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    Hi there, I recently posted this topic, and whilst I received one fantastic reply, I would really like some in-depth personal opinions on this:

    So here's the story:

    I'm currently studying at the University of York, in my first year. Currently I'm not enjoying the course that much, and I felt that whilst it was challenging, politics lacked a lot of what I'd like to call 'relevant' history. I'm a little tired of hearing about a mix between environment and the New Right.

    For my second year, I was accepted to study at the University of Sydney. I'd be studying a little more flexible modules, but I'm dreading having to crawl through Modern Politics Thought all over again. The trip will be pretty expensive, but it'd be a fantastic opportunity and would show real insight.

    However...

    As I was not enjoying my first year, I thought that I should keep my options open and apply for UCAS. I had seen a lot of other unhappy students do it, so I thought I should do the same. I applied to study Economic History at LSE, and I was given an unconditional.

    This would mean starting at square one on a new course, which I feel I'd prefer more, but obviously I would have essentially wasted £9,000.

    If I studied there I would commute in my second and third years. It'd save time and money (I live 20 minutes away by train), and I'd enjoy being with my family. However now that I've had a taste of independence, It'd be good to have a greater taste of it.

    Prestige-wise, LSE would be amazing. One of the things I am so happy about is that you can study optional modules anywhere else in LSE. I'd ideally study economic history, and then study other modules in introductory law and cross border M&A in my second year.

    I'm currently swayed towards LSE. I think it's a great university, but I'm not sure if I'm making a bad investment here.

    Now I'd like to hear your opinion: what would you do in this situation, and what do you think I should do?

    Thank you very much!
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    Hi there!
    Im currently in a similar situation, studying economics in exeter and finding it all a bit dull.
    Rather than starting again as a first year, have you looked into transferring your course to a different Uni?
    For example, I've looked into this and found that economics is a lot different in LSE and UCL than in exeter! As long as your course has followed a reasonably good structure, you should be able to transfer to another Uni that perhaps offers different modules.
    Another option you have is to do a conversion course, so change course to something that's fairly relevant to what you have already studied, but again you wouldn't have to be a first year.
    If you're really unhappy, then you need to make a change. A university degree is never a waste of money, but don't rush into anything before you've weighed up all options.
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    Go to LSE.

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    (Original post by rachelcichuta)
    Hi there!
    Im currently in a similar situation, studying economics in exeter and finding it all a bit dull.
    Rather than starting again as a first year, have you looked into transferring your course to a different Uni?
    For example, I've looked into this and found that economics is a lot different in LSE and UCL than in exeter! As long as your course has followed a reasonably good structure, you should be able to transfer to another Uni that perhaps offers different modules.
    Another option you have is to do a conversion course, so change course to something that's fairly relevant to what you have already studied, but again you wouldn't have to be a first year.
    If you're really unhappy, then you need to make a change. A university degree is never a waste of money, but don't rush into anything before you've weighed up all options.
    I did look into this, but the Government department of LSE doesn't offer a switch. Anywhere else I'd ideally like to go, such as UCL or Bristol, don't offer this type of switch. I'm really tempted to restart at LSE, because in my opinion the £9,000 I lose doesn't even matter, as you only have to pay it back over a long period of time.
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    Just wondering did you apply for LSE using your A levels result or year one result? And did you mention in your personal statement you are a year one student and the reasons for changing an institution?
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    Any other advice?
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    University does get dull on occassion, and moving course won't magic that away. If you trily believe that your current course will not get you where you want in life then change, but i would stick it out personally. The exchange to sydney will look amazing on your cv, and despite going over old ground that you werent too keen on the first time- im sure theyll approach it differently
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    (Original post by Maerdl)
    Just wondering did you apply for LSE using your A levels result or year one result? And did you mention in your personal statement you are a year one student and the reasons for changing an institution?
    I'm curious to know this as well...
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    (Original post by helpme101)
    I'm curious to know this as well...
    Well, I'm not 100% sure what I wrote in my personal statement, I wrote it up in and sent it off very quickly. I did however state that I was a current student at York, and that I felt that being nearer London would better impact my education.

    It's worth fully explaining why you're changing. I was 100% honest on my application.
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    Bump (PS thanks for the opinions so far. Contemplating LSE atm)
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    Bumping this thread since I still can't decide on whether this is the right route to go. I can't wait to sleep easy after this haze clears and everything becomes clear.
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    (Original post by Leondrip)
    Hi there, I recently posted this topic, and whilst I received one fantastic reply, I would really like some in-depth personal opinions on this:

    So here's the story:

    I'm currently studying at the University of York, in my first year. Currently I'm not enjoying the course that much, and I felt that whilst it was challenging, politics lacked a lot of what I'd like to call 'relevant' history. I'm a little tired of hearing about a mix between environment and the New Right.

    For my second year, I was accepted to study at the University of Sydney. I'd be studying a little more flexible modules, but I'm dreading having to crawl through Modern Politics Thought all over again. The trip will be pretty expensive, but it'd be a fantastic opportunity and would show real insight.

