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Will trainee teachers in 2014/15 get a better deal than those in 2013/14? Watch

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    Hi all.

    I've applied for a primary PGCE and have been accepted on to a course starting this September. I have a 2:1 meaning I will receive a £4k bursary.

    With all this talk of teacher shortages, "250k more teachers needed" etc, I'm wondering if the government may introduce extra incentives to get people in to teaching in the next round ie. 2014/15 academic cohort. What happens to us 2013/14 lot if a new bursary (eg. £9k bursary for all, or no fees or something) is introduced for the next year? Will we get anything extra given in retrospect?

    I'm busting a gut to save up for my PGCE year, but am still likely to be an extra £15k in debt. I will be completely mortified if I commit to this course, only to find that, had I waited an extra year, I'd have been in a much more secure financial situation.
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    My 2 cents would be that its more likely they reduce it further or drop it completely like the year before. How old are you? If you're 25 or older you also get over 3k in a maintenance grant (or over 5k on Wales )

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    I might have to defer my PGCE place, or reapply next year, so I really hope it at least stays the same.
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    If anything, it will go down. I can't imagine it going up. They are also looking at changing the entry requirements from a Maths C to a B at GCSE. So they are clearly looking at candidates with a much more academic record, in my opinion. Wouldn't be surprised if they upped the degree level to a 2.1 only. (I know many are anyway)
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    (Original post by pansypotter)
    If anything, it will go down. I can't imagine it going up. They are also looking at changing the entry requirements from a Maths C to a B at GCSE. So they are clearly looking at candidates with a much more academic record, in my opinion. Wouldn't be surprised if they upped the degree level to a 2.1 only. (I know many are anyway)
    I suppose the one thing I'm worried about is that they will increase bursaries to people from better unis, to encourage 'top graduates in to teaching', like they're always banging on about.

    I have a 2:1 from Cambridge and, to be quite honest, find it very frustrating that I get a £4k bursary, while an individual with a 1st in Mickey Mouse studies from a Mickey Mouse Uni will get £9k. It's contradictory.
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    (Original post by missteacher)
    I suppose the one thing I'm worried about is that they will increase bursaries to people from better unis, to encourage 'top graduates in to teaching', like they're always banging on about.

    I have a 2:1 from Cambridge and, to be quite honest, find it very frustrating that I get a £4k bursary, while an individual with a 1st in Mickey Mouse studies from a Mickey Mouse Uni will get £9k. It's contradictory.
    I will get nothing but I am not thinking about the financing so much as I desperately want to teach. Its only a one academic year. In the long run you will be better off with QTS. I personally think you can have the best degree from the best university but that doesn't necessarily mean you will be the best teacher. Yes teaching is academic, but you also need a good balance of empathy and people skills. Therefore, I agree, the bursary thing is completely unfair.
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    (Original post by missteacher)

    I have a 2:1 from Cambridge and, to be quite honest, find it very frustrating that I get a £4k bursary, while an individual with a 1st in Mickey Mouse studies from a Mickey Mouse Uni will get £9k. It's contradictory.
    It sounds like you're suggesting that a 2:1 from Cambridge is worth more than a 2:1, or even a first, from other uni's. It's that kind of 'superiority' attitude that really gets my goat. If someone gets a first class degree then it means they worked goddamn hard no matter where they studied or what the subject.

    So how about everyone who gets a 1st degree or went to Oxbridge gets a 9k bursary.....yeah that seems much less contradictory.
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    (Original post by shellouf)
    It sounds like you're suggesting that a 2:1 from Cambridge is worth more than a 2:1, or even a first, from other uni's. It's that kind of 'superiority' attitude that really gets my goat. If someone gets a first class degree then it means they worked goddamn hard no matter where they studied or what the subject.

    So how about everyone who gets a 1st degree or went to Oxbridge gets a 9k bursary.....yeah that seems much less contradictory.
    You are seriously suggesting that a graduate with a 1st in Furniture Design from De Montford (yes, it exists) is a 'better quality graduate' than I, with a 2:1 in physics from Cambridge?

