Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Many people will already know I'm not happy with my job. People treat me like a mute idiot, there is no support, training or any form of buddy system. I am incredibly unhappy and I'm sure the job isn't for me.

    I am left in a terrible situation. I want to go, come home and job hunt, but i have no time to do so. I'm depressed all the time and the 12 hour day is unbearable, door to door.

    It can't just be me feeling like this! I feel utterly alone and defeated at work and genuinely afraid of asking about trivial questions. If i leave, how likely will it affect future employment?

    I've been there for over two months and i dislike both the work and the environment. What can i do? Sticking it out doesn't feel like an option anymore.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    Many people will already know I'm not happy with my job. People treat me like a mute idiot, there is no support, training or any form of buddy system. I am incredibly unhappy and I'm sure the job isn't for me.

    I am left in a terrible situation. I want to go, come home and job hunt, but i have no time to do so. I'm depressed all the time and the 12 hour day is unbearable, door to door.

    It can't just be me feeling like this! I feel utterly alone and defeated at work and genuinely afraid of asking about trivial questions. If i leave, how likely will it affect future employment?

    I've been there for over two months and i dislike both the work and the environment. What can i do? Sticking it out doesn't feel like an option anymore.
    It will be pretty disastrous if you show you can't stick it- particularly if you have an extended stint of unemployment on top.

    I suspect you know this, though.

    Sticking it out IS an option, it's just one you're choosing not to consider now.

    Edit:

    Just read you've been there only two months... MAN UP.

    Everyone struggles for the first few months- it takes time to grow into the role and the team when nobody will hold your hand.

    Stick it out until Christmas and then see how you feel. To quit now really would be a disaster.
    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    With nothing lined up and two months into the job, I will definitely stick it out for a bit....not only is it early stages but if you leave and try to find another job, it would look horrible to the person interviewing you after leaving a job in 2 months...

    What are you doing right now by the way? What position (of course don't name the company) and what makes you hate it about from the people side? To a certain degree I thought that graduate schemes were suppose to fast track you so no training etc sounds weird

    Are you sure there is 100% no scope for change because I'm sure you know just how hard it is to get a job right now....
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Not ideal, but only you can know what's best for you in this situation. It's not career ending to change your mind early on, nobody truely knows a position until they're in it.

    Consider though that quitting without another job is a last resort, plenty of options before that. You could speak to someone relatively senior at work and explain you're not happy with the current opportunities for example - nothing to lose from that if the alternative is to quit. Similarly, if you know you want out and want time to apply elsewhere in the evenings, then simply take it. Work your contracted day (8 hours?) and then leave. You won't get a promotion, but there's sod all they can do to you for not working overtime.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by M1011)
    Not ideal, but only you can know what's best for you in this situation. It's not career ending to change your mind early on, nobody truely knows a position until they're in it.

    Consider though that quitting without another job is a last resort, plenty of options before that. You could speak to someone relatively scenior at work and explain you're not happy with the current opportunities for example - nothing to lose from that if the alternative is to quit. Similarly, if you know you want out and want time to apply elsewhere in the evenings, then simply take it. Work your contracted day (8 hours?) and then leave. You won't get a promotion, but there's sod all they can do to you for not working overtime.
    I'm not sure advising remedial action is the best when it's highly likely OP is simply suffering from the culture shock of real full time work and isn't adjusted to the role.

    2-8 months is the hardest part in grad jobs. It is after the initial buzz has work off and before they really feel settled in their position.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LexiswasmyNexis)
    I'm not sure advising remedial action is the best when it's highly likely OP is simply suffering from the culture shock of real full time work and isn't adjusted to the role.

    2-8 months is the hardest part in grad jobs. It is after the initial buzz has work off and before they really feel settled in their position.
    Possible, maybe even likely, only the OP can know really. Twelve hour days aren't exactly the norm, and some people (quite rightly IMO!) value a work life balance very highly. He may simply not be suited to the culture or the type of work, after all unless a student has done very relevant work experience, taking any graduate position is just sticking a foot out in the dark and hoping you land somewhere you like really!

    Either way, I was just trying to point out there are some strong alternatives to consider if things are so bad he is literally going to resign. Not necessarily the best course of action though!
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by M1011)
    Possible, maybe even likely, only the OP can know really. Twelve hour days aren't exactly the norm, and some people (quite rightly IMO!) value a work life balance very highly. He may simply not be suited to the culture or the type of work, after all unless a student has done very relevant work experience, taking any graduate position is just sticking a foot out in the dark and hoping you land somewhere you like really!

