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Bring back the wolf? Good idea? Watch

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    So long ago the wolf was once a natural part of the Irish (and British) landscape. Sadly the presence of the English wiped them out.

    Could it be possible to export some wolves from Scandinavian and set them loose in the forests?

    I see a lot of protest from farmers to lazy to guard their sheep and the torries would likely end up having a cull after a couple of dead sheep appear.

    So if we can't get the wolves prehaps we could export the brown bear back from eastern Europe?

    I can already see the comments from the nanny-fanny liberals stating that 'there is no room', well who said anything about them going to England, pretty sure no right minded bear would want to go there anyway. Scotland, Wales and Ireland are among some of the least populated countries in Europe.

    Then the comments from 'ooohh what about the sheep' a wolf would be no more a threat than a fox and a bear would be zero threat. I find it funny this argument even exists considering that domestic dogs attack 210,000 a year in England alone yet there is no winging for a dog cull and here we are crying about sheep. Wolves without rabies tend not to kill, so provided that people take the correct approach to wild wolves, they shouldn't be anymore of a threat than domestic dogs.

    Would there be a chance of importing wolves and bears if not just one into Britian/Ireland again?
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    Introducing a predator capable of killing humans? Never going to happen. Domestic dogs and foxes are already a threat, particularly to small children.

    Also, whats to stop them going down the fox route, and becoming urbanised? I don't fancy coming face to face with a wolf rooting through my rubbish, no thank you.
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    (Original post by edithwashere)
    Introducing a predator capable of killing humans? Never going to happen. Domestic dogs and foxes are already a threat, particularly to small children.

    Also, whats to stop them going down the fox route, and becoming urbanised? I don't fancy coming face to face with a wolf rooting through my rubbish, no thank you.
    So you agree that there is no reason for bears not to be imported then?

    You do realise that a wolf is not just going to attack a human which is much bigger than itself right? When wolves attack people it is usually due to people treating it like a cute cuddly dog not a wild animal, the wolf learns to not fear humans and grow bolder and bolder before actually attacking. There have been over 200 wolf encounters in Germany that passed without harm to a human for example.
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    It might help with deer overpopulation and reduce the need for culling, but then people might not be happy that they've got less of a reason to go shooting.

    Edit: Just to clarify, I'm not in favour of shooting deer as a sport, just mentioning it as a reason people might be opposed to bringing back wolves. Also, my point regards the Scottish highlands etc, introducing wolves to well-populated areas of England would just be dangerous.
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    (Original post by bestofyou)
    So you agree that there is no reason for bears not to be imported then?

    You do realise that a wolf is not just going to attack a human which is much bigger than itself right? When wolves attack people it is usually due to people treating it like a cute cuddly dog not a wild animal, the wolf learns to not fear humans and grow bolder and bolder before actually attacking. There have been over 200 wolf encounters in Germany that passed without harm to a human for example.
    I'm perfectly aware that wolves don't attack humans as a frequent pass time, but it definitely happens. I grew up near a royal park, with deer in it, and every now and again some tourist would get gored by their antlers because they went over to cuddle it and it went beserk. People are idiots, we're not used to wolves in this country, there's a reason we got rid of them. The preservation of livestock is quite an important issue btw, people's livelihoods depend on them. And of course I don't sanction importing bears, where on earth did you get that idea from?

    If you want wolves, go to Scandinavia. There are loads there. But reintroducing a top predator into the wild, where other animals won't be aware of the sudden change to the food chain, is just silly. Aren't there other things for our government to worry about?
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    There has been talk about a re-introduction in the Scottish Highlands to counter the deer problems there I believe, although I read about that a while back, not sure if there's been any further development on the thought.
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    (Original post by Harley)
    It might help with deer overpopulation and reduce the need for culling, but then people might not be happy that they've got less of a reason to go shooting.
    I really don't sympathise that a few people have less of a reason to kill an animal for fun. I have nothing against hunting, just won't lose any sleep over there being less game for them.

    Besides, wolf hunting would likely be needed in order to keep wolves from approaching humans anyway, they can just switch to an animal that can defend itself a little better than deer.
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    (Original post by edithwashere)
    Introducing a predator capable of killing humans? Never going to happen. Domestic dogs and foxes are already a threat, particularly to small children.

    Also, whats to stop them going down the fox route, and becoming urbanised? I don't fancy coming face to face with a wolf rooting through my rubbish, no thank you.
    It sounds cliche but Wolves are generally more scared of us than we should be of them. I'd be all for introducing small, controlled populations in rural areas especially with the deer problem we have at the moment.
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    Yea why not?

    Bring them back and we can demonise them instead of the poor and disabled.
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    what would be the benefit of this? You say why not, then completely play down the actually rather large reasons why not, but what would be the point? Why would anyone want to do this what would be the gain?

    the poster above gave you an example of it being considered in a certain place because there was a good reason. Is there any actual reason to introduce them to other places? And why would you say "if not then bears" it doesn't follow at all.
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    (Original post by LeBuche)
    It sounds cliche but Wolves are generally more scared of us than we should be of them. I'd be all for introducing small, controlled populations in rural areas especially with the deer problem we have at the moment.

