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How do I get as many A*'s as I can at GCSE? Watch

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    Do any of you guys have advice, we can really help each other
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    Study,,, I guess.
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    (Original post by Future_Dr)
    Study,,, I guess.
    Yh, I know but like revision tips, time scales and basically like how you guys got really good grades
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    Speaking as an old woman with the power of hindsight... Revise. Don't put off revising and don't believe any one who says they aren't bothering because they don't need to or they're too cool for it. For some subjects I found reading and taking in the information helped, for others I write notes and arranged arguments (eg for history).
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    So everyone really does work hard and don't naturally get A*'s
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    CGP is your friend. Do lots of past papers - particularly for subjects like Maths/Science.
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    I don't know about other people, but just make everyday count in terms of learning, just get it all in. Don't get distracted and waste days. Work hard, revise, don't leave it. Start now, go through everything, practice past papers, plan your time and what you're going to do and you'll ace the exams with ease.

    For me, different things worked for different subjects. For content-heavy subjects like History and even Science, coloured notes and reading over them worked for me along with trying out some questions every now and then. For Maths, just lots of practice. Push yourself, and work your way up until you can do the really hard questions.

    After you've been through most the content, do past papers and make sure you know the mark scheme and what they want from you and the exam technique better than the teachers. Examiner's Reports are also good to read, they tell you where students often screw up and can hint at what they might ask to see if students still make the same mistakes.

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    Past papers are so important. For English, history and RS they help you write to time for the exam and learn how to get the technique just right. For maths and science, they're good because sometimes the questions you do in class are easier than the exam questions, and the new spec for science seems to be rather difficult and pedantic with answers.
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    You know that little thing called procrastination? Take that outside, beat the fluffbuckets out of it and leave it in the dust Do past papers regularly and keep revising until your past paper grades rise.
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    (Original post by Biggers98)
    Yh, I know but like revision tips, time scales and basically like how you guys got really good grades
    I would say, the hardest thing any of us can do is teach a revision method (as everyone's is different, pick the method that works for YOU the best.) (e.g. if you're a visual learner, try using mind maps/flash-cards, if you're an auditory learner try listening to podcasts).

    If you're wondering what other people's method of revision is, I'll share mine:

    I sit down, with a text book, put 40 minutes on timer (this is important as you don't want to over-cram your brain with crap), I then proceed to note down anything of relevance from the textbook and/or revision guide. I then close the book, and attempt to write down all the detail in compressed form onto one side of paper (however, if there are diagrams or a lot of information, I go onto 2 pages). If I've still got time left, I go onto another topic and do the same as above, but at the end I try and write down the detail from that topic AND the previous topic I studied.

    After, I take a break. (As I stated above, this is important as you don't want to over-stress yourself).

    Other tips I can give you are:

    - Do Past Papers (They'll help you get a feel for what the examiner really wants)
    - Try and get a CGP revision guide for the subject in question (as they offer all the information, presented in a concise and humorous way).

    These are just a few tips that I can offer you

    Hope I helped.
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    (Original post by Biggers98)
    Do any of you guys have advice, we can really help each other
    1) Organised revision! This I cannot stress enough. The last thing you want is to be searching for your notes last minute. Last year, I remember buying a large lever arch file with many dividers so each subject had its own slot. When it came to revision this made life sooooo much easier. So I would say organisation= efficient revision!

    2) Do past papers! Another must if you want A*s. I would say that the optimum would be 5 but you can do so much more to make your technique even better One thing that will ensure you success in exams is if you harness your exam technique (particularly for essay subjects e.g. English or History)

    3) Pay close attention to examiner reports They give really useful advice/tips from examiners so you are aware of what they are looking for. The exact sme applies to mark schemes, particularly for essay subjects, STUDY THEM!

    4) I would suggest that you vary your revision. Don't just stick to writing pages and pages of notes (trust me, this will get boring) but create flash cards, PowerPoint presentations, mindmaps, flow charts and make them really colourful. This will make facts a lot easier to remember.

