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Does having children excuse the person/parent to come late for work? Watch

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    I just watched this show where the mother wanted to come a bit late for a meeting because she wanted to send her son for his first day of school, and the boss (who happened to be single) snapped and said; "how is this my problem?".

    The person argued that she loved her job but there must be balance. The boss replied back and said; "how about the single people? they also want to have "balance" wouldn't they?"

    Whose side are you on?
    In real life, should the parent(s) be excused from work because of things like the above?
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    I think this should be excused.

    Imagine if that was your first child. Experiences such as their first day at school are so exciting not only for the child, but for you yourself. Being there to capture the moment is an incredible feeling. This boss is being far too unreasonable.


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    Needs more context. I'd say a first day at school is a very predictable event, she should have told the boss about it months in advance. Mentioning it for the first time the day before (if that's the context) is going to irritate a boss.
    Things like school being closed by snow or kid accidentally breaking a leg are going to be effectively unpredictable acts of god.
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    As long is this sort of thing doesn't happen regularly, it's not an issue. If it's a weekly thing that the mother is running late for work because of her child, this doesn't work for a company. Workers should be held at the same standard, and exceptions are made for everyone on occasion.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    Needs more context. I'd say a first day at school is a very predictable event, she should have told the boss about it months in advance. Mentioning it for the first time the day before (if that's the context) is going to irritate a boss.
    Things like school being closed by snow or kid accidentally breaking a leg are going to be effectively unpredictable acts of god.
    So essentially, she shouldn't be excused?
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    I think it very much depends on the context, amount of notice, whether the parent requested flexible working, whether business needs allowed it, if the parent had a new contract, and so on. There's also an element of who the employee is, if they've historically done favours for the company or if they're someone who refuses to do anything apart from what they're paid for. Employees who are willing to give more are generally permitted to take more. And it's a question of cover, how important the employee is, who else is affected by their absence, whether the meeting would have to be rescheduled, etc.

    Scenario 1 - the mother is a police officer who has a court appointment as a witness, and has at short notice asked to arrive late. Only she can perform this function, and if she couldn't be on time, the whole thing has to be rescheduled. That should be turned down.

    Scenario 2 - the mother works in a call centre as part of a team of 30 people. 29 people can comfortably take up the slack left by one person, and she asked last month if she could miss part of the weekly team meeting. You'd expect a reasonable manager to allow that.

    I think generally managers are expected to allow flexible working or a little leeway when possible, and it's good management to do so if you can (otherwise you get an annoyed employee who will not work as hard) but there has to be a balance between that and the needs of the organisation.
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    (Original post by kka25)
    So essentially, she shouldn't be excused?
    No I'm saying it depends on context more than reason.
    Try and see it from the bosses pov. If she could have told him months ahead, that would have allowed plenty of time to reschedule a meeting or arrange cover. If it's the day before, you've given the boss a much bigger problem and made him angry. First days at school shouldn't be a suprise, schools publish timetables months or years in advance.

    If she had asked for a half day months in advance I'd say it was probably unreasonable to refuse.
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    (Original post by expectopatronumm)
    I think this should be excused.

    Imagine if that was your first child. Experiences such as their first day at school are so exciting not only for the child, but for you yourself. Being there to capture the moment is an incredible feeling. This boss is being far too unreasonable.


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    Not really, if I were an employer I wouldn't mind giving them a chance to see their kids first day of school, but they would have to ask in advance. I wouldn't accept someone phoning up on the day expecting time off for something they could have easily arranged weeks ago.
 
 
 
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