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Arty's new PC - an educational project. watch

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    Let's get down to business. I'm sick of buying laptops, running them into the ground, then having to buy a new laptop. This is why I'm going to build my own

    The only problem is, I have no idea how. Like genuinely no idea. I know little about the workings of computers and have no history in computing :erm:

    BUT! I am willing to learn. Within a month I'm aiming to learn how to build a PC, what all the components do and what components are necessary/good value. All advice is welcome and encouraged, from educational posts on the ins and outs of building, to component comparisons, peripheral reviews - you name it :cute:

    For those willing to help me find parts: here's some background. I'll need a PC capable of video editing, gaming, potentially streaming too. Budget for the tower is probably around £1000 - I can go higher if you can convince me a component is worth it :sly:

    For those willing to educate me: I have no idea what I'm doing. I need a run down of all the vital components, what they do and why they're vital. I need to know how to hook up double monitors. I don't mind if you link me to guides, FAQs, other reputable computing sites or just type me horror stories about not getting wires caught in cooling fans. I also need to know about cooling fans vs water cooling. SSD? yay or nay? Overclocking - free performance or am I just wrecking my parts? .....etc.

    In conclusion...

    +rep for helpful posts, free hugs for those who go above and beyond and expect the OP to be regularly updated with new questions on all things practical and component related :yep:
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    Newegg's How To Build A Computer series seems to be a popular starting point for a lot of people :yep:

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    (Original post by Artymess)
    Let's get down to business. I'm sick of buying laptops, running them into the ground, then having to buy a new laptop. This is why I'm going to build my own

    The only problem is, I have no idea how. Like genuinely no idea. I know little about the workings of computers and have no history in computing :erm:

    BUT! I am willing to learn. Within a month I'm aiming to learn how to build a PC, what all the components do and what components are necessary/good value. All advice is welcome and encouraged, from educational posts on the ins and outs of building, to component comparisons, peripheral reviews - you name it :cute:

    For those willing to help me find parts: here's some background. I'll need a PC capable of video editing, gaming, potentially streaming too. Budget for the tower is probably around £1000 - I can go higher if you can convince me a component is worth it :sly:

    For those willing to educate me: I have no idea what I'm doing. I need a run down of all the vital components, what they do and why they're vital. I need to know how to hook up double monitors. I don't mind if you link me to guides, FAQs, other reputable computing sites or just type me horror stories about not getting wires caught in cooling fans. I also need to know about cooling fans vs water cooling. SSD? yay or nay? Overclocking - free performance or am I just wrecking my parts? .....etc.

    In conclusion...

    +rep for helpful posts, free hugs for those who go above and beyond and expect the OP to be regularly updated with new questions on all things practical and component related :yep:
    Link above is about what components and why...

    For building the actual thing, it goes through a lot:


    Then when its up and running and getting software installed:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxaVBsXEiok


    How much video editing are we talking?
    which games are you wanting to play?
    Does this include screen, speaker, keyboard, mice and OS?

    CPU: Stick to Intel.........your reply for the editing question will determine whether you need an i5 or i7
    and which version, depending if your gonna overclock.
    ram: minimum 8gb of ram, 1600mhz+ something low profile in case you put in a aftermarket cooler
    motherboard: depends on your needs
    Graphics card: Depends on your reply for the games, if on a budget AMD is pretty good value, otherwise Nvidia
    HDD: Would say at least 1tb
    SSD: Entirely dependent if speed is very important, but can be costly and small storage, but serious boost in speed, so wise to use to hold the OS, editing software or any games possibly.
    case: Very important, a good case is important to hold everything, but have plenty of airflow...one very good one is the Corsair 300r
    aftermarket cooler: depends on whether overclocking.......water cooling is quite expensive, custom ones are better in my opinion.

    Don't worry about wires, good cases come with wiring support and extra little bits to help tidy the case up
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    (Original post by Iqbal007)
    How much video editing are we talking?
    which games are you wanting to play?
    Does this include screen, speaker, keyboard, mice and OS?