    Either way, I was just trying to point out there are some strong alternatives to consider if things are so bad he is literally going to resign. Not necessarily the best course of action though!
    Tbh I think this is an occasion where OP may not know best


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    In the current climate leaving a job without one to go to can be a disaster. Some employers automatically reject applications from those not currently in employment. I fully understand where you are coming from, I've been there and been miserable in a job but it's best to stick it out until you have found something else.

    To make your remaining time there bearable make your escape plan. Plan job hunting into your day a little on working days and more on your days off. try and work out a development plan for your current job, ie things you feel you need to learn to make it more bearable and where possible have suggestions on how to learn them. Approach someone senior to you at work with this, it should look OK when you are also suggesting a solution. It will also stand you in good stead when you are applying for other jobs when you can present it as an example of problem solving, commitment to development etc.

    Good luck and I hope you are feeling happier soon.

    Like to add try and get fresh air every day and get out in daylight when you can, it can help your mood.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    It's a tough one. If you are really unhappy and you can afford not to work while you look, that may be a good plan. But employers will notice that you've had a short period of employment, and question why you left etc. Even so, having a two month period of employment could raise eyebrows - you may need to think about how you will explain that.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by novadragon849)
    What are you doing right now by the way? What position (of course don't name the company) and what makes you hate it about from the people side? To a certain degree I thought that graduate schemes were suppose to fast track you so no training etc sounds weird

    Are you sure there is 100% no scope for change because I'm sure you know just how hard it is to get a job right now....
    All I can say is that it isn't a scheme, it's a proper grad job. I'm finding it hard to get my head around some of the technical skills required for the job because it hasn't been explained in a way I'm comfortable with. I'm struggling with somewhat "basic" concepts and all my manager seems to do is take the same approach each time, and then spew out some behavioural competencies.

    The job role itself requires someone who's very numerate, proactive and sociable. I'm someone who's quite detail oriented and prefers to get things right and then move on to another task, rather than be forced to do a new task in a small time constraint and be expected to do it correctly.

    Grads have found it to be a similar experience. They were offered little support and are basically thrown into the work. I've been thrown into the deep end - while I might be alright if I actually enjoyed the work, I don't. I feel like I'm only here because it's a roundabout way of becoming what I actually want to do, but the team is unsupportive and the culture is very much, "I went through hell, you can too."

    HR told me that it takes a good 4-6 months to get settled into a new position, but dear lord, it feels like I'm trying to fit a round peg into a square hole.

    I was good at my degree because I was passionate about it. I enjoyed what I was doing, and worked hard as a result because I had a curiosity to understand things. Here, I'm no longer curious because it's just time constraints, deadlines and learning quickly as opposed to learning at your own pace. My pace just isn't quick enough, and I'm actually afraid that it'll be the same whereever I go.

    There must be plenty of graduates who have taken up jobs and quit very early on, surely? Perhaps not in a recession, but surely the experience and the fact that I battled through for a few months is a positive spin on things? I've noticed that the world, and even TSR, tends to jump to the extreme negative conclusion. I imagine a recruiter looking at my CV and thinking, "didn't stick at it? Bin his CV", whereas someone with a more balanced view of the world would probably think, "oh, he has a lot of the skills we're looking for, let's invite him for an interview."

    I agree that there's no sense in simply leaving. I would need to really work at it before I realise that the job just isn't for me, so I'll really mull this over before I make any rash decisions.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I left a top grad scheme after a week with nothing lined up because I knew it wasn't for me. Now that may sound crazy to some people and it probably was, but it was absolutely the right decision for me. I moved half way across the country for this job, before I arrived I was supposed to receive a job description, I never had one because my manager was on long term sick. So when I got there the job was totally different to what I expected. I spent a few days shadowing various people and I just knew that a job where I was basically stuck at a desk all day on a computer was going to make me unhappy. I also realised that I wasn't really "cut throat" enough for the job, I didn't feel comfortable with the way the people I was shadowing were treating other members of staff and how patients were just viewed in terms of money. The grad scheme was two years long and the thought of doing this for the next two years filled me with dread.