    So that's it I suppose, this is what I would strongly recommend If you need further advice then feel free to inbox me

    Good luck!
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    I never did much revision for GCSE's, but I'd say look at past papers and mark schemes to see what the common mistakes are and how to avoid them
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    (Original post by xMr_BrightSide)
    I never did much revision for GCSE's, but I'd say look at past papers and mark schemes to see what the common mistakes are and how to avoid them
    Sorry to be correcting you, but I think you mean the examiner reports :cool: As they say where most candidates done well, and where they did not do so well.
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    Thank you so much guys this has really helped but I'm just wondering how to kick out procrastination it's a real bugger :mad: how did you guys do it
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    (Original post by tohaaaa)
    Sorry to be correcting you, but I think you mean the examiner reports :cool: As they say where most candidates done well, and where they did not do so well.
    Oh yeah, those as well
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    Do ALL the past papers, especially for definite right/wrong subjects like maths and science, because then you can mark them yourself.
    I was on OCR B for science and I literally did every paper, January and June, for all three sciences from 2008 to 2012, and I got A* in all three. I really couldn't have done it without all that practice though!
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    Real life advice - GCSEs don't matter THAT much. Not getting 14 A* grades at GCSE isn't going to affect you. You'll still do well if you have 1 or 2 B/C grades. Hell, I got ONE C at GCSE and 8 other grades below that (5 Ds, 2 Es and an F) and I'm working at DDD level in my BTEC, which is the same as AAA. Point is, I still managed to achieve what I wanted without amazing GCSE grades. I have a mate who got 14 A* at GCSE, 4 A* at A-Level is currently on track for a first in biomedical science. He's a bright guy, but he doesn't socialise that much. He'll have still got on to his degree without his 14 A* at GCSE and 4 A* at A-level.

    Not saying don't try, I'm saying schools make out they're the most important thing you'll ever do, and they're not. As long as you meet your A-level conditions for college/6th Form, then you're fine.

    Same reason some employers don't employ graduates with a really high degree percentage mark - it shows they're academically bright, sure, but they have poor social skills (usually) because they spent so long in their room they didn't socialise.
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    For Maths/Science/RE and Geography (?)
    1) Do you understand all of your content? If there are areas that you feel bad on, REVISE IT. If there are areas that you feel just "okay" on, REVISE IT. Get all that information in NOW. This includes answering questions from the text book.
    2) Get as many past exam papers and questions as possible. I used this site for my A-Level resources and was able to get past Chemistry and Biology examination questions that were still relevant to the current syllabus.
    3) Do each of them one by one and mark them.
    4) Any areas you goofed up on? Kick yourself for it, then do it again. Aim for 100% at all times (never hurts to have a little ambition ). Rinse and repeat.
    5) Crush the pathetic excuse of exams they will give to you over the next 2-3 months.
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    (Original post by CodeJack)
    You know that little thing called procrastination? Take that outside, beat the fluffbuckets out of it and leave it in the dust Do past papers regularly and keep revising until your past paper grades rise.
    Past papers have helped me so much with AS biology, sometimes what I think is too obvious to mention is worth a mark or missing out silly words costs me!

    (Original post by Biggers98)
    Thank you so much guys this has really helped but I'm just wondering how to kick out procrastination it's a real bugger :mad: how did you guys do it
    I never did, I didn't revise for GCSEs then wondered why I didn't get those straight As I was predicted! Just be really strict with yourself I suppose, now I'm paying to study I do get more into it, sometimes I want to pick up a book and do some revision, others I can force myself and get into it but at the same time when I'm not feeling it I don't do it because I stress myself too much with me working full time as well. I'm assuming if you're doing GCSEs you're still at school so make the most of not having to split your focus.
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    Treat your study leave/holidays as normal school days. In other words, revise at least 4 hours a day, aiming for 5 or 6 (but don't feel down if you don't reach your aim, you need to rest as well!)
    Also, I REALLY recommend you put all distractions such as phones, laptops or iPods in a place where you wont be tempted to use them. During breaks, keep your brain active by reading a book or magazine, and use your phone etc. as a reward for when you finish your aim for the day-you only get to use it once you're done.
 
 
 
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