    CPU: Stick to Intel.........your reply for the editing question will determine whether you need an i5 or i7
    and which version, depending if your gonna overclock.
    ram: minimum 8gb of ram, 1600mhz+ something low profile in case you put in a aftermarket cooler
    motherboard: depends on your needs
    Graphics card: Depends on your reply for the games, if on a budget AMD is pretty good value, otherwise Nvidia
    HDD: Would say at least 1tb
    SSD: Entirely dependent if speed is very important, but can be costly and small storage, but serious boost in speed, so wise to use to hold the OS, editing software or any games possibly.
    case: Very important, a good case is important to hold everything, but have plenty of airflow...one very good one is the Corsair 300r
    aftermarket cooler: depends on whether overclocking.......water cooling is quite expensive, custom ones are better in my opinion.

    Don't worry about wires, good cases come with wiring support and extra little bits to help tidy the case up
    Editing: Plenty of editing :yep: On my last laptop I was running Fraps, Sony vegas, Adobe creative suite (illustrator, photoshop, after effects etc) and it just couldn't handle it all :erm:

    These days I play a lot of League of Legends mainly. The system requirements for the game aren't too demanding but I'd like a setup capable of running more taxing games should I decide to pick them up in the future :holmes:

    The budget needs to cover the tower and OS. Mouse, keyboard and other peripherals I'll worry about separately. And just because the budget is £1000 doesn't mean you have to find parts that equal £1000 I'm not spending like £300 on a graphics card if a £200 one is more than suitable, just because there's room in the budget :sly:

    In terms of your run down of the parts - definitely looking at an i5/i7 and an SSD. I need to read more/look at reviews on different types of cooling, different graphics cards and whatnot before I decide on those though :holmes:
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    Gaming - i5, editing and multitasking - i7 although it won't handle games as well as the i5 you should hardly notice a difference. Plus future games will be optimized for an i7.

    Gfx - Nvidia 660 and anything above should be great for a few years, PC gaming means you'll have to upgrade every 2-3 years but its worth it.

    PSU - I'd stick with Corsair or CoolerMaster, the former being my preference.

    RAM - as said above, 1600 + and at least 8gb.

    Mobo - Go with Gigabyte (brand) and a Z77 or higher.

    Hard drive - Depending on how much editing 1tb is good for most things but perhaps push to 2tb if you can afford that and an SSD.
    Maybe a better option is a 1tb HD and a few external HD's to backup important stuff, a lot safer.

    Finally, stick with Windows 7 imo.
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    (Original post by Artymess)
    Editing: Plenty of editing :yep: On my last laptop I was running Fraps, Sony vegas, Adobe creative suite (illustrator, photoshop, after effects etc) and it just couldn't handle it all :erm:

    These days I play a lot of League of Legends mainly. The system requirements for the game aren't too demanding but I'd like a setup capable of running more taxing games should I decide to pick them up in the future :holmes:

    The budget needs to cover the tower and OS. Mouse, keyboard and other peripherals I'll worry about separately. And just because the budget is £1000 doesn't mean you have to find parts that equal £1000 I'm not spending like £300 on a graphics card if a £200 one is more than suitable, just because there's room in the budget :sly:

    In terms of your run down of the parts - definitely looking at an i5/i7 and an SSD. I need to read more/look at reviews on different types of cooling, different graphics cards and whatnot before I decide on those though :holmes:

    If its a lot of video editing........then a i7-3770 is the thing for you, quadcore and 8 threads, its a beast.
    Any overclocking? eg pushing the speed faster then the standard?

    Ok hmmm..........any ideas which games in the future? Lol is easily playable.