    So after a week I told my manager that I'm incredibly sorry, but I've realised that I'm not the right person for the job and that I'd be wasting their time by sticking it out only to quit further down the line. I moved back home and started job hunting and got a few interviews, then the place where I did my placement year found out I was job hunting and phoned me up to offer me a job. I've been there since October now and I'm much much happier. I haven't included the grad scheme on my CV and luckily there was only a gap of a few months between me graduating and starting my current job, so it doesn't cause any problems.

    I don't know your personal situation in regards to being able to financially cope without working for a few months, or whether you have a lot of work experience prior to this. If this is your only real work experience then I would strongly recommend sticking it out for a bit longer and looking for other jobs, you can explain on your application that you are leaving because of a lack of training opportunities. One of my friends did that 4 months into a new job and she still got interviews. If you have a lot of work experience prior to this job and it's making you that unhappy then it wouldn't be the worse thing in the world for you to quit, go home and look for another job. I did that and things worked out for me, it's not worth making your self that unhappy over a job.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)

    Grads have found it to be a similar experience. They were offered little support and are basically thrown into the work. I've been thrown into the deep end - while I might be alright if I actually enjoyed the work, I don't. I feel like I'm only here because it's a roundabout way of becoming what I actually want to do, but the team is unsupportive and the culture is very much, "I went through hell, you can too."
    Reminds - what I'm thinking about my current job at the moment. I also work for two months at this place, since 1 February. But in my way it's a bit different. I'm a kind of "microboss" . I command people (about a dozen) who should obey me... But they don't... I go up-stairs each Tuesday and get critics for their non-activity from the main boss. He doesn't offer me any kind of pressure instruments and I have no opportunity to force others to obey the orders. The staff I head - always happens to work part-time in several other places too, that's why they don't have enough time to provide different activities and so on. People who work over here part time (and have another main job) do much more than the staff does. Everything what the staff don't do - falls on me... The staff members have time to earn additional money, during a week, and I don't.

    Besides I already do some work for the Legal department and for HR... although officially I have another functions.

    We need to provide extra large amount of work in nearby future. And what do I hear from one of the persons: "I'm too old to type all the documents, I need someone to be my secretary" . And looks on me... !!!!!

    As soon as I get my documents from the Ministry, I'll get based on them military ticket. After that I probably will join police. Cause if to compare their salary with mine... the police gets more than twice more... I won't be boss already, but have to be duty only for myself.

    By the way.
    English is not my native and I may commit grammar mistakes. Conditions of my current work don't allow me to improve it. Besides at TSR I'm a complete stranger - I live all my life in another country and work there.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    I found a job in London after about six months of pining for being back with my friends and in the London environment. Now I'm back, and working my first ever full time job, I have experienced what people would call culture shock. Having to do exactly the same thing every day, on very cold days, drains the mind a little bit. People do it for fifty odd years so it's not a cause of complaint as such rather than something that just needs getting used to. Whenever I'm stressed at work I just look at my autumn self and how I wished then for what I've got now. The way I talk about work at the moment would lead some to believe that I hate my job. Far from it. I'd be absolutely devastated if the carpet were pulled from under my feet.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by laura130490)
    I don't know your personal situation in regards to being able to financially cope without working for a few months, or whether you have a lot of work experience prior to this. If this is your only real work experience then I would strongly recommend sticking it out for a bit longer and looking for other jobs, you can explain on your application that you are leaving because of a lack of training opportunities. One of my friends did that 4 months into a new job and she still got interviews. If you have a lot of work experience prior to this job and it's making you that unhappy then it wouldn't be the worse thing in the world for you to quit, go home and look for another job. I did that and things worked out for me, it's not worth making your self that unhappy over a job.
    I was rather happy that you were telling me exactly what I wanted to hear, up until the point where you said the above. While I would consider this an option, I really don't understand what I'm doing. It's all just hazy and it doesn't quite sit right in my head. It almost feels like a splinter, constantly irritating me at every moment.

    I'm not really sure why I can't think like my coworkers, but my brain just doesn't work that way. I can't help but wonder exactly how long I'm going to last in this job and whether I'm really cut out for it. People have told me it takes up to a whole year to really get to grips with the work, but dear god it really does feel like an enormous struggle, especially when you have coworkers laughing at you and behavioural competencies thrown your way, with looks of disappointment and countless snide remarks. It's disappointing and thoroughly demoralising.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    1) All I can say is that it isn't a scheme, it's a proper grad job. I'm finding it hard to get my head around some of the technical skills required for the job because it hasn't been explained in a way I'm comfortable with. I'm struggling with somewhat "basic" concepts and all my manager seems to do is take the same approach each time, and then spew out some behavioural competencies.

