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Is getting a degree the best way towards getting a good career? Need some advice! Watch

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    I am 24 years old and I have no idea what to do with my future. I have been unsure since I left college after studying for a useless BTEC in Sport studies. I have been in and out of different jobs, but nothing really grabs my attention and makes me think "That's what I want to do".

    I keep hearing that University is the way forward, that getting a degree is the best way to earn a good living, but is it?
    Even so, I still don't know what i would like to study. I was thinking of an English degree, but I'm 24 now, so time I go back to education, I will be (after finishing an access course) 26 years old.

    I know it's not old, but still, by the time I finish a degree I will be 28 (almost 29) and it's just late in life to start following a career path. Most people get an education early, go to Uni, come out and start working towards their career.

    Every job that doesn't require a degree doesn't lead to much. You either work your way up and become a manager (which doesn't really appeal to me) or you work in a dead end job for the rest of your life.

    Sorry, I haven't provided much info. I don't really know what else to say to be honest. I would have gone to University at a younger age, but I just didn't feel it was the right move for me.

    What are your thoughts on this?
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    It really depends on your field. Get a degree is very important for some professions whilst others require good work experience e.g music and film industry. Internships are becoming popular as well as more companies are open to training staff and this could lead to permanent positions. I just started my Accounting degree and will be 24 by the time I finish. I still have a further three years after that so Ill be 27 by the time I finish education and actually start working. It's not late, it's a good age to start your career.
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    (Original post by drummer)
    It really depends on your field. Get a degree is very important for some professions whilst others require good work experience e.g music and film industry. Internships are becoming popular as well as more companies are open to training staff and this could lead to permanent positions. I just started my Accounting degree and will be 24 by the time I finish. I still have a further three years after that so Ill be 27 by the time I finish education and actually start working. It's not late, it's a good age to start your career.
    I understand what you're saying. There are many people (including friends of mine and people I know) who aren't in jobs, don't have a degree, have a dead end job at my age and older. I guess it isn't that bad, but it's just going back to education at my age that is the issue.
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    I have just decided to do a degree myself at 31.

    Like yourself I have a background in Fitness training; even in the leisure industry I have come across a kibnd of ceiling - The more senior management roles or even potential roles require degree level education.

    Currently I work as a Personal trainer in a (big) corporate facility; A few people have told me that they have risen as high in the ranks as they are able to, without a university education.

    If I were you I would do it - if nothing else it will give you 3 years to reflect on what you want to do. It certainly won't work against you.

    Furthermore; I believe there is still a remaining class element in this country. A degree isn't entirely about education
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    (Original post by Jd1982)
    I have just decided to do a degree myself at 31.

    Like yourself I have a background in Fitness training; even in the leisure industry I have come across a kibnd of ceiling - The more senior management roles or even potential roles require degree level education.

    Currently I work as a Personal trainer in a (big) corporate facility; A few people have told me that they have risen as high in the ranks as they are able to, without a university education.

    If I were you I would do it - if nothing else it will give you 3 years to reflect on what you want to do. It certainly won't work against you.

    Furthermore; I believe there is still a remaining class element in this country. A degree isn't entirely about education
    Yeah, I just want to do something that will lead to a good career. But, I don't want to go to University for the sake of going. I am trying to decide what will be a good option for me. At the end of the day, I want to leave University and have a degree which will help me find work.

    What will you be studying?

    I actually wanted to get into Personal training, but some people say there isn't enough work around due to recession etc.

    Have you found work hard as a PT?
    Have you tried freelance personal training?
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    Finding work as a PT is relatively easy, as big health chains don't care if they have 1 trainer doing 100 sessions a week or 100 trainers doing 1 - it's all income.

    To be honest I'd advise against it, based on what you've said. It's a great job, social with 0 stress; but there isn't much progression. You either set up as a full time PT and get a business going, or you move into leisure management. The management side of the industry is generally full of low calibre people - plus you move away from the fitness side of things.