    Budget is fine, probably get a good system around £800ish, depending on the graphics, overclocking, etc

    SSD will make things much faster, its about 128gb for £80 from a good vendor......plus you'll need a lot of storage HDD 2tb is £65 or 1tb is around £50.
    Aftermarket coolers depend on whether you want to overclock.
    Graphics card on the games as well
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    (Original post by Iqbal007)
    If its a lot of video editing........then a i7-3770 is the thing for you, quadcore and 8 threads, its a beast.
    Any overclocking? eg pushing the speed faster then the standard?

    Ok hmmm..........any ideas which games in the future? Lol is easily playable.

    Budget is fine, probably get a good system around £800ish, depending on the graphics, overclocking, etc

    SSD will make things much faster, its about 128gb for £80 from a good vendor......plus you'll need a lot of storage HDD 2tb is £65 or 1tb is around £50.
    Aftermarket coolers depend on whether you want to overclock.
    Graphics card on the games as well
    The question is - what is overclocking? See this is an educational thread. I've heard about it in passing, and I've heard a few people refer to it as free performance but I don't know what impact it has on the components, how necessary it is, how easy it is to overclock etc :holmes:

    I don't know what I'll get into in the future...for I cannot see the future :sad: but I don't want to invest in an i5, then find I need an i7 in a year or so because some new game requires it :erm:

    I'll definitely go for an SSD and either 1tb or 2tb HDD (depending on budget)

    So the big question now is for me to understand overclocking and how necessary it is. That'll let us move on to deciding on graphics cards and cooling :yep:
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    (Original post by JB20)
    Gaming - i5, editing and multitasking - i7 although it won't handle games as well as the i5 you should hardly notice a difference. Plus future games will be optimized for an i7.

    Gfx - Nvidia 660 and anything above should be great for a few years, PC gaming means you'll have to upgrade every 2-3 years but its worth it.

    PSU - I'd stick with Corsair or CoolerMaster, the former being my preference.

    RAM - as said above, 1600 + and at least 8gb.

    Mobo - Go with Gigabyte (brand) and a Z77 or higher.

    Hard drive - Depending on how much editing 1tb is good for most things but perhaps push to 2tb if you can afford that and an SSD.
    Maybe a better option is a 1tb HD and a few external HD's to backup important stuff, a lot safer.

    Finally, stick with Windows 7 imo.
    Q) why will the i5 handle current games better than an i7 will?

    Q) why is a corsair PSU your preference?

    Q) Why stick with windows 7? Like I know I'm not getting touchscreens, so the format of windows 8 will be wasted on me a bit, but why is W7 superior? :cute:
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    (Original post by Artymess)
    Q) why will the i5 handle current games better than an i7 will?

    Q) why is a corsair PSU your preference?

    Q) Why stick with windows 7? Like I know I'm not getting touchscreens, so the format of windows 8 will be wasted on me a bit, but why is W7 superior? :cute:
    You should really number your questions

    I'll answer in order:

    A) Games are sometimes negatively effected by hyperthreading (which means, in extremely layman terms, that you have 8 'virtual cores' in a quad core processor) which is present in i7s. It definitely isn't very noticeable - by the sounds of things the i7 is certainly what you should go for.

    A) Corsair is an extremely reliable brand with great warranty. You really want reliability in a PSU, even a PSU that seems to be working can screw up functioning of your PC by say causing Blue Screen of Death crashes.

    A) That is certainly personal preference. Windows 8 will eventually be needed for driver support etc. but at the moment there's not much difference support-wise. However, windows 7 does give the more traditional desktop experience that some people prefer and I believe that is the main reason for JB20's bias. I know some people who were skeptical about Windows 8, but then have been using it due to it coming with a new laptop etc. and have ended up loving it for its superior general speed. I must say it does have a more 'responsive' feel about it than windows 7 (and my windows 7 PC is running on top end hardware so that's not causing slow-down). I'd advise you try out windows 8 and see what you feel like using. You could always buy Windows 8 Pro which gives you the option of installing 7 instead - but I'm unsure of how much that costs.

