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    Just wondering do cameras work in space or is the technology affected by having no oxygen or no gravity
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    I think a digital camera should work fine in space, because it's completely solid and electrical.
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    Film works fine. Optically vacuum is very similar to air so your lenses will still focus. The apollo astronauts used adapted earth cameras to take photographs on the moon and there were movie cameras filming some of the rocket stage separations.

    Problems you might have include
    Radiation eventually 'fogging' the film and air-tight camera boxes bursting open with the pressure differential.
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    (More of a photographer response than a physics response. I did A-level physics but a lot of photography too).

    Gravity and oxygen will not affect a camera. Most of the optics within a lens are completely sealed, and there are only some small air gaps between the rear aperture of the lens and the film/sensor. In fact, the images would probably be better due to the lack of atmosphere which typically degrades images. They're mechanical and electrical pieces and cameras just work. One of the photographers on the ISS took several cameras and many lenses up with him. The reason you probably won't see stars in most astro shots (especially those on the moon) is simply to do with how the exposure is measured and not because they faked the landings. Spend an hour with a semi-professional camera and you'll realise that.

    The problems may occur from cosmic radiation and the such. Astronauts have reported seeing flashes in their vision, even with their eyes closed, because cosmic radiation has been flung through the ship and into their eyes and caused a flash when it hits the fluid in their eyeballs. Cosmic radiation could probably cause damage to CMOS sensors as it may overload the individual pixels on the sensor. In a best case scenario, the pixel will just overload (and produce a red pixel) or just die and produce a black pixel. Shielding might have to be used to protect things like Hubble for the same reason.


    All in all though, they should be fine. A gamma ray burst may fry the camera, but it would probably do a lot more damage to the astronauts whom are the primary concern anyway.
 
 
 
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