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Thoughts on what the future holds for the mechanical and Aeronautical Industries Watch

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    When i was deciding whether to study mechanical or aeronautical engineering, one of the significant factors in my decision to go for Aeronautical in the end was a conversation i had with my water polo coach who was a mech engineer for 35 years.

    He held the view that the mechanical industry in the future will become dated with electronic engineering playing a more prominent role, whereas the aeronautical industry is always adapting and innovating.

    anyone have any views on the future of these 2 industries?
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    The government invested £2Bn in aerospace so I'm not too worried about the career prospects in the coming years.

    I have no professional verdict on the rise of electronic engineering, but there will always be a need for those in the "mechanical" fields to actually create the structures for the electronics to go onto. There can't be a purely electrical society, there has to be "stuff" in it too.
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    What is the "mechanical industry"?
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    Why do you think mechanical engineering is going to suffer?
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    (Original post by Pinkhead)
    Why do you think mechanical engineering is going to suffer?
    Personally, i couldn't know for sure which is partly why im asking this question but i have certainly noticed that mechanical systems are being replaced by electronic systems e.g. mechanical flight control systems in planes are being replaced by "fly by wire" systems but that's a minute example.

    And with regards to what i mean by the mechanical industry, i mean the manufacturing and maintenance of mechanical systems, e.g. factory machinery, components for things like automotives etc.
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    (Original post by Tim Mc.)
    Personally, i couldn't know for sure which is partly why im asking this question but i have certainly noticed that mechanical systems are being replaced by electronic systems e.g. mechanical flight control systems in planes are being replaced by "fly by wire" systems but that's a minute example.

    And with regards to what i mean by the mechanical industry, i mean the manufacturing and maintenance of mechanical systems, e.g. factory machinery, components for things like automotives etc.
    there's always going to be a need for mechanical engineers. How would you build those planes? Who would manage the supply chains? Who would ensure engines are working at optimum levels? Who would invent mechanical platforms for different ideologies?

    mechanical engineers will be in demand. You're thinking about it on a small scale.
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    (Original post by a10)
    there's always going to be a need for mechanical engineers. How would you build those planes? Who would manage the supply chains? Who would ensure engines are working at optimum levels? Who would invent mechanical platforms for different ideologies?

    mechanical engineers will be in demand. You're thinking about it on a small scale.
    I see what you're saying and i agree that you cant get rid of mechanical engineers altogether, they are essential for many things, but do you think mechanical engineering is beginning to lack in innovation because a lot of what we know about mechanical engineering, we've known for a long time
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    (Original post by Tim Mc.)
    I see what you're saying and i agree that you cant get rid of mechanical engineers altogether, they are essential for many things, but do you think mechanical engineering is beginning to lack in innovation because a lot of what we know about mechanical engineering, we've known for a long time
    what makes you say that? Aerospace/Aeronautical is just a more specialized version of mechanical engineering. The principles may be old and they may have been known for a long time but they are definitely being adapted to meet todays technology and also create the next new innovations hence the research being done by a number of institutions. Therefore what you are getting taught now is up to date with todays technology and provides you with skills to be able to create new ideas.

    so many industries in the future will rely on the basic engineering principles aero/civil/mechanical/electrical and chemical. For example new designs of planes are being made to reduce fuel consumption and increase power outputs, another example in the automotive industry electric/hybrid cars are being engineered, new types of buildings that are self sustainable etc.
 
 
 
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