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    Hi everyone, basically today was LSE open day and during the subject talk for economics (which I had originally planned to do) the lady speaking mentioned several times that it is a very maths intensive course and that 70% of those who apply for it have further maths. Has anyone done this course or economics elsewhere and if so is there truly a really great deal of maths involved? I don't do further maths so will I be heavily disadvantaged because of that? :/ I don't HATE maths but it isn't something I really really enjoy :/ thanks for any replies


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    Economics is very quantitative, especially at top universities such as LSE, UCL and Cambridge. Durham is less quantitative (as it's a BA, not a BSc) however there's still maths involved. There's a reason why they ask for an A* in maths, and most prefer further maths too.

    http://www2.lse.ac.uk/study/undergra..._BSc_Econ.aspx

    Just look at that page - 'Further Maths is preferred and seen as a 4th subject'. Scroll down and look at the module selection - mathematical methods, statistical methods, econometrics.. All maths
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    (Original post by Lameesh)
    Hi everyone, basically today was LSE open day and during the subject talk for economics (which I had originally planned to do) the lady speaking mentioned several times that it is a very maths intensive course and that 70% of those who apply for it have further maths. Has anyone done this course or economics elsewhere and if so is there truly a really great deal of maths involved? I don't do further maths so will I be heavily disadvantaged because of that? :/ I don't HATE maths but it isn't something I really really enjoy :/ thanks for any replies


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    Tbh, if you're looking at the top universities for Economics you'll find that a lot of them will be maths-intensive. If you don't enjoy maths you could always look at joint courses which place less emphasis on the subject?
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    If you look outside LSE (and Oxbridge, UCL, Warwick etc.) there are less Maths-intensive Economics courses. For example, Sheffield have separate streams for their Economics courses for those with and without A-level Maths. But it's true that most Econ courses will be mathematical. Have you thought about Economic History?
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    (Original post by You!Me!Dancing!)
    If you look outside LSE (and Oxbridge, UCL, Warwick etc.) there are less Maths-intensive Economics courses. For example, Sheffield have separate streams for their Economics courses for those with and without A-level Maths. But it's true that most Econ courses will be mathematical. Have you thought about Economic History?
    The thing is I'm looking to stay inside London :/ so limits my choices, I'm reallyyyy not into history but I've been searching other unis and SOAS seems good - def less maths intensive


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    (Original post by CD315)
    Economics is very quantitative, especially at top universities such as LSE, UCL and Cambridge. Durham is less quantitative (as it's a BA, not a BSc) however there's still maths involved. There's a reason why they ask for an A* in maths, and most prefer further maths too.

    http://www2.lse.ac.uk/study/undergra..._BSc_Econ.aspx

    Just look at that page - 'Further Maths is preferred and seen as a 4th subject'. Scroll down and look at the module selection - mathematical methods, statistical methods, econometrics.. All maths
    Yeah, I'm beginning to think LSE isn't for me - I didn't do further cos I wouldn't enjoy it let alone a maths based degree! Thinking to aim lower in terms of unis, thanks for your reply


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    Didn't do further maths pre-LSE and took all of the most quant courses including many options from the maths department and got a high first.

    MA100 assumes no knowledge of FM and goes way beyond it by the end of the year so you really will be OK as long as you're not put off by new maths material.
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    if you want to do banking or something after try and look up a joint degree at a top uni.
    economics is highly popular so doing a less mathematical course at a less good uni may benifit you in your three years at uni, but wont do you any favours when your looking for jobs
    if i were you try and find a joint course at a topp uni that would suit you
    hope that helps
 
 
 
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