    I always thought this was just a fact.
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    (Original post by bestofyou)
    So long ago the wolf was once a natural part of the Irish (and British) landscape. Sadly the presence of the English wiped them out.

    Could it be possible to export some wolves from Scandinavian and set them loose in the forests?

    I see a lot of protest from farmers to lazy to guard their sheep and the torries would likely end up having a cull after a couple of dead sheep appear.

    So if we can't get the wolves prehaps we could export the brown bear back from eastern Europe?

    I can already see the comments from the nanny-fanny liberals stating that 'there is no room', well who said anything about them going to England, pretty sure no right minded bear would want to go there anyway. Scotland, Wales and Ireland are among some of the least populated countries in Europe.

    Then the comments from 'ooohh what about the sheep' a wolf would be no more a threat than a fox and a bear would be zero threat. I find it funny this argument even exists considering that domestic dogs attack 210,000 a year in England alone yet there is no winging for a dog cull and here we are crying about sheep. Wolves without rabies tend not to kill, so provided that people take the correct approach to wild wolves, they shouldn't be anymore of a threat than domestic dogs.

    Would there be a chance of importing wolves and bears if not just one into Britian/Ireland again?
    No we should not. I love bears and wolves are pretty cool however there is no chance. Translocation of a species greatly impacts the ecosystem in which it is placed.
    For a start, yes farmers will complain because their livelihood is their livestock! And I don't think it's a question of being lazy but do you know how difficult it would be to bear and wolf proof your fields?! Dogs that attack livestock are shot on sight if seen by the farmer as it is their right to do so.
    Wolves and bears will require high protein diets; since there are few medium/large sized mammals in the UK they will most likely be hungry and venture in to human inhabited areas. Where, if hungry, they will take a child.
    What about the animals that exist already? They've not had to deal with a predator like this and their population numbers could potentially plummet. Scottish Wildcats, for example, are endangered due to dilution of their genepool from breeding with domestic cats. Should a bear or a wolf come across a Wildcat it would stand little chance and their numbers would decline even more rapidly.
    As for introducing bears there is a lucrative illegal trade of bear parts (particularly bile) and bears all over the world suffer from poaching (and farming) for these parts. Bears in Asia and bears in America; whose to say the British wouldn't get greedy and also start illegally exploiting them?!

    There are many considerations other than "we used to have them so we should have them again". You have made little argument as to why you think it would be beneficial to re-introduce these species. All you've done is argue against a small number of things that people, rightfully so, may say.
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    (Original post by bestofyou)
    So long ago the wolf was once a natural part of the Irish (and British) landscape. Sadly the presence of the English wiped them out.

    Could it be possible to export some wolves from Scandinavian and set them loose in the forests?

    I see a lot of protest from farmers to lazy to guard their sheep and the torries would likely end up having a cull after a couple of dead sheep appear.

    So if we can't get the wolves prehaps we could export the brown bear back from eastern Europe?

    I can already see the comments from the nanny-fanny liberals stating that 'there is no room', well who said anything about them going to England, pretty sure no right minded bear would want to go there anyway. Scotland, Wales and Ireland are among some of the least populated countries in Europe.

    Then the comments from 'ooohh what about the sheep' a wolf would be no more a threat than a fox and a bear would be zero threat. I find it funny this argument even exists considering that domestic dogs attack 210,000 a year in England alone yet there is no winging for a dog cull and here we are crying about sheep. Wolves without rabies tend not to kill, so provided that people take the correct approach to wild wolves, they shouldn't be anymore of a threat than domestic dogs.

    Would there be a chance of importing wolves and bears if not just one into Britian/Ireland again?
    During 2012 year in Republic Yakutia the wolfs had killed 314 horses and over 16000 of home deers.
    http://www.rg.ru/2013/01/06/reg-dfo/volki-anons.html
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    (Original post by boba)
    what would be the benefit of this? You say why not, then completely play down the actually rather large reasons why not, but what would be the point? Why would anyone want to do this what would be the gain?

    the poster above gave you an example of it being considered in a certain place because there was a good reason. Is there any actual reason to introduce them to other places? And why would you say "if not then bears" it doesn't follow at all.
    Wouldn't agree with them being reintroduced in other places. England is too populated now for example. But there are certainly strong benefits to reintroducing them to parts of Scotland.
    The main two being there's a deer problem there.
    And also it'd be good for the tourism industry, and help financially.

    Obviously some farmers would worry due to livestock but as long as they take necessary precautions or if they were reimbursed damages dependant on losses.

    Also the they did used to be there naturally, so it'd be nice from a sentimental point of view to have them back. But that's just region specific, not sure about Ireland as such.

    Could also reintroduce Elk, lynx and bears, as there has been talk. Not sure on that happening. But certainly Wolves could be viable and beneficial.
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    What is your argument for doing so? I don't see you mentioning any upsides, yet there are many obvious potential downsides.
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    (Original post by edithwashere)
    I'm perfectly aware that wolves don't attack humans as a frequent pass time, but it definitely happens. I grew up near a royal park, with deer in it, and every now and again some tourist would get gored by their antlers because they went over to cuddle it and it went beserk. People are idiots, we're not used to wolves in this country, there's a reason we got rid of them. The preservation of livestock is quite an important issue btw, people's livelihoods depend on them. And of course I don't sanction importing bears, where on earth did you get that idea from?