    The job role itself requires someone who's very numerate, proactive and sociable. I'm someone who's quite detail oriented and prefers to get things right and then move on to another task, rather than be forced to do a new task in a small time constraint and be expected to do it correctly.

    Grads have found it to be a similar experience. They were offered little support and are basically thrown into the work. I've been thrown into the deep end - while I might be alright if I actually enjoyed the work, I don't. I feel like I'm only here because it's a roundabout way of becoming what I actually want to do, but the team is unsupportive and the culture is very much, "I went through hell, you can too."

    HR told me that it takes a good 4-6 months to get settled into a new position, but dear lord, it feels like I'm trying to fit a round peg into a square hole.

    I was good at my degree because I was passionate about it. I enjoyed what I was doing, and worked hard as a result because I had a curiosity to understand things. Here, I'm no longer curious because it's just time constraints, deadlines and learning quickly as opposed to learning at your own pace. My pace just isn't quick enough, and I'm actually afraid that it'll be the same whereever I go.

    There must be plenty of graduates who have taken up jobs and quit very early on, surely? Perhaps not in a recession, but surely the experience and the fact that I battled through for a few months is a positive spin on things? I've noticed that the world, and even TSR, tends to jump to the extreme negative conclusion. 2) I imagine a recruiter looking at my CV and thinking, "didn't stick at it? Bin his CV", whereas someone with a more balanced view of the world would probably think, "oh, he has a lot of the skills we're looking for, let's invite him for an interview."

    I agree that there's no sense in simply leaving. I would need to really work at it before I realise that the job just isn't for me, so I'll really mull this over before I make any rash decisions.
    While I still maintain that you ultimately are the only one who really knows your situation, a lot of the above does give the impression that you've possibly come out of the reasonably laid back academic system and are struggling to adjust to a professional workload. It's a different world once you graduate, but ultimately the laid back uni experience couldn't last forever, you've got to earn your money! Think about it carefully.

    As for the two bold bits in particular;

    1) Graduate schemes are 'proper jobs'. A graduate scheme is just a name given to imply the job is part of a structured training programme designed to progress the graduate joiner within the company. If you join a large company within a graduate position then you are almost certainly joining a graduate scheme. It is a full time permanent job. Did the company you joined take on several graduates at the same time, and do they offer a set programme of training opportunities every few months etc? If so, you probably are on a graduate scheme.

    2) To be blunt, in the real world recruiters get far more CVs then they could possibly hope to interview. They have to majorly narrow the process between application and interview, so unfortunately realistically a big question mark on your CV can absolutely be enough to get your application binned. Harsh, but true I'm afraid.
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    Many people will already know I'm not happy with my job. People treat me like a mute idiot, there is no support, training or any form of buddy system. I am incredibly unhappy and I'm sure the job isn't for me.

    I am left in a terrible situation. I want to go, come home and job hunt, but i have no time to do so. I'm depressed all the time and the 12 hour day is unbearable, door to door.

    It can't just be me feeling like this! I feel utterly alone and defeated at work and genuinely afraid of asking about trivial questions. If i leave, how likely will it affect future employment?

    I've been there for over two months and i dislike both the work and the environment. What can i do? Sticking it out doesn't feel like an option anymore.
    What field are you in if you do not mind me asking.

    If you are soooo unhappy there then maybe leaving will be the option but I was so unhappy with my previous job and wanted to leave but my family members especially mum kept on saying I should manage and keep applying to other jobs.

    I managed to stick it out and ended up working there for 10 months. If you can manage to get 6 months experience before leaving.

    Where I am now is much better and it is not a graduate scheme but the pay is good and I am working alongside people with over 5 years financial experience and I graduated July 2011.

    Graduate scheme is not for everyone and there aren't enough for everyone. Speak to your manager or someone before you give in your notice.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    especially when you have coworkers laughing at you and behavioural competencies thrown your way, with looks of disappointment and countless snide remarks. It's disappointing and thoroughly demoralising.
    I was going to say it sounds like the culture shock of leaving the warm, cosy bubble of academia and entering the world of work, but your co-workers sound like dicks and the company you're at doesn't sound too good either.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    All I can say is that it isn't a scheme, it's a proper grad job. I'm finding it hard to get my head around some of the technical skills required for the job because it hasn't been explained in a way I'm comfortable with. I'm struggling with somewhat "basic" concepts and all my manager seems to do is take the same approach each time, and then spew out some behavioural competencies.

