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When moving off, which pedal do you hit first? Watch

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    In my lessons, I tap the clutch first and bring it up slightly before gently adding gas, but I often stall.

    I've been reading stuff though which says you should apply gas slightly first, clutch second, is that right?
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    It depends if you're driving a petrol or diesel car.
    I'm learning in a diesel and first I put down the clutch and then I apply a bit of gas. It's all about how quickly you bring up the clutch - too fast and you WILL stall!!
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    (Original post by hannahlucy94)
    It depends if you're driving a petrol or diesel car.
    I'm learning in a diesel and first I put down the clutch and then I apply a bit of gas. It's all about how quickly you bring up the clutch - too fast and you WILL stall!!
    So do you hold the clutch at about half way, and then apply more gas before slowly releasing the clutch completely?
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    Start by applying the gas first, till about 1000 revs. Try practicing on a slight incline.
    If you're in a newer petrol car, you can get away with using "clutch control" and not touching the gas at very low speeds eg when reversing out of a parking space. But you can only do this on a flat plane, so it's best to keep using gas before clutch until you are confident you won't stall.


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    (Original post by snapper1)
    In my lessons, I tap the clutch first and bring it up slightly before gently adding gas, but I often stall.

    I've been reading stuff though which says you should apply gas slightly first, clutch second, is that right?
    You stall either because you don't have enough gas (make sure the dial is at around 1.5) Or you're stalling because you lifted the clutch too quickly. Make sure you have enough gas, bring the clutch up half way till the car starts to move and keep your feet still, whilst applying gas, and once you're moving you can lift the clutch fully up.
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    Make sure the handbrake is off! lol.

    Practice at first on the straight and level.

    At first depress the accelerator to bring the engine revs up slightly. You will hear the change in pitch.

    Now very slowly release the clutch. When the clutch begins to bite, you will both hear the change in engine pitch (which starts to slow again) and also through touch with the gear stick which may move slightly.

    As this happens apply more gas and then release the clutch ever so slowly while trying to keep the engine from slowing down by applying more gas.

    It's a kind-of dual movement, slowly releasing the clutch while the gas gets more pressure.

    If the engine stalls, you have either not applied enough gas or brought the clutch up too quickly or probably a combination of both.

    If you are doing hill starts, you have to combine/co-ordinate the above with the use of the handbrake and also you will need a lot more gas depending on the steepness of the hill.

    Starting with the car pointing downhill requires the use of the footbrake with the clutch fully depressed until the car is moving.
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    (Original post by L1000)
    You stall either because you don't have enough gas (make sure the dial is at around 1.5) Or you're stalling because you lifted the clutch too quickly. Make sure you have enough gas, bring the clutch up half way till the car starts to move and keep your feet still, whilst applying gas, and once you're moving you can lift the clutch fully up.
    Thanks also, when you're stuck in traffic, do you put the handbrake up then put the car in neutral? Or leave it in first?
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    Revs up
    Release clutch until revs start to decrease
    Release handbrake
    Continue to build revs and release clutch

    (Original post by snapper1)
    Thanks also, when you're stuck in traffic, do you put the handbrake up then put the car in neutral? Or leave it in first?
    Depends how long I'm going to be there.
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    (Original post by snapper1)
    Thanks also, when you're stuck in traffic, do you put the handbrake up then put the car in neutral? Or leave it in first?
    Just leave it in first really, unless you're on a hill at the risk of rolling backwards or when you think that you will be in traffic for a long time.
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    I've driven a diesel and a petrol, and (as far as I can remember) I used a slightly different technique for each one. I tend not to think about it that much, but I guess it would be:

    Diesel: Lift the clutch up a little first, add some accelerator, slowly up with the remainder of the clutch, then add more accelerator.

    Petrol: A bit of accelerator first, find the biting point on the clutch, continue to lift the clutch whilst adding more accelerator.

    Like I said, this is what I imagine I do; I don't really think about it any more. When you're learning, the key to setting off is just to do everything without rushing. As they say: "More haste, less speed"! Or something like that...
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    (Original post by snapper1)
    In my lessons, I tap the clutch first and bring it up slightly before gently adding gas, but I often stall.

    I've been reading stuff though which says you should apply gas slightly first, clutch second, is that right?
    me personally, i find the "sweet spot" where i apply the gas (slowly) and slowly release the clutch at the same time. It's just one of those things that you need to try a few different things and different timings and you'll soon figure out what needs to be done. Don't worry about the stalling. Just go to a quiet road somewhere and practice moving from a stationary position.

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    my sister crashed her company car her 1st week into a new job - tomtom took her into an alley and she crashed into a fence when trying to reverse out, lol
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    (Original post by FrogInABog)
    I've driven a diesel and a petrol, and (as far as I can remember) I used a slightly different technique for each one. I tend not to think about it that much, but I guess it would be:

    Diesel: Lift the clutch up a little first, add some accelerator, slowly up with the remainder of the clutch, then add more accelerator.

    Petrol: A bit of accelerator first, find the biting point on the clutch, continue to lift the clutch whilst adding more accelerator.

