Join TSR now and get all your revision questions answeredSign up now

abit of a freak out right now!! Watch

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    We've all been there.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    Of course your life goes on. Why wouldn't it? Anything to the contrary would imply that my reporting of your post resulted in some sort of long-distance manslaughter, which is absurd.

    Did you achieve straight A*s at GCSE and 100% at AS/A2-level? If not, why would you be happy with your grades? I say that there's always room for improvement, and there's no shame in asking us high achievers for some help
    Generally, being a massive **** head doesn't get you very far in life.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    What supreme title? If you mean "high achievers" then it's true. I achieve highly. If you don't think that A*s at A-level are high then you ought to consider the bell curve.
    What? I didn't say anything of the sort, I just said why can't you consider that not everyone can get A*'s at A-level and people work at different rates and different skill levels, you can help people yes, but don't say AAB are awful grades, because EEE is awful grades, AAB indicates some substantial effort gone in to achieve said grades.

    What I'm saying is not everyone is like you, and you need to consider this when giving your responses as nobody likes someone up in their arse about their own grades
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Robbie242)
    What? I didn't say anything of the sort, I just said why can't you consider that not everyone can get A*'s at A-level and people work at different rates and different skill levels, you can help people yes, but don't say AAB are awful grades, because EEE is awful grades, AAB indicates some substantial effort gone in to achieve said grades.

    What I'm saying is not everyone is like you, and you need to consider this when giving your responses as nobody likes someone up in their arse about their own grades
    I never said AAB was awful?

    I said it was easy for me, and easy (certainly doable) for someone with an offer to an AAB course.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    I'm not boasting. I am aware that I have been blessed with extraordinary intelligence, and want only for others to benefit from it. Therefore, I am giving good advice to people who are less fortunate.
    If you have been "blessed" with it then you are obviously not someone to give advice on hard work.

    I also love how your exam predictions vary only about 10-20% from someone which a completely different school/circumstances but you are quick to label them as some sort of cretin.

    And if you think getting A*s in your A-levels is "extraordinary intelligence" then you are sadly deluded.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by officelinebacker)
    Ok, read and follow these steps:

    1) Shut up and calm the **** down.
    2) Create a proper revision timetable, short working periods of around 40 minutes with a break between each one, and don't overload in a day. You don't need to be doing 12 hours work, aim for at most 10 sessions a day, that will give you just shy of 7 hours revision.
    3) Get into a proper routine, go to bed early, get a full nights sleep, and aim to start revision at the same time each day.
    4) Find a revision method that works for you. It's no good just sitting and reading through papers if you don't learn that way, you need to find a way that works properly for you. Personally I first go through and rewrite all of my notes in a more compressed form, then I do a few past papers using my notes when I need them, and then I do a few more papers without using my notes. I then go back over the papers, see where I've made mistakes, and go over the relevant sections in the notes.

    Revision isn't a complicated process, you just need to stay calm, find a method that works for you, and use your time efficiently.
    thanks, thats useful advice yer my revision timetable consists of about 3 breaks - one for lunch, one for dinner n a 20 min one just coz... maybe i should alter it...

    (Original post by jellybeansnkmk)
    Im doing all cie. It drives me crazy. But i understand your situation. Just study hard but when you can't breath and what you're studying doesn't make sense, take 5 minutes off. It helps fr me. Sometimes studying for longer hours doesn't mean you are studying more.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    thanks yer i was doing some music notes and just thought... i do not know any of this...

    whats cie? sorry :P
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Season One)
    Generally, being a massive **** head doesn't get you very far in life.
    I am evidence to the contrary, however. It's certainly worked for me in terms of uni places and jobs. Employers seem to love me :dontknow:
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    I never said AAB was awful?

    I said it was easy for me, and easy (certainly doable) for someone with an offer to an AAB course.
    the AAB course was my highest offer. but the uni is where i REALLY want to go to. im willing to put the effort in etc... but its very hard for me to understand what some questions mean (exam technique) and write down exactly what the examiners want. for example, i revised alot for psychology unit 1, got 2 marks off a B. media a2 i was expected to get an A, infact got a U. i understand it may be easy for you but its really difficult for me and alot of other people too
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by megfashion)
    thanks, thats useful advice yer my revision timetable consists of about 3 breaks - one for lunch, one for dinner n a 20 min one just coz... maybe i should alter it...



    thanks yer i was doing some music notes and just thought... i do not know any of this...

    whats cie? sorry :P
    Just don't panic. Find teachers or friends. It will bother them but u need help. I just humble myself down and go find my teachers these days. Cie is just another board of examination.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by megfashion)
    the AAB course was my highest offer. but the uni is where i REALLY want to go to. im willing to put the effort in etc... but its very hard for me to understand what some questions mean (exam technique) and write down exactly what the examiners want. for example, i revised alot for psychology unit 1, got 2 marks off a B. media a2 i was expected to get an A, infact got a U. i understand it may be easy for you but its really difficult for me and alot of other people too
    A big portion of A-levels is down to exam technique.

    I found that the best thing to do first was to find the exam specification which is a list of points that you need to know. Nothing will be on the exam that is not on the specification. You should make notes on each point mentioned.

