is also a weekly GP/UCCT session (rotates every week).

    Finals are sat through June and are immediately followed, since 2013 onwards, by a 5-6 week elective period. Students also have the option to intercalate instead of moving directly into 5th year (thus making it a 6 year course).



    Accommodation

    Accommodation options include on-campus and off-campus accommodation. The university accommodation website has more details.

    Off-campus accommodation is located approximately 15-20 minutes away from campus (by car or bus). This includes the Greenbank halls and the Carnatic halls.



    The University & Campus

    The university is situated near to the city centre, approximately a 15 minute walk away. There is a good mix of Victorian, red-brick buildings and modern development on the site. The university Guild is currently being renovated.

    There is relatively easy access to the university regardless of where one is situated within Liverpool. For those living in off-campus halls of residence, there is a ‘university service’ bus which runs directly between halls of residence and campus. It takes approximately 20 minutes. It is prudent to consider buying a ‘student annual saver’ pass.

    There are two libraries on campus. The Harold Cohen library is dedicated towards health sciences and will be of most use.


    The City

    Liverpool is a great city full of life. There has recently been a lot of redevelopment with renovation of the Liverpool Docks area and the completion of L1, an outside shopping mall.

    The night life is also great. There are student nights every weekday during term time and although there aren’t any huge clubs, there’s enough choice and variety to satisfy everybody.


    FAQs (answered by current medical students - FAQs about PBL/the old course are in post 2)

    What medical societies are there and what is the mentoring system like? (answered by Kyalimers)

    The mentoring system is very good. It is set up by the LMSS and works pretty effectively. A lot of other societies (such as ISOC, NHSF Liverpool, JSOC) also have some mentoring system implemented for medics.

    Medical societies are now numerous and have grown rapidly in size and number recently. They include Surgical Scousers and the Student Physicians Society which organise weekly lectures throughout the year amongst other practical courses. There is also the Liverpool Paediatric Society, Liverpool SNOGS and Liverpool Psychiatry Society. These societies offer various benefits and also organise specialties revision day-courses toward the end of the year.

    The very popular ATACC Medical Student Society which organises trauma and critical care practical teaching for students throughout the year is usually over-subscribed and has proved to be increasingly useful for clinical students.

    A full list of societies at the university can be found at the LGoS website.



    Join the Facebook Liverpool Medics 2014 Entry Group if you have an offer!
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    FAQs cont'd

    What do you think of PBL? (answered by Kyalimers)

    + A lot of independence regarding when you do your work and how you do it
    +/- No need to go to lectures all the time (for me, a + as i fall asleep in boring lectures) N.B. Liv do have lectures, just not a course packed full of them.
    + PBL mixed with a clinical course such as here really gives you a good vocational experience of the future. It's all good learning things out of books for 4 years but if you can't apply that knowledge in a hospital, it's pointless imo.
    - You do tend to miss out some things whilst learning. The university have addressed this to some extent by releasing a curriculum map, but how this translates in practice will not transpire for another few years.
    +/- Some PBL convenors are great: they help you when it’s needed and give you a push and shove in the right direction. Others are not so good and adhere strictly to the PBL guidelines. They don't help at all and it'd be better not to have them! The faculty have also addressed non-medical personnel facilitating PBL. This should no longer happen.
    - There's definitely a lack of core knowledge; no-one would like to admit it but I don't think our physiology and anatomy is as good as it could be (that said, it's better than some other places).

    I am really interested in your views about studying medicine at Liverpool, how did you find it and what are the pros & cons? (answered by myrrh)

    Pros
    You have a lot of clinical experience and start learning how to preform exams very early in the course.
    You have loads of free time (at least in first year) so you're not cooped up in lecture theatres from 9-5.
    The HARC is a good way of learning anatomy as I find prosections more useful than dissection in the sense that it's already prepared for you.
    PBL is good in the sense that you can learn at your own pace.
    Very supportive network of older years.
    We get plenty of feedback in our formative exams and I feel this really helps in preparation for the summatives.

    Cons
    You often feel that you're lost in what you need to learn as you don't get given much guidance.
    We could do with more lectures because often the ones we have are really bad.
    Certain things should be taught instead of through PBL as the concepts are difficult to grasp.
    The lack of teaching can be frustrating at times. I mean after paying at least £9000 you'd expect a decent amount of teaching in aspects such as basic sciences.

    It has been suggested that the anatomy teaching is near enough non-existent, but you can learn if you really want to; you just have to be really pro-active about it. What do you make of this? (answered by Kyalimers)

    It's basically as you've said. That said, things have improved a fair bit and whilst the university gives 'minimal' anatomy teaching, there are weekly anatomy lectures by the ‘Surgical Scousers’ society. The faculty has also recently put on teaching in HARC for other years beyond 1st Years. Despite having gone to a grand total of zero anatomy teaching sessions put on by the university in any year, I would say my anatomy is actually decent. I do my own anatomy at home and also get supplementary teaching in hospitals. I am proactive and scrub up in theatre as much as possible to try and get stuck in to clinical anatomy; many don't and aren't interested in surgery so this is where the old cliché about 'Liverpool students suck at anatomy' comes from.