    Much like yourself, I couldn't decide what I wanted to do so I trained as a PT. it's a great way to tread water, as it were, but not a career. Everyone is a PT now and the variation in knowledge and quality is massive - REPS only has 4 levels - 1 being trainee and 4 being specialist. So a PT could be an ex pro athlete, have a Sports degree and have 10 years experience and still be the same level as someone who hasnt set fut in a gym other than doing a 6 week training course.

    I have been a PT on and off since 2008. I've worked in health clubs, leisure centres and freelanced. I've also been a gym manager. With this experience, several training courses, 2 NVQ level 3's and over 10 years experience working out myself, I can expect to earn little over minimum wage.

    To be fair, I didn't notice any impact from the recession.

    If I was sensible I would have studied physiotherapy, as there's reasonable prospects in that. But I'm really done with the fitness thing. I've chosen to do French and Journalism at a poor Uni - so my prospects won't be great. Having said that, they rebuilt a centre I worked at, all staff were invited to apply for more senior positions - all of which required a degree, any degree.

    My advice? If you can afford to do a PT course them do, it'd be a good way to pick up extra cash/work whilst studying. If you go into it proper, don't look at doing so for more than 2 years.

    Im sure plenty of hopefuls will pipe up saying how great it is, I would have a few years ago. But long term it's a no go
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    No, a degree is not the only way forward. There are apprenticeships too. If you can get on an Accounting scheme you can be a chartered accountant in 5 years. If you can get on an Engineering apprenticeship you could become a qualified engineer quickly too.
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    (Original post by Jd1982)
    Finding work as a PT is relatively easy, as big health chains don't care if they have 1 trainer doing 100 sessions a week or 100 trainers doing 1 - it's all income.

    To be honest I'd advise against it, based on what you've said. It's a great job, social with 0 stress; but there isn't much progression. You either set up as a full time PT and get a business going, or you move into leisure management. The management side of the industry is generally full of low calibre people - plus you move away from the fitness side of things.

    Much like yourself, I couldn't decide what I wanted to do so I trained as a PT. it's a great way to tread water, as it were, but not a career. Everyone is a PT now and the variation in knowledge and quality is massive - REPS only has 4 levels - 1 being trainee and 4 being specialist. So a PT could be an ex pro athlete, have a Sports degree and have 10 years experience and still be the same level as someone who hasnt set fut in a gym other than doing a 6 week training course.

    I have been a PT on and off since 2008. I've worked in health clubs, leisure centres and freelanced. I've also been a gym manager. With this experience, several training courses, 2 NVQ level 3's and over 10 years experience working out myself, I can expect to earn little over minimum wage.

    To be fair, I didn't notice any impact from the recession.

    If I was sensible I would have studied physiotherapy, as there's reasonable prospects in that. But I'm really done with the fitness thing. I've chosen to do French and Journalism at a poor Uni - so my prospects won't be great. Having said that, they rebuilt a centre I worked at, all staff were invited to apply for more senior positions - all of which required a degree, any degree.

    My advice? If you can afford to do a PT course them do, it'd be a good way to pick up extra cash/work whilst studying. If you go into it proper, don't look at doing so for more than 2 years.

    Im sure plenty of hopefuls will pipe up saying how great it is, I would have a few years ago. But long term it's a no go
    Hi, mate hope it's cool. I sent you a PM instead of messaging here.
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    Life is all about learning. Be it in a job or in an educational institution. You'll be 30ish when you come out, but you know what, you'll still be working for another 40 after that! So if you believe a degree will help you, go and get one. I wouldn't waste my time if it isn't at a top 30 university as it probably wouldn't help you too much. However, if it's from a respectable institution and age is your only worry, I say go for it!
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    Depends what you want to do really. A degree can be either a great launch pad for your career or a pretty piece of paper for your wall, just depends what degree you get and how you use it really.
 
 
 
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