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    I am currently studying towards my A2 levels and have applied UK unis for LL.B courses. However I am interested in LL.B courses in the Netherlands as well.

    I am aware that there are seven compulsory law modules that UK unis offer in order to enable further study to practice as a solicitor etc.

    So I am wondering whether graduating with a LL.B from the Netherlands will also allow me to practice in the UK. It is a common law country so it should do, right? :confused:
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    Dutch law degrees are mostly taught in Dutch and very oriented towards the Netherlands. I don't think it is wise to study law here if you have plans to work in the UK. However, if you really want to study in the Netherlands and return to the UK perhaps an English taught degree in one of the social sciences (e.g. Economics, International Relations, Psychology etc) might be more suitable.
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    Agreed - or a liberal arts degree at one of the Dutch "university colleges" - these are well respected and will give you a well-rounded education that could be a good launch-pad for further study in law (or anything else) back in the UK. See here for more info about the UCs.
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    LOL first of all there is no common law country on the European continent and if there was one it definitely wouldn't be the Netherlands... If you're gonna do a non-UK law degree you have to take the conversion course, which I guess would still be worth it since you would save a lot of money on tuition fees. Alternatively, you could just learn Dutch and become a Dutch advocaat, which I guess is a much cheaper and more effective way (one year masters, 3 years payed traineeship), afterwards you could move and be a solicitor in the UK anytime. Also there are many offices of big English law firms in Amsterdam.
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    (Original post by Kyle Butler)
    LOL first of all there is no common law country on the European continent and if there was one it definitely wouldn't be the Netherlands... If you're gonna do a non-UK law degree you have to take the conversion course, which I guess would still be worth it since you would save a lot of money on tuition fees. Alternatively, you could just learn Dutch and become a Dutch advocaat, which I guess is a much cheaper and more effective way (one year masters, 3 years payed traineeship), afterwards you could move and be a solicitor in the UK anytime. Also there are many offices of big English law firms in Amsterdam.
    Mastering the Dutch language at a professional/academic level takes at least 5 or more years. And after all that, most would still be at a disadvantage compared to native Dutch law students.

    Just something to take into account and not underestimate.
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    (Original post by untitled63)
    I am currently studying towards my A2 levels and have applied UK unis for LL.B courses. However I am interested in LL.B courses in the Netherlands as well.

    I am aware that there are seven compulsory law modules that UK unis offer in order to enable further study to practice as a solicitor etc.

    So I am wondering whether graduating with a LL.B from the Netherlands will also allow me to practice in the UK. It is a common law country so it should do, right? :confused:
    No, it won't allow you to practice in the UK (incidentally the UK has multiple legal systems as Scottish law is different from Anglo-Welsh law). The Netherlands is not a common law country. You could do a law degree, then take a conversion course followed by a training contract; or, if you become a qualified advocaat in the Netherlands (or any other recognized jurisdiction), a QLTS test.

    At least I think that is right, in any case it is not a very sensible route to take unless there is some particularly amazing reason that you want to study in the Netherlands at undergraduate level.
 
 
 
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