    Then start doing and marking past papers. Start at about 2006 and work forwards, then for each thing you got wrong find the right answer and add it to your notes.

    Hope I helped slightly.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by therisenmitten)
    A big portion of A-levels is down to exam technique.

    I found that the best thing to do first was to find the exam specification which is a list of points that you need to know. Nothing will be on the exam that is not on the specification. You should make notes on each point mentioned.

    Then start doing and marking past papers. Start at about 2006 and work forwards, then for each thing you got wrong find the right answer and add it to your notes.

    Hope I helped slightly.
    ok thanks... yer i usually only look at the text book and just rote-learn the key studies/theories (also i enjoy the information but i still try n rote-learn it)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by megfashion)
    thanks, thats useful advice yer my revision timetable consists of about 3 breaks - one for lunch, one for dinner n a 20 min one just coz... maybe i should alter it...
    Damn right you should. Revising for a long period of time without any breaks is pointless, after a while you don't really take anything in and it's just a waste of time.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Are you serious? You still have a whole months left!
    I have my IB examinations and I am aiming to achieve 44+ points, I study 3-5 hours a day and I'm totally fine with the timing...
    I cannot believe that you actually study for 10 hours. If you do, you shouildnt have a problem.
    If not, revise without a laptop and make sure you understand everything you are supposed to learn, youll do fine!
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by megfashion)
    ok thanks... yer i usually only look at the text book and just rote-learn the key studies/theories (also i enjoy the information but i still try n rote-learn it)
    Definitely try learning from the specification, it's a shame that teachers don't tell you about it (you can find it online). I find that textbooks are good for looking something up but can be pretty daunting to revise from.

    Also you have plenty of time if you plan well. I have university exams at around the same time and haven't started yet. Don't panic!
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    You have time, don't panic. 2 months is a lot of revision time. Wait until you get to university and have about 3 weeks

    But seriously, revision isn't the problem - it's your attitude to revision that's the [potential] problem.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rascacielos)
    You have time, don't panic. 2 months is a lot of revision time. Wait until you get to university and have about 3 weeks

    But seriously, revision isn't the problem - it's your attitude to revision that's the [potential] problem.
    Sorry that my rep is worthless but this is so brief yet so correct. With the vast majority of people it's not that they cannot effectively revise. If you keep putting 10 hour shifts in you will burn out horribly. Your brain will 'fry' in a metaphorical sense. Revise in a sensible structure, the school day is set out in the way it is for a reason so that is a good model to follow. You've shown you're motivated to work OP, that's the first hurdle and the one that most people find in their way most frequently. Now you have to make your time effective. Find ways that work for you by trial and error, don't just do the same thing or you'll get bored and any time you lack motivation, think of the end goal.

    If only I could follow my own revision tips, I may be able to achieve better marks. Oh and that bit of negativity just reminded me. You have to keep positive, you can do it and so can I. As soon as you start thinking you're going to **** up, you'll **** up i'm afraid.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    I am evidence to the contrary, however. It's certainly worked for me in terms of uni places and jobs. Employers seem to love me :dontknow:
    Who was your doctoral advisor, may I ask :rolleyes:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by therisenmitten)
    If you have been "blessed" with it then you are obviously not someone to give advice on hard work.

    I also love how your exam predictions vary only about 10-20% from someone which a completely different school/circumstances but you are quick to label them as some sort of cretin.

    And if you think getting A*s in your A-levels is "extraordinary intelligence" then you are sadly deluded.
    They're not predictions. I finished my A levels years ago. Nowhere did I cite my A level grades as sufficient evidence for my intelligence, but given that even the most gifted can only achieve what I achieved at A level, it's certainly not evidence to the contrary.

    I base my intelligence estimate on my success in academia (double first class honours BA, an MSc, and a research PhD, all at diffierent institutions, and all world top 5) and the workplace, where I have had the success to earn a highly comfortable six figure salary.

    (Original post by Felix Felicis)
    Who was your doctoral advisor, may I ask :rolleyes:
    In the interest of anonymity I would rather not name my advisor. I would inform you of my area of work but that would lead you to a very easy inference as to my identity.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    They're not predictions. I finished my A levels years ago. Nowhere did I cite my A level grades as sufficient evidence for my intelligence, but given that even the most gifted can only achieve what I achieved at A level, it's certainly not evidence to the contrary.

    I base my intelligence estimate on my success in academia (double first class honours BA, an MSc, and a research PhD, all at diffierent institutions, and all world top 5) and the workplace, where I have had the success to earn a highly comfortable six figure salary.


    In the interest of anonymity I would rather not name my advisor.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    if you earn a 6 figure salary and not a student anymore, may i ask as to why you are on tsr? :P
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by megfashion)
    if you earn a 6 figure salary and not a student anymore, may i ask as to why you are on tsr? :P
    There are numerous graduates on this forum, is all I can say. I am here simply to pass some time and look up some things I wished to know.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
Poll
Which web browser do you use?
Useful revision links

Articles

Writing revision notes

Our top revision articles

Tips and advice on making the most of your study time.

Boomarked book

Superpowered study

Take the hard work out of revising with our masterplan.

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Can you help? Study Help unanswered threadsStudy Help rules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.