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    I currently rent a house at uni so hall restrictions wouldn't be a problem. I really want a fish (probably a tropical one) and can afford the upkeep but not sure if it would be a hassle during holidays and stuff.

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    If the hall restrictions allow to keep a fish and you can manage the sustenance even in your holidays - ask fellow students whether they are able to do it in your absence -, then I would advice you to get an one.
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    If you want one. A fish is the easiest pet ever so why not - I'd get two though.


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    If you want to have fishes, you must merely feed them and clean the aquarium. Plus you should make sure that they get enough oxygen (obtain a pump).
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    Sure Why not...!
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    I'd say no, unless you'll be there all the time to feed them and maintain them properly. I love fish, but too many people get them as an 'easy' pet and end up killing them after 6 miserable months in unsuitable conditions having not looked after them properly. It's actually quite time-consuming sometimes.

    If you'll be going home for the holidays I wouldn't bother, but if you'll be there all the time then why not.
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    (Original post by russellsteapot)
    I'd say no, unless you'll be there all the time to feed them and maintain them properly. I love fish, but too many people get them as an 'easy' pet and end up killing them after 6 miserable months in unsuitable conditions having not looked after them properly. It's actually quite time-consuming sometimes.

    If you'll be going home for the holidays I wouldn't bother, but if you'll be there all the time then why not.
    I agree with this, of all my pets the fish require the most upkeep. Many people keep them in massively cramped conditions, for example goldfish in those little bowls, they don't filter water or ensure that ammonia and nitrate levels are suitable.
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    (Original post by russellsteapot)
    I'd say no, unless you'll be there all the time to feed them and maintain them properly. I love fish, but too many people get them as an 'easy' pet and end up killing them after 6 miserable months in unsuitable conditions having not looked after them properly. It's actually quite time-consuming sometimes.

    If you'll be going home for the holidays I wouldn't bother, but if you'll be there all the time then why not.
    This^ not me but my house mates got some goldfish they had nowhere to hide so they were stressed and were in the coldest room in the house no wonder they died. Although I did my best leaving fish care leaflets around which seemed to annoy the girls a bit so I stopped and it was all ok again but still.
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    (Original post by russellsteapot)
    I'd say no, unless you'll be there all the time to feed them and maintain them properly. I love fish, but too many people get them as an 'easy' pet and end up killing them after 6 miserable months in unsuitable conditions having not looked after them properly. It's actually quite time-consuming sometimes.

    If you'll be going home for the holidays I wouldn't bother, but if you'll be there all the time then why not.
    I agree with this so much. Fish are beautiful and complex creatures. They bring a lot of joy when cared for properly, but I see far too many people killing their fish. If you're there all the time they make amazing pets and are very good at relieving stress!

    Some things to consider before you get fish that most people don't know / think about:

    1) You're going to have to cycle your tank before you put any fish in it. If you don't know what cycling is already, this is a good place to start : http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.u...t.php?sid=2491

    2) There is chemistry involved. Make sure your water quality is right before you put any fish in. You'll probably want to invest in a water test kit.

    3) Think carefully about what kind of fish you want, and set up your tank accordingly. Remember that big fish need big tanks. Some fish need particularly deep or shallow water. Others need brackish conditions. Don't ever impulse buy a fish. Research the kinds you want to keep and go into shops looking for those particular fish. Platys are especially good for a beginner, they're very hardy and are livebearers, so they'll probably repopulate your tank of their own accord for many years. I'd also recommend a small group of any of the corydoras family, they keep the tank nice and clean, are fun to watch and are very long-lived.

    4) Fish are an investment. These are not necessarily cheap pets. A group of algae-eating catfish (one of my favourite ways to populate small tanks) can cost around £40 and up. A water test kit comes in at about £30 usually. A good filter doesn't come that cheaply either. That said, the ongoing costs (if you're doing stuff right) should be minimal, since you'll just be paying the electricity costs, any medication, the cost of replenishing aquarium plants and a small amount for food. Know what you're getting into and you'll be fine.

    5) Fish are long term. Livebearers like platys may only live 2 years or so, but a well-kept catfish can potentially live 5 times that, and a goldfish even longer. These are not a pet to be taken lightly. Consider before you get them what you will do if and when you have to move. They aren't the easiest pets to move about.