    I'd definitely suggest an SSD, 256GB preferably. I'd go for the Samsung 840 Pro if you can afford it (currently is about £170-180 and then you can get £20 cashback from Samsung).

    A 2TB 'green' hard drive (this means it runs at 5400 or 5900 RPM rather than 7200+), just because you don't really need a speedy HDD if you have an SSD, and the green hard drives run cooler, quieter and last longer.
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    (Original post by Intriguing Alias)
    I'd definitely suggest an SSD, 256GB preferably. I'd go for the Samsung 840 Pro if you can afford it (currently is about £170-180 and then you can get £20 cashback from Samsung).
    I dunno if you really need the Pro version. The standard version is pretty cheap now (well, in my opinion): http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/sams...shback-1515934

    Whilst that one example is expired, it'll drop to that price again (it was at £115 on Amazon on the 21st March):

    I don't believe the advantages you gain from the Pro version really warrant the 50% price increase, but that's again, my opinion. I'm chuffed with my 256 830 though, and it's a shame they are hard to get hold of.
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    I've built my own computer and tbf, it was a lot easier than I thought, and it took less time as well. You need to use common sense when building it - as a general rule of thumb, if it doesn't fit, don't force it in.

    As people above have said, Corsair is a really good brand and £1000 is enough to make an amazing computer.

    I don't think OS is that important but I prefer Windows 7, personally I'm more familiar with it and some things still have compatibility issues with W8. It's probably cheaper now as well.

    Using a SSD along with a HDD will make your computer really fast.

    Not sure if you need a water cooler (the case I bought had 3 fans built in), I assume you want to stream LoL? I think you need a capture card for that as well, if you want it to stream smoothly (I can watch you play J4 )

    I used this website and the forum to help me build it: http://www.buildyourown.org.uk/

    Another thing - you get what you pay for. I bought a cheap £10 500W power supply unit but it was obviously fake, I bought an Antec one instead which was like £60 IIRC.

    GPU is really important for gaming.

    Sorry for weirdly structured response, but hope this helps
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    (Original post by gumball)
    I dunno if you really need the Pro version. The standard version is pretty cheap now (well, in my opinion): http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/sams...shback-1515934

    Whilst that one example is expired, it'll drop to that price again (it was at £115 on Amazon on the 21st March):

    I don't believe the advantages you gain from the Pro version really warrant the 50% price increase, but that's again, my opinion. I'm chuffed with my 256 830 though, and it's a shame they are hard to get hold of.
    The 840 is a reasonable amount slower than the 830, in fact on many benchmarks it's twice as slow as the 840 Pro - the 840 really is just a budget SSD and doesn't yield great performance at all.
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    (Original post by Intriguing Alias)
    You should really number your questions

    I'll answer in order:

    A) Games are sometimes negatively effected by hyperthreading (which means, in extremely layman terms, that you have 8 'virtual cores' in a quad core processor) which is present in i7s. It definitely isn't very noticeable - by the sounds of things the i7 is certainly what you should go for.

    A) Corsair is an extremely reliable brand with great warranty. You really want reliability in a PSU, even a PSU that seems to be working can screw up functioning of your PC by say causing Blue Screen of Death crashes.

    A) That is certainly personal preference. Windows 8 will eventually be needed for driver support etc. but at the moment there's not much difference support-wise. However, windows 7 does give the more traditional desktop experience that some people prefer and I believe that is the main reason for JB20's bias. I know some people who were skeptical about Windows 8, but then have been using it due to it coming with a new laptop etc. and have ended up loving it for its superior general speed. I must say it does have a more 'responsive' feel about it than windows 7 (and my windows 7 PC is running on top end hardware so that's not causing slow-down). I'd advise you try out windows 8 and see what you feel like using. You could always buy Windows 8 Pro which gives you the option of installing 7 instead - but I'm unsure of how much that costs.

    I'd definitely suggest an SSD, 256GB preferably. I'd go for the Samsung 840 Pro if you can afford it (currently is about £170-180 and then you can get £20 cashback from Samsung).