    I despair.
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    (Original post by shellouf)
    It sounds like you're suggesting that a 2:1 from Cambridge is worth more than a 2:1, or even a first, from other uni's.
    I challenge you to find an employer or institution that DOESN'T think my degree is worth more than those from other unis.

    P.s. Note the lack of apostrophe in 'unis'. I wonder where your degree is from.
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    Your posts in this thread are absolutely disgusting, and it is clear from this thread alone that you're going to be an absolutely terrible teacher. I despair for any pupils or students that have the displeasure of being taught by yourself, or someone equally like you.

    You also seem to be living in a fantasy world where people will praise the ground you walk on for the rest of time simply because you got accepted in to Cambridge. By the time you've completed your PGCE (if you ever do, it seems like you're only in it for the money, so my bets are that you don't even end up doing it because they won't pay you enough to do it *cry/whimper/sniff*), your degree from Cambridge will mean pretty much nothing.

    An undergraduate degree from anywhere means very little once you've been working for a few years. It sounds to me like you're one of those people who think they can get a first from a top 5 university and walk through life like God's gift forever more - I assume you're quite young? Or maybe your extreme naivety is just a huge gaping personality flaw? Either way, the real world doesn't work like that. There are people with 2.1s and 2.2s from Sheffield Hallam and Manchester Met that have been working for years and I can assure you, a 2.1 or 2.2 and X many years of real life working experience is almost always looked upon more favourably than someone who has a first or 2.1 from Cambridge but who's only experience as a grown adult in employment is 3 days they did for work experience.

    Stay bitter, OP.

    Also, LOL @ "Will we get anything extra given in retrospect?". A degree from Cambridge and you ask a question like that. What do you think, oh mighty one? You're unintentionally hilarious.

    A bit embarrassing really.
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    If it's primary, there is very, very little chance that the incentives will increase. It's so difficult to get a job now and there are a surplus of Primary trained teachers. My SIL is a primary teacher and her school received 100 applications for a position that was offered there.

    If you really want to teach, it shouldn't be for the financial incentives.
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    (Original post by missteacher)
    You are seriously suggesting that a graduate with a 1st in Furniture Design from De Montford (yes, it exists) is a 'better quality graduate' than I, with a 2:1 in physics from Cambridge?

    I despair.
    Oh, goodness gracious me! The very idea of someone obtaining a first in Furniture Design and then going on to be a teacher when there are people out there with a 2:1 in Physics, from Cambridge no doubt....how utterly preposterous. Someone please inform the TA about this madness at once. :rolleyes:

    You obviously believe you are somewhat exceptional and more deserving than us mere mortals with a 1st class degree in anything that isn't quite up to your right-wing ideology of what constitutes 'quality'. I find you abhorrent and vile, however your musings are awfully entertaining.

    Please continue with your irrational, elitist, self-satisfied yadda yadda whilst I enjoy my 9k bursary despite my appalling (dahhhling) grammar (this is a chat room not a thesis, if I choose to be lazy with my grammar or use slang or txt spk (oh the horror of it:rolleyes:) it is of no concern at all to you or anyone else), thank you very muchly indeedy.
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    (Original post by missteacher)
    I challenge you to find an employer or institution that DOESN'T think my degree is worth more than those from other unis.

    P.s. Note the lack of apostrophe in 'unis'. I wonder where your degree is from.
    You do have a valid point but your arrogance devalues it somewhat. A candidates primary motive for teaching should be to impart knowledge and inspire the young people that they will be working with, not financial benefit or cashing in your degree. If you carried this superiority complex into an interview then YES perhaps somebody with a mickey mouse degree from Disneyland possibly would be at an advantage over an OxBridge graduate like yourself.

