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    So I have firmed sussex and insured UWE for my university choices to study CompSci. I was wondering, seeing as i don't have windows on my laptop whether that would be a huge issue.

    I currently use Open Office for office work and Notepad++ for writing code, so i am wondering whether i may run into any issues using linux at the university.
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    If you're new to Linux, then I would highly recommend using Ubuntu Linux for your computer. It is extremely easy to learn as a first timer. http://www.ubuntu.com/ubuntu

    Or if you're computer is running older hardware (pre-2008) then I would suggest that you use on of ubuntu's lightweight younger brothers. Xubuntu or Lubuntu, they're very similar so whichever screenshots you like best.

    If you're using openoffice for all of your docs work then you'll be pleased to know that linux fully supports OpenOffice.org and the more recent Libre Office which is basically the same thing with more features.

    Notepad++ seems to have not been imported to Linux, however there are other applications that essentially mirror or even surpass its functionality. Programs like GEdit(which comes preinstalled with ubuntu) and also the extremely popular Geany are good alternatives. Source: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7...n-linux-ubuntu

    Installing applications is very easy since ubuntu has an application store, much like something you find at Apple. You can also download packages from the web and install them which are called .deb files which are pretty much where .zip and .exe files have a baby.

    If you don't like the idea of an app store, you can use install apps from the command line if you really want. I find it faster and more straight-forward so I do it this way.

    Connecting to college Wifis is pretty much the same experience and using a Sharepoints are more often than not web based.

    TL;DR: Yes, you'll be fine
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    (Original post by TomWija)
    So I have firmed sussex and insured UWE for my university choices to study CompSci. I was wondering, seeing as i don't have windows on my laptop whether that would be a huge issue.

    I currently use Open Office for office work and Notepad++ for writing code, so i am wondering whether i may run into any issues using linux at the university.
    In my experience it hasn't been an issue at all. In fact it is usually easier to find compilers/etc on Linux.

    Does depend a little on your university's course though - take a look at each of the modules they offer, see which programming language is used, etc.
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    Some universities are more welcoming than others. Where I go, during induction week they gave us some little online tutorials about basic things like connecting to the uni wifi, and that included Windows, OS X and Linux. We also have dedicated Linux (Debian) labs and networking labs that dualboot Windows and Linux.

    As to whether you can get away with OpenOffice is a good question. You'll get power points of the lecture slides which might not display properly if they have things like a lot of auto shapes, but I think it should be fine. Essay writing; yeah you can do that on Writer, but any work submitted digitally (the amount varies from place to place) as a word document (and not say, a PDF) you'd need to check the formatting is correct. I personally have very little to submit online other than programming assignments, so if you've got a printer you could print directly from your Linux machine.

    I can't say for definite that you will, but most unis seem to study Java as a programming language, which you shouldn't have any problem using on Linux, I think nearly all the popular IDEs run on Linux.
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    Get handy with terminal!!
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    Have a look at virtual machines. If your machine is powerful enough, you might be able to run Linux and Windows simultaneously. I use VirtualBox, but the choice of the VM software is yours.
    Also, try the "seamless mode". This allows Windows and Linux desktops to integrate partially and you can do things like opening the college website in Internet Explorer 6 or writing an essay in Word 2007 while programming in the window next to it. Here's a screenshot (not mine, a random one from Google Image Search):
    Name:  seamlessview.jpg
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    EDIT: If you do not have a Windows install disc then you can download the official Windows 7 ISO images directly from Microsoft. They are free and give you a trial period of 30 days, unless you choose to activate the system afterwards. Just search for "Windows 7 official iso download links". The official ISO links should originate from digitalrivercontent.net (apparently the Microsoft's hosting domain for these). PM me if you need more information about this.
 
 
 
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