    A 2TB 'green' hard drive (this means it runs at 5400 or 5900 RPM rather than 7200+), just because you don't really need a speedy HDD if you have an SSD, and the green hard drives run cooler, quieter and last longer.
    Basically what he said. You might want an i7 for editing and making your pc futureproof.

    I'm currently weighing up building my self or getting a company to build for me, if i wasn't so lazy I'd be building but I honestly can't be bothered!

    Good luck, this threads got some great advice.
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    (Original post by Artymess)
    The question is - what is overclocking? See this is an educational thread. I've heard about it in passing, and I've heard a few people refer to it as free performance but I don't know what impact it has on the components, how necessary it is, how easy it is to overclock etc :holmes:

    I don't know what I'll get into in the future...for I cannot see the future :sad: but I don't want to invest in an i5, then find I need an i7 in a year or so because some new game requires it :erm:

    I'll definitely go for an SSD and either 1tb or 2tb HDD (depending on budget)

    So the big question now is for me to understand overclocking and how necessary it is. That'll let us move on to deciding on graphics cards and cooling :yep:
    Its where you modify the software which runs the processor to go faster then it does already.......... for example most people who an i5-3570k overclock to run at 4.5GHZ ish instead of the standard 3.6Ghz.
    So a significant increase in performance............however it comes with issues, a large increase in temperature which can degrade the components life, hence why people buy aftermarket coolers which are superior the standard one which give better cooling and hence lower temperature.

    Ease of doing overclocking varies on the motherboard, some come with software which makes it very easy to do so, it isn't necessary, but if you want to there will be plenty of guides online.

    Well an i7 is ideal for video editing.................. currently games are more and more optimising for usage on a quad core system, even console systems are.

    2tb will achievable on your budget as its only £15 more than a 1tb .

    Graphics card entirely depends on the games you wish to play........the best value for money I would say is a 7850 around £130-£140............... best general graphics in terms of performance, worth, cost is the GTX670 but its around £300.
    Cooling, aftermarket cooler which depends on whether overclocking or not. Case wise, a corsair 300r are will do, comes with 2 fans and you can stick an extra 2 x 120mm fans for better airflow.
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    (Original post by Intriguing Alias)
    A) Games are sometimes negatively effected by hyperthreading (which means, in extremely layman terms, that you have 8 'virtual cores' in a quad core processor) which is present in i7s. It definitely isn't very noticeable - by the sounds of things the i7 is certainly what you should go for.
    I took a look at hyperthreading, from what I can see you make 2 virtual cores for every physical processor core? The only drawbacks I could see were from systems/programs not equipped to deal with it. Presumably future ones will be tailored to make use of it so an i7 seems like the thing to go for :yep:

    (Original post by Intriguing Alias)
    A) Corsair is an extremely reliable brand with great warranty. You really want reliability in a PSU, even a PSU that seems to be working can screw up functioning of your PC by say causing Blue Screen of Death crashes.
    A lot of people have been going with Corsair in this thread, but yeh - no point trying to scrimp and save a little bit of money and jeopardising the whole system

    (Original post by Intriguing Alias)
    A) That is certainly personal preference. Windows 8 will eventually be needed for driver support etc. but at the moment there's not much difference support-wise. However, windows 7 does give the more traditional desktop experience that some people prefer and I believe that is the main reason for JB20's bias. I know some people who were skeptical about Windows 8, but then have been using it due to it coming with a new laptop etc. and have ended up loving it for its superior general speed. I must say it does have a more 'responsive' feel about it than windows 7 (and my windows 7 PC is running on top end hardware so that's not causing slow-down). I'd advise you try out windows 8 and see what you feel like using. You could always buy Windows 8 Pro which gives you the option of installing 7 instead - but I'm unsure of how much that costs.

    I'd definitely suggest an SSD, 256GB preferably. I'd go for the Samsung 840 Pro if you can afford it (currently is about £170-180 and then you can get £20 cashback from Samsung).