    What happens regarding PBL and lectures in years 3 and 4? (answered by Kyalimers)

    PBL in year 3 is dependent on what rotation you are on. It is most likely to be based at the hospital/centre you are based in for that rotation. There are some rotation where PBL remains in the university buildings. In 3rd year, you will also have to do PBL sessions which are not facilitated. Similarly, lectures in 3rd year are rotation dependent. You will receive lectures at hospital or in university which are relevant to your current rotation.

    4th year sees you attached to a base hospital/s. Your PBL will be organised for you at these hospitals and should be relevant to your rotation. For example, if you are based at Alder Hey for the paediatrics rotation, then you will have paediatric PBL sessions organised there. Again, lectures are organised for you by your hospital depending on what rotation you are on. Every hospital has different levels of teaching and some are better than others at organising teaching and lectures. As a general rule of thumb, the further away from Liverpool university you go, the better the quality and quantity of teaching you get. However, there are also negatives; increased travel time and having to stay in longer to name a couple.

    What do you like about PBL? (answered by Kaylea; edited by Kyalimers)

    I like how PBL is my work and only I can do it; no one is going to do your work for you when you're a doctor so why should the lecturers do that now? The lecturers and PBL facilitators offer prompts and point you in the right direction but that is all (like symptoms of a disease) and then off you go to figure it out.

    Also through PBL, I have become an efficient and independent learner who can now easily make 'Learning Objectives' (which does sound easy but in those first few weeks it was very tricky). Now, they are concise and straight to the point. Plus you have to have that skill when you're on placement. For example, if I come across something that I don't know such as 'ascites,' I can now make an objective which would include: why I need to know about it, who it effects, what its effects are and how to tackle it. A student from a lecture based course would come up with "I need to learn everything there is to know", without asking why I need to know it.

    PBL is a great way to meet people and it helps your social skills immensely. Where as in a lecture, you can easily get lost in the crowd, so to speak. This doesnt happen in the PBL sessions because there are so few of us (7 to a group) and if you struggle on one topic, someone else in the group will understand it and be able to explain it to you. PBL is good because it gives you the opportunity to look at how different people revise and learn new techniques for yourself, plus they might have little tricks on how to remember things.

    PBL also helps you develop teaching skills as you have to explain and teach things to each other in your group (like you would a patient or a concerned mother). Not to mention if you go off on tangents easily (which I usually do), there is always someone there to stop you and reign you in.

    PBL itself is brilliant because it makes you learn the things you need to know and you ask yourself continually "why do I need to know this?" Put it this way: I had 12 weeks of hard core PBL, in which there was a lot to learn. I literally did 1 week worth of revision and still passed my mock exams. I am not the super clever person of the year: I am average. The only reason I passed is because I worked hard for the first 3 months and statistics have shown that PBL is a better way to learn when compared to pure lecture based courses. (Imagine 5 hours of lectures a day :/, I can barely manage 50 minutes as it is).

    What do you dislike about PBL? (answered by Kaylea; edited by Kyalimers)

    There isn't a lot of structure to a PBL course and there is no set book which you can learn everything out of. Instead, you have to go to multiple resources to gather your notes from and even then you don't know if you're right until your following PBL session (this was my biggest problem at first but I have never gone back and been told I did it wrong).

    PBL is broad and different PBL groups have different objectives so you have to look at their objectives too at times or follow the official objectives to see if you could do any extra reading. There is also no/minimal teaching going on so you have to do it by yourself and if you get stuck you have to get over the fear of asking for help and looking 'daft'. I had a problem with this at the start of the year: I couldn't wrap my head around stats and I kept it to myself but after a while, I saw that other people were struggling and so I asked for help. No one laughed or called me dumb, instead they helped me and in return there was almost always something they were stuck on that I could help them with.

    You get used to being one of the clever/hardworking ones at GCSE and A Level where you rarely ask questions or get things wrong, where as in medical school everyone is that person and I was so terrified of getting something wrong that I never voiced my opinions. Now though, as my year group will tell you, I just don't shut up: I'm always debating in the lectures even if I'm completely wrong and then I just laugh it off.



    Resources

    As of 2014, I am in the process of trialling this resources section.

    ​The online viewer is not great. I strongly recommend you download the following content before viewing.

    In orange, I have indicated which year/s the content is most appropriate for (years in brackets will find it suitable, but less useful).


    Unofficial Book Lists

    Year 1 Book List
    Year 2 Book List

    Questions

    Basic Sciences EMQs - Paper 1 - 1, 2 (3, 4)

    PP

    Statistical Definitions (PP) - 1, 2, 4

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    Reserving this post for further content/questions.

