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    Basically as the title says.

    Preferably opinions from graduates,

    is it better to do a course which you enjoy, but may not thrive in career opportunities

    or do a course which is ok, maybe a bit boring, but will be worth it regarding the economic situation in that it is so hard to get a job?

    any grads who wished they'd done what they'd enjoyed, or vice versa, are stuck without the job they wanted to pursue and wished they'd just done a degree which would get them a job?

    hate how the way it is in that some degrees are just so hard to make a career of. harsh reality

    any opinions/comments appreciated as i'm stuck between courses! thankyou x
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    Is it too much to ask for both?

    Ultimately it will be your final grade that matters more than the subject (though that's something of a generalisation). If you do something you enjoy, you'll do better at it.
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    As an animation student (I start final year in October), my degree is practically worthless without a professional show reel and portfolio, no matter what final grade I get. What I have to remember about a degree is that it is not an instant ticket to any job, it is mainly academia and may help me get a better chance of getting a career.
    I live in Wigan, definitely not animation capital of the world, and many people told me that drawing is useless in today's society because we are so technology reliant and nobody cares about artistic careers. But I chose animation because I am passionate about it and before I started, I knew that I could walk away with a degree and no job. I enjoy what I do and as a result, I worked hard and am currently on a 1st. Chances are that this time next year I will be signing on the dole but I can still take pride in having done something I am passionate about and done the best.
    Connections are a vitality also, they've helped me a ton. A degree is what you make of it in my opinion. Mine hasn't all been hunky dory, there some stuff I loved learning about and was extremely helpful whereas some I was sitting there thinking "this has absolutely naff all to do with animation." (We had a lecture on how Lady Gaga is a symbol of postmodernist culture and I truthfully couldn't care less, I wanted to learn more about being a good animator.)
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    I think if you don't enjoy a vocation-specific degree, you probably won't enjoy spending the next 40 years doing the job you get from it. If you hate law, for example, and find it tedious, you probably don't want to be doing a law degree followed by working in the legal profession. If you hate medical stuff, a medicine degree followed by 40 years of being a doctor isn't going to be very enjoyable. You'll also be less successful on a course you don't like.

    I'd personally prefer to do something I enjoy, even if it's less profitable or directly applicable to work. My dream would be a job I actually enjoy doing, rather than a job I'm just doing to get money, but in reality I'd be happy with a job I don't mind over a job I hate. The majority of jobs are not degree-specific anyway, so doing something you enjoy (and getting a higher grade) may well benefit you in the long run anyway. A 1st is a 1st a lot of the time, it's only when you apply for specific jobs that you might 'need' a degree in a certain subject.

    Some people are different, and just want pure employability in a specific field, or a 'reputable' subject on their CV, and might do something they don't really enjoy to achieve this. A friend of mine did maths for this reason and is now re-training to become a nurse, because that's ultimately what she wanted to do all along. But other people become very successful by having a strong-looking subject on their CV.

    The economy is likely to change over time, so there's no guarantee that what is desired in the economy now will be especially useful in a decade anyway. I've spent the last 7 years doing a job I increasingly dislike (and am still doing it part time), which pays well and is 'respectable'. I went back to university last year to do something I enjoy because I couldn't face another 30 unfulfilling years of what I was doing.

    In the end it's an individual choice though. I probably won't be paid as much in my new career (until much later) but I'm happy with that because I'll actually enjoy it. Other people might prefer the money and security.
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    A mixture of the two I'd say
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    Is it better to have fun, or earn lots of money?

    Not that the two are mutually exclusive, but enjoyment should always place before blind riches.

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    You should go for a balance between the 2. Consider what you'd like to do with the rest of your life. If that would need a specific degree then go for it. If you would just need a good grade in a degree then select your degree basew on what you'd enjoy studying most. It's a lot easier to study what you are interested in.
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    it depends OP, how much more do you enjoy one of the course over the other?

    not much? then I'd pick the one that would give you better job prospects

    its tough but you just have to judge whether its worth sacrificing 'x' amount of enjoyment for 'y' amount of job prospect
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    (Original post by 1ne)
    Is it better to have fun, or earn lots of money?

    Not that the two are mutually exclusive, but enjoyment should always place before blind riches.


    I liked that,quiet motivational.

    I really want to be a doctor,but dont wna do the 5year med degree ,im not even arsed about the pay or the whole hype around how reputable etc it is.But i really love the variety it entails

    I just want a degree with biological sciences within in it,around 10% chem a tiny bit of easy maths ,some psychology and some of english language in it and then, 2years max at uni.thats all i can put up with tbh!
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    For me it would have to be something I would love doing.


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    I really know where you are coming from, I had a dilemma over two courses I wanted to do and Its such a tough decision. I suppose it depends on what makes you happy, would having good money be worth enduring a boring job? Or would being happy be worth not having a good job and loads of money? It's a personal decision but to make my decision I wrote down pros and cons of both courses and took it from there


    Hope this helps!
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    A mixture of the two is ideal. I read Law, Politics, and Philosophy. Enjoyed it, but it's great knowing that having Law as my major could open doors outside of the Law profession.

    If you are going to spend years studying for something, and paying a lot of money for it, you might as well enjoy it, and get a decent return on what is essentially an investment!
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    I think people forget sometimes that a life is supposed to be lived.
    A lot of people get caught up in this way of living where they think they have to get a crappy job with long hours and low pay like everyone else just to earn a decent living.

    Honestly though don't do something you don't enjoy. its simple.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandsty...s-of-the-dying - This is an article on the top five regrets of elderly people coming to the end of their life. See for yourself!
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    thankyou so so much for all your replies!
    in regards to what some people are saying, its not between money and enjoyment for a job i have the dilemma about [ i would pick enjoyment over money like most of you], its just the actual degree, whether i should do law and French, although i don't want to be a lawyer, because it will 'open a lot of doors' or English and French, which will be a much less boring degree to me but [i guess depending a lot on contacts/timing/experience etc] it doesn't seem to have as much career prospects as law.
    do i endure a four year degree in order to have the better chances of a job, or do what i'd rather study.. is more my query.
    i'm in Scotland, so fees doesn't make much of a difference.
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    I presume if you do a course you do not enjoy, you are less likely to do well in it and then less likely to get job?

    Do something you enjoy, after all that's all that should matter in life! too many people getting stressed over what are essentially socially constructed goals that mean nothing in reality
 
 
 
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