    A 2TB 'green' hard drive (this means it runs at 5400 or 5900 RPM rather than 7200+), just because you don't really need a speedy HDD if you have an SSD, and the green hard drives run cooler, quieter and last longer.
    I set up my dad's consumer PC with windows 8 and I don't mind it too much - it isn't difficult to get to grips with. I guess over time it'll have more support available than W7 so it's probably the one to go for.

    SSD's definitely decided on :yep: will just need to price up an appropriate one.

    I hadn't heard of 'green' HDDs, I take it the lower RPM is made up for by the speed of the SSD? What are they like in price and reliability compared with a standard HDD?
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    (Original post by gumball)
    Horrifying graphs and details :zomg:
    So what advantages does the Pro version have over the standard one? As I said in the OP, I don't mind spending a bit more on quality components - but it has to be justified :sly:

    Or would you recommend that the standard SSD is suitable and built to last?
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    (Original post by Bude8)
    I've built my own computer and tbf, it was a lot easier than I thought, and it took less time as well. You need to use common sense when building it - as a general rule of thumb, if it doesn't fit, don't force it in.

    As people above have said, Corsair is a really good brand and £1000 is enough to make an amazing computer.

    I don't think OS is that important but I prefer Windows 7, personally I'm more familiar with it and some things still have compatibility issues with W8. It's probably cheaper now as well.

    Using a SSD along with a HDD will make your computer really fast.

    Not sure if you need a water cooler (the case I bought had 3 fans built in), I assume you want to stream LoL? I think you need a capture card for that as well, if you want it to stream smoothly (I can watch you play J4 )

    I used this website and the forum to help me build it: http://www.buildyourown.org.uk/

    Another thing - you get what you pay for. I bought a cheap £10 500W power supply unit but it was obviously fake, I bought an Antec one instead which was like £60 IIRC.

    GPU is really important for gaming.

    Sorry for weirdly structured response, but hope this helps
    Much like my experience with women :sly:

    I think I'll opt for W8 unless I can be convinced otherwise. The idea of this build is to make something futureproof :yep: don't want to be upgrading and replacing a year or so down the line. I will go for an SSD though - no doubt. Dat 20sec boot time :sogood:

    Watercooling is probably pricey and I don't know enough about it :erm: Might be that I go with fans.

    Hmm shall look into capture cards :holmes: streaming is a little way off yet though (more likely to be Voli/Hec/ZAC though )
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    (Original post by Iqbal007)
    Its where you modify the software which runs the processor to go faster then it does already.......... for example most people who an i5-3570k overclock to run at 4.5GHZ ish instead of the standard 3.6Ghz.
    So a significant increase in performance............however it comes with issues, a large increase in temperature which can degrade the components life, hence why people buy aftermarket coolers which are superior the standard one which give better cooling and hence lower temperature.

    Ease of doing overclocking varies on the motherboard, some come with software which makes it very easy to do so, it isn't necessary, but if you want to there will be plenty of guides online.

    Well an i7 is ideal for video editing.................. currently games are more and more optimising for usage on a quad core system, even console systems are.

    2tb will achievable on your budget as its only £15 more than a 1tb .

    Graphics card entirely depends on the games you wish to play........the best value for money I would say is a 7850 around £130-£140............... best general graphics in terms of performance, worth, cost is the GTX670 but its around £300.
    Cooling, aftermarket cooler which depends on whether overclocking or not. Case wise, a corsair 300r are will do, comes with 2 fans and you can stick an extra 2 x 120mm fans for better airflow.
    Fancy drawing up a sample build for me? So far we're settled on 2tb HDD, an SSD of some description, i7 processor, corsair 300r case - but I've no idea about brands or prices

    I think a rough list of all the components I need is a good start. Also aftermarket cooling sounds like a lot less hassle than watercooling so I'll probably go for that :yep:
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    (Original post by Artymess)
    Fancy drawing up a sample build for me? So far we're settled on 2tb HDD, an SSD of some description, i7 processor, corsair 300r case - but I've no idea about brands or prices