    The job role itself requires someone who's very numerate, proactive and sociable. I'm someone who's quite detail oriented and prefers to get things right and then move on to another task, rather than be forced to do a new task in a small time constraint and be expected to do it correctly.

    While the place you're working at doesn't sound great, it does sound like you've been a bit naive to what working life would be like. Did you have any particular expectations before you started looking for jobs? You should have prepared yourself to be flexible and adaptable, that's part of being a suitable candidate for a grad scheme which is more intensive because they do fast-track you. You also don't sound mentally tough enough if you want to quit after a couple of months just because the situation makes you feel uncomfortable because that's really all it is. I wouldn't really call adjusting to the job 'battling through', this is standard for most people and in some way your colleagues are right; they could do it and you should be able to as well.

    Yes it may be difficult, yes you may not be used to it and you have to find different methods of working but it's no reason to quit. If you want a half decent job then that's what you'll have to do no matter where you work, especially if you ever envisage getting to the top.

    Suck it up OP
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    If the behaviour of your coworkers is so bad that is making you want to quit, you need to write down everything that has been said and done and take it to HR. If this is genuine bullying or harassment then they will take this seriously. And when you're not making this list and discussing it with HR, you should be applying for jobs. Another thing to add - are the snide comments directed at your competence (something out of your control) or your attitude (something you can control)? It's very possible you have a graduate attitude.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by M1011)
    While I still maintain that you ultimately are the only one who really knows your situation, a lot of the above does give the impression that you've possibly come out of the reasonably laid back academic system and are struggling to adjust to a professional workload. It's a different world once you graduate, but ultimately the laid back uni experience couldn't last forever, you've got to earn your money! Think about it carefully.

    As for the two bold bits in particular;

    1) Graduate schemes are 'proper jobs'. A graduate scheme is just a name given to imply the job is part of a structured training programme designed to progress the graduate joiner within the company. If you join a large company within a graduate position then you are almost certainly joining a graduate scheme. It is a full time permanent job. Did the company you joined take on several graduates at the same time, and do they offer a set programme of training opportunities every few months etc? If so, you probably are on a graduate scheme.

    2) To be blunt, in the real world recruiters get far more CVs then they could possibly hope to interview. They have to majorly narrow the process between application and interview, so unfortunately realistically a big question mark on your CV can absolutely be enough to get your application binned. Harsh, but true I'm afraid.
    Perhaps I simply got the wrong job. If I'm honest, I look thoroughly demoralised and depressed nowadays and I'm surprised that such a large organisation really doesn't care much. I've been employed in a job role that requires quite a bit of experience to accomplish and there is no formal training. All I've had is a single induction day, and the rest is about learning on the job, which I've since realised I'm just not suited to, because I've got no passion or understanding of what I'm doing.

    This really damaging and toxic combination has forced me to try and expand out, try talking to people in different departments etc, but nobody seems to really know or understand my job role, because nobody else is doing it.

    From other (grad and non-grad) jobs, I have the impression that:
    • If you want to understand something, you are helped
    • If you don't understand it the first time, you are not mocked or talked about behind your back
    • There are other grads coming in with 0 experience and understand what it's like, and are supportive and continue to help with any problems in understanding
    • You aren't expected to do the job straight away at a perfect standard
    • You're given supplementary information for your job role (textbooks, qualifications, that apply directly to your role in the company)

    All this isn't exaggerated because I'm not the type of person to do so. Before I landed this job I really thought companies were perhaps a little more forgiving, since they know exactly who they hired, and they know they need to give someone the time to learn something new.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
    Useful resources

    Articles and guides:

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A-Z of careers Advice on choosing a careerCV writing helpCovering letter helpInterview tips

    Featured recruiter profiles:

    CGI logo

    CGI is open for applications

    "Offering a range of apprentice and sponsored degree positions."

    Deutsche Bank logo

    Deutsche Bank is recruiting

    "Thrive in an international banking environment"

    ICAEW logo

    Merck

    "Merck is a global leader in specialized pharma & chemicals – join us!"

    Army logo

    The Army is recruiting now

    "With hundreds of roles available, there’s more than one way to be the best."

    Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

    Handle your digital footprint

    What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

    Quick links:

    Unanswered career sector and employment threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.