    6) Small tanks - anything about 20 gallons and under - are almost always more work than big tanks in my experience. This doesn't have to be the case, if you do your research well and know what you're getting into. Go slow and everything will be fine.

    Fish are incredible and a lot of fun, but can also be pretty stressful when things all go wrong. The most important thing in my opinion is: do your research first. I'd strongly recommend reading a lot of stuff on Practical Fishkeeping's website (they're one of the best publications on the subject in my opinion) If you know exactly what you want and what you're getting into, fishkeeping is a really great hobby. I've kept nano tanks for more than a decade and hope to get another tank in the near-ish future because, well, I'm addicted.

    If you do decide to get fish, I wish you the best of luck with it. They're amazing, you'll have so much fun!!
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    Fish are so awesome and relaxing to look at imo, I have 2 goldfish right now

    I would suggest hardier fish, such as goldfish, are better than Siamese Fighter fish because they'll be able to stand colder weather, and it's usually better to buy a larger fish tank too x
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    http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-...ter-a-goldfish
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    I'm getting fish tonight...

    mmm fish and chips
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    Yes, a one pound fish!
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    (Original post by Mouse Potato)
    I agree with this so much. Fish are beautiful and complex creatures. They bring a lot of joy when cared for properly, but I see far too many people killing their fish. If you're there all the time they make amazing pets and are very good at relieving stress!

    Some things to consider before you get fish that most people don't know / think about:

    1) You're going to have to cycle your tank before you put any fish in it. If you don't know what cycling is already, this is a good place to start : http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.u...t.php?sid=2491

    2) There is chemistry involved. Make sure your water quality is right before you put any fish in. You'll probably want to invest in a water test kit.

    3) Think carefully about what kind of fish you want, and set up your tank accordingly. Remember that big fish need big tanks. Some fish need particularly deep or shallow water. Others need brackish conditions. Don't ever impulse buy a fish. Research the kinds you want to keep and go into shops looking for those particular fish. Platys are especially good for a beginner, they're very hardy and are livebearers, so they'll probably repopulate your tank of their own accord for many years. I'd also recommend a small group of any of the corydoras family, they keep the tank nice and clean, are fun to watch and are very long-lived.

    4) Fish are an investment. These are not necessarily cheap pets. A group of algae-eating catfish (one of my favourite ways to populate small tanks) can cost around £40 and up. A water test kit comes in at about £30 usually. A good filter doesn't come that cheaply either. That said, the ongoing costs (if you're doing stuff right) should be minimal, since you'll just be paying the electricity costs, any medication, the cost of replenishing aquarium plants and a small amount for food. Know what you're getting into and you'll be fine.

    5) Fish are long term. Livebearers like platys may only live 2 years or so, but a well-kept catfish can potentially live 5 times that, and a goldfish even longer. These are not a pet to be taken lightly. Consider before you get them what you will do if and when you have to move. They aren't the easiest pets to move about.

    6) Small tanks - anything about 20 gallons and under - are almost always more work than big tanks in my experience. This doesn't have to be the case, if you do your research well and know what you're getting into. Go slow and everything will be fine.

    Fish are incredible and a lot of fun, but can also be pretty stressful when things all go wrong. The most important thing in my opinion is: do your research first. I'd strongly recommend reading a lot of stuff on Practical Fishkeeping's website (they're one of the best publications on the subject in my opinion) If you know exactly what you want and what you're getting into, fishkeeping is a really great hobby. I've kept nano tanks for more than a decade and hope to get another tank in the near-ish future because, well, I'm addicted.

    If you do decide to get fish, I wish you the best of luck with it. They're amazing, you'll have so much fun!!
    The above is a great post.. I started keeping fish at the age of 10 (though had to give it up before moving away to university ) and they're actually a hell of a lot more work (and money!) than people tend to realise. Tropical fish are generally harder than cold-water because it's just one more thing that can easily go wrong. It's not just getting a glass container, sticking some water in it and putting the fish in as some tend to think. Fish can be surprisingly highly-strung - if the water quality/temperature/food/environment/oxygenation/shoal size/other species in the tank aren't quite right they may well just die on you.

    So by all means go for it, but do thorough research and make sure you know what you;re doing before you start! If you talk to people in the pet shop/aquarists when you go in and mention that you're looking to start your first tank, they should be able to give you some decent advice.
 
 
 
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