Join TSR now and get answers to all your questions about uniSign up now
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am currently a second year Aerospace Engineering student, and right now, I am seriously considering applying for Graduate Entry Medicine after I graduate from my current engineering course.

    To put it simply, engineering hasn't turned out to be what I thought it was going to be even after several open days before deciding on engineering. I am not suffering academically from the degree, as I am still obtaining 60-87% in my modules, but it just isn't what I want for my future.

    My childhood dreams were 1) Airline Pilot/Aerospace Engineer 2) A doctor, in that specific order. The doctor dream has never truly been cemented as a potential career choice because of my slightly above average grades (Bs) from never actually studying during GCSEs and A Levels (Biggest regrets in my life!), and I know how competitive Medicine is, requiring all A grades etc. So I never thought much about it.

    But now I am in this dilemma... SHOULD I TRY FOR GEM?

    There is no doubt that I will finish off the degree first, but should I actually even bother thinking about a graduate entry medicine degree? I will of course try my hardest to obtain a first class from the engineering degree to make up for all the slacking I did in my teenage years, but I'm still not too sure whether I seriously want to put myself into a Medicine degree for another 4+ years...

    Maybe the best thing to do now is try to get some voluntary work/work experience this summer at a health centre/hospital to help me decide whether medicine is actually for me? Whilst also doing at least an AS Level in Biology?

    Any help would be highly appreciated.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    You answered your question yourself. You need to get some work experience and think about it a bit more. Obvious question, but why do you think Medicine won't turn out just the same as your current degree? Are you sure you're not just having a 'grass is greener' moment? The order you put your dream careers even now suggests you'd rather stay with Engineering and find a niche that suits you. Especially if you're really not feeling another four years' study.

    You need to check out the GEM course requirements at different unis. If you already have A-level Chemistry then AS Biology is probably going to be unnecessary in terms of opening up many more med schools to you, there are already plenty you can go for (I think).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ronove)
    You answered your question yourself. You need to get some work experience and think about it a bit more. Obvious question, but why do you think Medicine won't turn out just the same as your current degree? Are you sure you're not just having a 'grass is greener' moment? The order you put your dream careers even now suggests you'd rather stay with Engineering and find a niche that suits you. Especially if you're really not feeling another four years' study.

    You need to check out the GEM course requirements at different unis. If you already have A-level Chemistry then AS Biology is probably going to be unnecessary in terms of opening up many more med schools to you, there are already plenty you can go for (I think).
    Thank you for the reply Ronove. In all honesty, I can't answer the 2 questions you asked. I really don't know whether Medicine will turn out just the same as my current degree, so I think it definitely is worthwhile for me to try to get some work experience to help me answer this. (One of my old A-Level friends did voluntary work at a hospital, but apparently all he ever did was take blood samples from patients?)

    I didn't take Chemistry at A-Level. I did A-Levels in Mathematics, Physics, Business, ICT.

    I've looked into GEM course requirements and there are quite a few universities which I'd want to apply to:

    Barts and The London/QMUL - Degree classification 2:1 and 'B' in AS Biology

    King's College London - Degree classification 2:1

    St. George's - Degree classification 2.2

    Warwick - Degree classification 2:1

    I plan on trying to use my free time this Summer to see whether Medicine is for me. Would you think trying to get experience with my GP and local hospital be enough to help me decide whether Medicine really is for me?

    Another problem I am worried about is how much tougher is a medicine degree is compared to an Aerospace Engineering degree... :rolleyes:

    Lastly, IF Medicine does turn out to be something I really want to do after hopefully a Summer of work experience, would it be best to apply for 2014 entry? Or should I wait to complete my degree first? I ask because I'm worried that I might not have the time to worry about my application and go to interviews etc whilst doing my finals.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ...CoNfUsEd...)
    Thank you for the reply Ronove. In all honesty, I can't answer the 2 questions you asked. I really don't know whether Medicine will turn out just the same as my current degree, so I think it definitely is worthwhile for me to try to get some work experience to help me answer this. (One of my old A-Level friends did voluntary work at a hospital, but apparently all he ever did was take blood samples from patients?)

    I didn't take Chemistry at A-Level. I did A-Levels in Mathematics, Physics, Business, ICT.

    I've looked into GEM course requirements and there are quite a few universities which I'd want to apply to:

    Barts and The London/QMUL - Degree classification 2:1 and 'B' in AS Biology

    King's College London - Degree classification 2:1

    St. George's - Degree classification 2.2

    Warwick - Degree classification 2:1

    I plan on trying to use my free time this Summer to see whether Medicine is for me. Would you think trying to get experience with my GP and local hospital be enough to help me decide whether Medicine really is for me?

    Another problem I am worried about is how much tougher is a medicine degree is compared to an Aerospace Engineering degree... :rolleyes:

    Lastly, IF Medicine does turn out to be something I really want to do after hopefully a Summer of work experience, would it be best to apply for 2014 entry? Or should I wait to complete my degree first? I ask because I'm worried that I might not have the time to worry about my application and go to interviews etc whilst doing my finals.
    You'll most likely need more than just shadowing experience to get into GEM but it should be enough for you to work out whether you want to apply or not. Unis also like to see (ideally longer term) voluntary caring work - such as at old people's homes, hospices, centres for disabled people/children, etc. Also, don't be surprised if your GP says no to you re. shadowing. They're usually unwilling to let people from the immediate area (let alone their own practice) shadow, because of the likelihood of bumping into people you know (patient comfort/confidentiality issues). Try a few miles further out.

    Unless your friend happened to be somehow qualified in healthcare I can't imagine what they were doing that involved taking blood was 'voluntary work' as such.

    The consensus on the difficulty of a medical degree is that it involves a lot of concepts, but not overly complex ones. It should be fine if you're doing OK on your current degree. Unless of course you're absolutely dreadful at time management and can't improve on that early on in the course.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ...CoNfUsEd...)
    x
    Some courses will require you to have chemistry knowledge up to about AS standard, either from your degree or from doing A-levels.

    If you do decide to apply, make sure you contact individual universities to confirm you meet their requirements before you apply!
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ...CoNfUsEd...)
    (One of my old A-Level friends did voluntary work at a hospital, but apparently all he ever did was take blood samples from patients?)

    Would you think trying to get experience with my GP and local hospital be enough to help me decide whether Medicine really is for me?
    (
    If you think "all he ever did was take blood" then you've missed the point. He had direct patient contact, he spoke to patients and therefore developed good communication skills, supported them through a procedure that most people find a little nerve-wracking, he learned why patients find being a patient quite scary and how to reassure them, showed technical skills and an understanding of healthcare protocols in infection control and safety, gained a wider understanding of how healthcare works from being in that environment working alongside doctors and nurses... I could go on but I'm sure you get the point. There are a lot of relatively simple tasks in healthcare that have a much wider learning context.

    Ronove's given you a lot of good advice. Get long term voluntary work alongside your degree in a nursing home, hospital, hospice, etc, as well as arranging shadowing placements. You need to figure out whether medicine is actually what you think it is as well as whether you're suited to it, so you need to combine seeing what a doctor does with experiencing being in a patient-facing role.
 
 
 
Poll
Which Fantasy Franchise is the best?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.