    Like I said, this is what I imagine I do; I don't really think about it any more. When you're learning, the key to setting off is just to do everything without rushing. As they say: "More haste, less speed"! Or something like that...
    I think I'll carry on lifting the clutch slowly first, although I have no idea what fuel type the car is ha , but thanks!
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    The clutch and gas is like a seesaw, initially, the clutch is fully down whilst the gas is fully up (not being used). However, you have to put some gas in, to around 1000rpm, then slowly release the clutch until you see the bonnet of the car lift up, the car will make a croaking noise and then release the handbrake.

    IT will take some time getting used to, but now I know exactly where the bite is on my instructors car, so I can get my car moving quickly.
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    (Original post by FrogInABog)
    I've driven a diesel and a petrol, and (as far as I can remember) I used a slightly different technique for each one. I tend not to think about it that much, but I guess it would be:

    Diesel: Lift the clutch up a little first, add some accelerator, slowly up with the remainder of the clutch, then add more accelerator.

    Petrol: A bit of accelerator first, find the biting point on the clutch, continue to lift the clutch whilst adding more accelerator.

    Like I said, this is what I imagine I do; I don't really think about it any more. When you're learning, the key to setting off is just to do everything without rushing. As they say: "More haste, less speed"! Or something like that...
    With the diesel, you can still gas it first, then start to release the clutch. I do it all the time in my instructors car.
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    (Original post by rock_climber86)
    me personally, i find the "sweet spot" where i apply the gas (slowly) and slowly release the clutch at the same time. It's just one of those things that you need to try a few different things and different timings and you'll soon figure out what needs to be done. Don't worry about the stalling. Just go to a quiet road somewhere and practice moving from a stationary position.

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    my sister crashed her company car her 1st week into a new job - tomtom took her into an alley and she crashed into a fence when trying to reverse out, lol
    Oh no! I haven't got onto reversing yet unsurprisingly but I'm sure lots of fences will be in danger when I do I always panic when I stall and just try press everything without thinking, then stall again! I'm so rubbish at this driving business lol.
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    (Original post by James A)
    The clutch and gas is like a seesaw, initially, the clutch is fully down whilst the gas is fully up (not being used). However, you have to put some gas in, to around 1000rpm, then slowly release the clutch until you see the bonnet of the car lift up, the car will make a croaking noise and then release the handbrake.

    IT will take some time getting used to, but now I know exactly where the bite is on my instructors car, so I can get my car moving quickly.
    I was told by my instructor to only use the handbrake when starting off on hills, normally I take it off after I've put it in gear, then begin work on the pedals :confused:
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    (Original post by snapper1)
    I think I'll carry on lifting the clutch slowly first, although I have no idea what fuel type the car is ha , but thanks!

    (Original post by James A)
    With the diesel, you can still gas it first, then start to release the clutch. I do it all the time in my instructors car.
    It really depends from car to car. Some cars will set off really easily on the clutch alone, some need a bit of accelerator to get it moving. The car I learnt in was an example of the former: add much gas before the clutch was up, and it would over-rev horribly. The car I drive at the moment, on the other hand, is very much the latter: it's virtually impossible to set off without a fair it of accelerator.

    I guess it's just best to judge what feels right in the car you're driving at the time.
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    (Original post by snapper1)
    I was told by my instructor to only use the handbrake when starting off on hills, normally I take it off after I've put it in gear, then begin work on the pedals :confused:
    No, I always keep the handbrake when keeping the car is parked. It's always good practice to do so, it gives you that peace of mind incase the car does roll back slightly.

    No, no, no, always find your biting point with the handbrake on, then release the handbrake. This is really important if you are on the hill, otherwise your car will roll back whilst you're busy trying to find the biting point.
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    (Original post by snapper1)
    Oh no! I haven't got onto reversing yet unsurprisingly but I'm sure lots of fences will be in danger when I do I always panic when I stall and just try press everything without thinking, then stall again! I'm so rubbish at this driving business lol.
    oh no! You mustn't panic. Let others around you get into road rage mode - that's their problem. You just have to chill out and concentrate on what you're doing. When I stall or do something like that I just think about SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY first. Rushing and pressing everything is the least safe thing to do in my opinion. I find if i'm in a pressured situation with people horning, I just go back to basics. I turn car engine off, put handbrake on, put car into neutral, and start from scratch by turning engine on, going into gear one, getting to biting point, looking around, releasing handbrake and fully releasing the clutch and gradually pressing on the gas. Better be safe than hasty and dangerous right?

    I'm sure the fences will be fine if you chill out and don't panic
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    (Original post by FrogInABog)
    It really depends from car to car. Some cars will set off really easily on the clutch alone, some need a bit of accelerator to get it moving. The car I learnt in was an example of the former: add much gas before the clutch was up, and it would over-rev horribly. The car I drive at the moment, on the other hand, is very much the latter: it's virtually impossible to set off without a fair it of accelerator.

    I guess it's just best to judge what feels right in the car you're driving at the time.
    Well what car do you learn in?

    I learn in a Citroen DS3, I see your point though, however my car needs a little gas to get moving. IT will defo move with the clutch, but because I always keep my handbrake on whilst stationery for long periods, I need a little gas to be convinced it's biting. :lol:
 
 
 
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