    However...

    As I was not enjoying my first year, I thought that I should keep my options open and apply for UCAS. I had seen a lot of other unhappy students do it, so I thought I should do the same. I applied to study Economic History at LSE, and I was given an unconditional.

    This would mean starting at square one on a new course, which I feel I'd prefer more, but obviously I would have essentially wasted £9,000.

    If I studied there I would commute in my second and third years. It'd save time and money (I live 20 minutes away by train), and I'd enjoy being with my family. However now that I've had a taste of independence, It'd be good to have a greater taste of it.

    Prestige-wise, LSE would be amazing. One of the things I am so happy about is that you can study optional modules anywhere else in LSE. I'd ideally study economic history, and then study other modules in introductory law and cross border M&A in my second year.

    I'm currently swayed towards LSE. I think it's a great university, but I'm not sure if I'm making a bad investment here.

    Now I'd like to hear your opinion: what would you do in this situation, and what do you think I should do?

    Thank you very much!
    It seems like you've already made up your mind and the only thing stopping you is the 9000 you've already spent at York. Go to LSE, you'll be much happier there clearly! Would you rather spend another 18000 at York and be unhappy or forfeit the 9000 you've already spent there and start over at LSE? All that 9000 is is a bit extra on top of your student loan, which you will probably never pay all back due to it being wiped after 30 years.
    You seems like you'll be much happier at LSE, so go there.
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    It seems like you've already made up your mind and the only thing stopping you is the 9000 you've already spent at York. Go to LSE, you'll be much happier there clearly! Would you rather spend another 18000 at York and be unhappy or forfeit the 9000 you've already spent there and start over at LSE? All that 9000 is is a bit extra on top of your student loan, which you will probably never pay all back due to it being wiped after 30 years.
    You seems like you'll be much happier at LSE, so go there.
    Thanks for this, I think that's what I'm going to do. I still need to check out the course a little bit more, but other than that I'm pretty decided. I've always been pretty career orientated, so I wonder if you could answer this for me:

    Do you see more benefit in LSE, as opposed to York and Sydney? Would they value the reputation of LSE more than a study abroad? A few people have been telling me that Sydney would look far better as it shows that I can go out of my comfort zone.
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    (Original post by Leondrip)
    Thanks for this, I think that's what I'm going to do. I still need to check out the course a little bit more, but other than that I'm pretty decided. I've always been pretty career orientated, so I wonder if you could answer this for me:

    Do you see more benefit in LSE, as opposed to York and Sydney? Would they value the reputation of LSE more than a study abroad? A few people have been telling me that Sydney would look far better as it shows that I can go out of my comfort zone.
    Economics at LSE will look amazing on your CV. If you want to go to Sydney you can do it after you degree, or you could even spend one of your summers there!
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    Id go to LSE but the issue youd be facing is you have no guarentee youd be accepted there do you?
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    (Original post by cl_steele)
    Id go to LSE but the issue youd be facing is you have no guarentee youd be accepted there do you?
    I have an unconditional offer to study economic history there.
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    Economics at LSE will look amazing on your CV. If you want to go to Sydney you can do it after you degree, or you could even spend one of your summers there!
    Yeah, this is exactly what my parents have been telling me. They are quite big on academics, and are pretty persuasive when it comes to going to LSE, offering me to money to go to Sydney if I did choose LSE.
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    (Original post by Leondrip)
    I have an unconditional offer to study economic history there.
    go for it then.
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    I think the main put-off I am suffering with is the view that I may be throwing away good grades at my current university for a course which seems more intricate and exam-based.

    It would be the worst decision I'd ever make in my life if I chose to switch to another university only to find I obtained a 2:2 at the end of it.

    The fact that the LSE course is 90% exam based worries me also. It's a mountain of pressure on your shoulders, but I feel genuinely satisfied with my ability to work well in examinations.

    I despise choices like this, and I thank you for the input. It's great to know that people can evaluate my circumstances and offer solid opinions. At the end of this dilemma it is my choice, but I always find it important to ask for a second opinion (or third...fifth etc.)
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    (Original post by Leondrip)
    I think the main put-off I am suffering with is the view that I may be throwing away good grades at my current university for a course which seems more intricate and exam-based.

    It would be the worst decision I'd ever make in my life if I chose to switch to another university only to find I obtained a 2:2 at the end of it.

    The fact that the LSE course is 90% exam based worries me also. It's a mountain of pressure on your shoulders, but I feel genuinely satisfied with my ability to work well in examinations.

    I despise choices like this, and I thank you for the input. It's great to know that people can evaluate my circumstances and offer solid opinions. At the end of this dilemma it is my choice, but I always find it important to ask for a second opinion (or third...fifth etc.)
    So you'd rather stick at a degree you despise rather than change to a degree you really want to do? Yes it may be a risk, but your grades could fall in second and third year. Thats also a risk.
 
 
 
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