    Back on topic as the number of applications drop then so will the funding that institutions receive so if anything the situation would worsen for 2014/15 trainees.
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    Primary bursaries have always been lower than secondary because more people want to be primary school teachers. There are always more candidates for the course than places, which is why the government channels most of the bursary money they provide into recruiting for the shortage secondary subjects that struggle to fill training places, like the sciences and maths. I very much doubt there'd be an increase in bursaries next year; there might not even be PGCEs in the first place if Gove gets his way!

    Do remember that teaching requires far more emotional than academic intelligence. I very much doubt that you'll be teaching children aged 11 and under anything that you have learned on your degree course, so I'm afraid that Cambridge education will become largely irrelevant as soon as you step into a classroom. Your pupils won't care where you went to university. They'll care about whether you are kind to them, listen to them, make an effort to understand them as individuals, and are able to create exciting and interesting lessons that make them want to learn. As such, your 2:1 Physics degree from Cambridge won't have prepared you any better for the teaching world than someone else's 3rd in Furniture Design from a less illustrious institution.

    You'll look back at the end of your PGCE course and cringe at these comments, trust me. You're very young and very naive and have been told that a Cambridge degree is a passport to success at anything you turn your hand to. Not so, I'm afraid. The true measure of a person is in their character, not their exam certificates. You'll learn that in time.

    Good luck with the PGCE - you'll need it!
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    A Cambridge graduate assuming that universities may abolish fees for the primary PGCE next year? I despair. Do your research.
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    (Original post by missteacher)
    You are seriously suggesting that a graduate with a 1st in Furniture Design from De Montford (yes, it exists) is a 'better quality graduate' than I, with a 2:1 in physics from Cambridge?

    I despair.
    Or, to put it another way, even with some of the best facilities in the world, more individual contact time, and some of the best lecturers in the world you still only managed to get a 2.1. Perhaps you should have worked harder, eh?

    Of course, your entire post is stupid. The De Montfort graduate you are discussing is not interested in teaching nor are they competing with you for a bursary. But the reality is they are comparatively better at their subject than you are at yours. Your desperation is actually laughable.

    The same goes for challenging others to find employers who do not rate your degree as highly as the person from De Montfort. (For what it is worth, I am sure an employer who wants a designer would bin your application and choose the graduate from De Montfort). You are interested in teaching. The Department for Education have said they value a first more than a 2.1 so they have given you less money. Suck it up and get on with your life. If you are looking to blame someone blame yourself for not getting a first, or if money is the only thing that interests you then look at doing a secondary PGCE in physics, or look at one of those employers who would not even look twice at the De Montfort graduate. You could easily walk into any job after all!
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    A teacher especially primary should be a role model to the pupils they teach.

    Your attitude of "I'm from Cambridge hence I am superior " really is not befitting of the role of a teacher.

    Of course in reality you may be a really nice person, basically be careful with what you say.
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    (Original post by missteacher)
    You are seriously suggesting that a graduate with a 1st in Furniture Design from De Montford (yes, it exists) is a 'better quality graduate' than I, with a 2:1 in physics from Cambridge?

    I despair.
    They'd be able to design furniture better than you could be a physicist.
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    The shortages they talk about is mostly in maths and sciences and so incentives may increase in these subjects. However, they are currently doing a big push with advertising and have just changed the GTP to School Direct so have kind of 'done' the changes needed. They have also increased Teach First, almost doubling it reflecting their attempt to get more qualified and better graduates into teaching which Teach First attracts.
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    (Original post by missteacher)
    You are seriously suggesting that a graduate with a 1st in Furniture Design from De Montford (yes, it exists) is a 'better quality graduate' than I, with a 2:1 in physics from Cambridge?

    I despair.
    With an attitude like yours you will be a terrible teacher. If a child asks you about their academic potential, are you going to tell them they're destined to fail and go to a "Mickey Mouse" university and get a rubbish degree? If so, you aren't suitable and I bet there's plenty of graduates from universities lower in the league tables that would make fantastic teachers. Your academic record is far from everything, your attitude and general sociability is also very important.
 
 
 
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