    I think a rough list of all the components I need is a good start. Also aftermarket cooling sounds like a lot less hassle than watercooling so I'll probably go for that :yep:
    cpu: i7-3770K http://www.amazon.co.uk/Intel-Genera...4849485&sr=1-1 £245.94, overclockable version
    mobo:Gigabyte GA-Z77-D3H http://www.ebuyer.com/351598-gigabyt...ard-ga-z77-d3h£80.30, best value mobo
    ram: Corsair Memory Vengeance Low Profile Jet Black 8GB http://www.scan.co.uk/products/8gb-(...nbuffered-cas- £48.96, you may need more than 8gb of ram as your video editing a lot.......also ram prices have suddenly gone up, used to be around £30 at one moment
    hdd: Seagate 2TB Barracuda Internal Hard Drive http://www.ebuyer.com/319641-seagate...ve-st2000dm001 £64.98
    SSD: Crucial CT128M4SSD1 128GB M4 http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/dp/B006MQQBYA?tag=invihand-21 £86.01, prices seem to have reason, the only other makers worth looking at are Intel and Samsung 830 or 840 pro and if you need more then check for 240-256gb ones
    case: Corsair Carbide 300R Case http://www.ebuyer.com/351501-corsair...-cc-9011014-ww £62, best case around for the price, highly regarded with good airflow, also make sure you like the look of it, another thing is cases are bigger then the ones at pcworld which are mATX cases, this is a Midi case....fans are One 140mm (front), one 120mm (rear)......with space for another 5
    psu: Corsair 750W CXM Builder Modular 80 Plus Bronze PSU 3 Year Warranty http://www.ebuyer.com/429987-corsair...-cp-9020061-uk £66.52, excellent value for money amazing deal though overkill
    optical drive:Liteon Ihas124 24x http://www.ebuyer.com/410560-liteon-...k-ihas124-19cu £13.94
    extra fans: Have a look on here for what kinda fans you want, prices vary, 300r case can get 12/14 cm fans http://www.ebuyer.com/search?subcat=1291&cat=125

    Total is : £668.65 but without aftermarket cpu cooler or a gpu

    Aftermarket cooler for the cpu is the same as having a pre-built water cooling system........only custom water coolers are an issue. It depends on whether you wanna overclock, if your not but want less temp and a quieter system then a decent one around £20 would do like a gelid tranquillo rev 2 or arctic cooling freezer 7.

    Missed out GPU, as I can't tell what you want.

    Also bare in mind in summer the new generation of Intel processors are out alongside a new socket and motherboard range.
    Also look at the case, make sure you like it, as theres a large selection of them.
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    (Original post by Artymess)
    So what advantages does the Pro version have over the standard one? As I said in the OP, I don't mind spending a bit more on quality components - but it has to be justified :sly:

    Or would you recommend that the standard SSD is suitable and built to last?
    (Original post by Intriguing Alias)
    The 840 is a reasonable amount slower than the 830, in fact on many benchmarks it's twice as slow as the 840 Pro - the 840 really is just a budget SSD and doesn't yield great performance at all.
    The pro does offer an additional 2 year warranty over the base model, and it is faster, but I am unconvinced about whether you will realistically see any performance increase in typical operation - without just reading and writing constantly to it.

    Whether you can afford the additional ~£50 to futureproof yourself is something you need to think about. Then again, paying £50 for 2 years additional warranty and thinking that you get added performance on top could swing it. £50 is like, 5% of the build cost, so maybe take the plunge.

    EDIT: Also consider what size SSD you want. 128GB are pretty cheap, but after you've installed the OS, there isn't that much room for games, so you'll be constantly installing/uninstalling them if you have a few you want to play. I've gone for the 256 and have 80GB available with a fair few games installed.
 
 
 
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