    Also, a little bump for the thread.
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    May apply to Liverpool. Its not in my top 5, but if my UKCAT doesn't go to plan, Liverpool will definitely be one of my options
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    May apply here, if I do get a high UKCAT score though, I'll most likely apply somewhere else. But Liverpool is great!!
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    (Original post by mynameisntbobk)
    May apply to Liverpool. Its not in my top 5, but if my UKCAT doesn't go to plan, Liverpool will definitely be one of my options
    (Original post by frogs r everywhere)
    May apply here, if I do get a high UKCAT score though, I'll most likely apply somewhere else. But Liverpool is great!!
    I'd just advise you not to base your decision solely on your UKCAT scores. Of course it's important, but choose somewhere where you like the city and more importantly the course.

    Remember also that Liverpool is undergoing a curriculum review and the course structure is likely to change. I'm hopeful they will be taking student feedback into account and if so, there is a lot of potential for the course at Liverpool to excel.
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    Liverpool now requires GAMSAT for graduate applicants. I wonder what the cut - off for interview will be... Exeter's is around 64. Hopefully Liverpool's won't be much higher!!
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    (Original post by Arrhythmia)
    Liverpool now requires GAMSAT for graduate applicants. I wonder what the cut - off for interview will be... Exeter's is around 64. Hopefully Liverpool's won't be much higher!!
    Ahh thanks for posting this. I'll update the OP
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    (Original post by Kyalimers)
    Ahh thanks for posting this. I'll update the OP
    It may not seem like it now, but between November and March, this thread will be filled with anxious medical applicants on the bridge of turning crazy. :lol:
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    (Original post by frogs r everywhere)
    It may not seem like it now, but between November and March, this thread will be filled with anxious medical applicants on the bridge of turning crazy. :lol:
    I know, that's why I've made this thread early and unlike previous years, tried to give a structure to the OP so hopefully questions don't get repeated.
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    Hey!!
    are any of you reapplicants? Planning on reapplying to Liverpool??
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    Guys I have a question.

    I know Liverpool rank your top 9 GCSEs, but I only have 8, which would rack up 15 points. I do also have 2 half GCSEs at grade As, and I know Liverpool do use 2 short courses in place of 1 full course, so would that mean they'd look at my 8 full GCSEs and my 2 half GCSEs? That would give me 17 points which is substantially better than the 15
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    (Original post by mynameisntbobk)
    Guys I have a question.

    I know Liverpool rank your top 9 GCSEs, but I only have 8, which would rack up 15 points. I do also have 2 half GCSEs at grade As, and I know Liverpool do use 2 short courses in place of 1 full course, so would that mean they'd look at my 8 full GCSEs and my 2 half GCSEs? That would give me 17 points which is substantially better than the 15
    It would be 16, not 17.

    If you click on the first admissions requirements document on this link:

    Short course GCSEs will at most receive half the points of a full GCSE but two short courses can be offered in place of a full GCSE.
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    (Original post by Maxxie)
    It would be 16, not 17.

    If you click on the first admissions requirements document on this link:
    See I didn't really get that. Does that mean they will consider both my short course GCSEs instead of a 9th full course GCSE, or will they only look at one?
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    (Original post by mynameisntbobk)
    See I didn't really get that. Does that mean they will consider both my short course GCSEs instead of a 9th full course GCSE, or will they only look at one?
    Oh sorry, it would be 17 because each one would receive half the standard amount of points for a full course GCSE. So both together make up for one full course A grade GCSE giving you two extra points (they'll consider both your short course GCSEs instead of a ninth full course GCSE).

    Sorry for the confusion
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    (Original post by Maxxie)
    Oh sorry, it would be 17 because each one would receive half the standard amount of points for a full course GCSE. So both together make up for one full course A grade GCSE giving you two extra points (they'll consider both your short course GCSEs instead of a ninth full course GCSE).

    Sorry for the confusion
    No problem at least it makes sense now 17's not too bad a score, so its definitely worth considering Liverpool.
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    Anyone yet to read the Preliminary Curriculum Review Report may find it an interesting read. From the perspective of a student, I still think that there is some room for improvement but this is definitely a step in the right direction; especially for the first year course.
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    Hey, just thought I'd point out that the SSM 1 in first year was 4 weeks long not 6. I just finished 1st year at Liverpool unless its been changed for the coming year
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    (Original post by Kaylain)
    Hey, just thought I'd point out that the SSM 1 in first year was 4 weeks long not 6. I just finished 1st year at Liverpool unless its been changed for the coming year
    Thanks, I think it was a typo. Never has been 6 weeks long but it used to be the case that we had to do 6 SSMs. No longer the case! And do let me know of any other errors/additions


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    For GCSE I got 6A* 1A 1B and a short course B as well, would I stand a chance at applying to Liverpool? Btw I think my gcses add up to a score of 15.5

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