    If you want wolves, go to Scandinavia. There are loads there. But reintroducing a top predator into the wild, where other animals won't be aware of the sudden change to the food chain, is just silly. Aren't there other things for our government to worry about?
    The reason for that is a lack of knowledge, if it actually happened, people would need to be educated from primary schools. Another thing is that wolfs are actually scared of humans. The ones that get too close and may potentially attack one day will show signs of it well in advance. Long enough for that wolf to me hunted and killed.

    Other animals can adapt. Survival of the fittest. There is a reason why there are over-populated animals about, because some genius had the bright idea to remove the top predator. Bringing it back is just restoring the natural order of things.


    (Original post by sophmay)
    No we should not. I love bears and wolves are pretty cool however there is no chance. Translocation of a species greatly impacts the ecosystem in which it is placed.
    For a start, yes farmers will complain because their livelihood is their livestock! And I don't think it's a question of being lazy but do you know how difficult it would be to bear and wolf proof your fields?! Dogs that attack livestock are shot on sight if seen by the farmer as it is their right to do so.
    Wolves and bears will require high protein diets; since there are few medium/large sized mammals in the UK they will most likely be hungry and venture in to human inhabited areas. Where, if hungry, they will take a child.
    What about the animals that exist already? They've not had to deal with a predator like this and their population numbers could potentially plummet. Scottish Wildcats, for example, are endangered due to dilution of their genepool from breeding with domestic cats. Should a bear or a wolf come across a Wildcat it would stand little chance and their numbers would decline even more rapidly.
    As for introducing bears there is a lucrative illegal trade of bear parts (particularly bile) and bears all over the world suffer from poaching (and farming) for these parts. Bears in Asia and bears in America; whose to say the British wouldn't get greedy and also start illegally exploiting them?!

    There are many considerations other than "we used to have them so we should have them again". You have made little argument as to why you think it would be beneficial to re-introduce these species. All you've done is argue against a small number of things that people, rightfully so, may say.
    Yip, absolutely right. Fed up with eating boring old deer which is plentiful, the wolves and bears will team up and enter an urban environment where they are outnumbered by a population of a much bigger and smarter animal and single out the small child which has been conveniently abandoned on the side of the road...

    There are farms in Australia bigger than Wales yet the Australians are able to deal with the dingos just fine. If a farmer is incapable of defending a tiny area of quite few sheep (in comparison) then that is down to lazyness due to not taking enough precautions.
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    Btw, my district of Moscow Oblast borders with three large regions, in the forests of which the number of brown bears continues to grow. So I think that in several years one day I may meet one in the forest, collecting mushrooms as usual. I hope the bear won't be hungry.
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    Sorry for my English. I'll collect mushrooms as usual, not the bear.
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    (Original post by edithwashere)
    I'm perfectly aware that wolves don't attack humans as a frequent pass time, but it definitely happens. I grew up near a royal park, with deer in it, and every now and again some tourist would get gored by their antlers because they went over to cuddle it and it went beserk. People are idiots, we're not used to wolves in this country, there's a reason we got rid of them. The preservation of livestock is quite an important issue btw, people's livelihoods depend on them. And of course I don't sanction importing bears, where on earth did you get that idea from?

    If you want wolves, go to Scandinavia. There are loads there. But reintroducing a top predator into the wild, where other animals won't be aware of the sudden change to the food chain, is just silly. Aren't there other things for our government to worry about?
    Introducing a top predator especially a natural one tends to stabilise populations. This is one of the reasons it has been suggested because other reintroduction programs or endangered species are struggling due to deer over population and introducing a predator would resolve that.

    If we stopped anything happening because some retard once did something stupid and paid the consequences nothing would ever happen. Also in the past 13 years across the world only 20 people have been killed by wolves.

    Also the government can do more than one thing at a time. Yes preservation of livestock is an important issue but other countries can have farms and wolves in the same area just fine, we can do it too.
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    (Original post by Tweek)
    Wouldn't agree with them being reintroduced in other places. England is too populated now for example. But there are certainly strong benefits to reintroducing them to parts of Scotland.
    The main two being there's a deer problem there.
    And also it'd be good for the tourism industry, and help financially.

    Obviously some farmers would worry due to livestock but as long as they take necessary precautions or if they were reimbursed damages dependant on losses.

    Also the they did used to be there naturally, so it'd be nice from a sentimental point of view to have them back. But that's just region specific, not sure about Ireland as such.

    Could also reintroduce Elk, lynx and bears, as there has been talk. Not sure on that happening. But certainly Wolves could be viable and beneficial.
    So did polar bears, should we bring those back too?

    As for people talking about it being a measure to control the deer population, why don't we instead promote a market for venision and allow for restricted levels of hunting to take place?
 
 
 
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