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    (Original post by Swist)
    I'm coming to the end of an Access to Medicine course.

    We study Chemistry, Biology and Physics as the core subjects, we then have epidemiology, statistics and a project/mini-dissertation to complete as well.

    It is fairly intensive, with regards to the workload, but that's to be expected. There was a small period of adjustment, where time management and revision had to be gotten used to again, but on the whole it was mostly painless. I've received two offers to study medicine, which makes it all seem very worthwhile.
    Hey... Where did you do your access course? What did you do before the course And what experience do you have? (Sorry for bombarding you with so many questions) lol
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    (Original post by lauren45)
    I did an access course in business studies and i did it in 4 months at Bolton Uni full time. There was quite a lot of work and assignments but it was fine and i got help when i needed it ! i also did a levels and dropped out and its nothing like A levels i much prefer the access course x
    That's a relief!I've been told my some people that access courses are unbearable but i guess that's their own preference.Thank you! x
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    (Original post by Knalchemist)
    I did an Access Course. Most of it was coursework based, although I did have exams in English and Maths. It was quite intensive, there is quite a bit of work, and lots of deadlines around the same time - which helped prepare me for university.

    Most universities, if not all, accept the access course - even the higher ranked ones. (I've seen people get accepted in to both Oxford and Cambridge, as well as UCL, Kings etc with an access course).

    It is a one year course but you do quite a few subjects. I did History, Sociology, Psychology, IT, English, Maths and Study Skills - mine was a 'humanities' access to he course. They are the same level as A Levels.

    I study Law now at University. Though I'm currently transferring to another one in September to start my degree again at a much better university (1994 group).
    Okay yeah i'm hoping to do Law at Kings & i do know they accept access courses but i figured since it's just one year it might be much harder but im someone who gets their work done by deadlines anyway so it shouldn't be a problem.But thanks for replying! x
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    I'm currently on an Access course and I would wholeheartedly recommend it so long as you know you have the determination. We started off with a class of around 20, and this has gone down to about 10 now, and many of the people who dropped out did so due to having too many commitments outside of college, or just through laziness... and they were all extremely bright with bags of potential. So yeah, I guess it's up to you to decide whether you think you can handle intensive study and if you're 100% motivated about going to university.
    All universities accept the qualification, although entry requirements do vary and some are much more stricter than others and this is sometimes because they don't understand the grading of Access courses, but generally it isn't a problem. Good luck!
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    I'm currently on an Access humanities course which ends in June. We are studying law, politics, English literature, sociology and psychology as the main core subjects. We also gain credits in IT and study skills and are able to retake our English or math gcses if needed. We do essays, exams and research projects to gain our credits. I could not recommend this option enough. I'm 24 and have been working the last few years and totally ready for a change. I'm so glad I decided to apply for it last year, especially as if I started this September, I would have had to pay the new course fees of (proposed) £3000 for age 24+!! I have firmed and insured places at Manchester and Cardiff, which shows that 'top' universities recognise and accept the course. I do agree you need dedication, had about 7 drop outs, and the workload is intense (we have 2 essays, 2 research projects and a presentation to complete over the easter holidays!). I think it probably prepares you better for university than A levels, the style of producing work is different and more like university work. I say apply today! At 19 you still have plenty of time to do something else if it doesn't quite suit you. It's definitely worth a try
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    I am also hoping to do access course in September, with a view to study law in the future. Been trying to find as much info about it. Very keen to get into it. been offered a place at the college i'm at but really want to do access at uni. Hoping it will be a better standard of learning and prepare me more for undergraduate study.
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    I'm just finishing an Access to HE diploma at my local college. I was worried about my chances of getting University places when I started, but honestly it's been the best thing I've EVER done.

    I had GCSEs and one A-level that I'd taken from home due to health. I went into the course wondering whether I'd be able to do it, but as long as you put the work in then you will enjoy it.

    It's a pretty heavy work load but not undo-able. I'm doing Study Skills, English Literature, Psychology, Sociology and Biology alongside Maths. I spend most of my spare time reading for the course, or preparing for assignments, but on the plus side I've got distinctions in everything. If you put the work in, you get the results. I applied to The University of Bath, The University of Worcester, University of Gloucestershire and The University of West of England (UWE in Bristol). I got offers from all of them, which astounded me because my brother who is 11 years younger than me, got very high grades at A-level and ONLY JUST got a place at Bath. It was voted best Uni by The Times last year and it's where the Olympic sportspeople train! So access courses DO prepare you for Uni, and they stand you in good stead for places at Uni.

    Seriously - it's an amazing way to learn. The teachers have all been superb and totally different to my school teachers. The work has mostly been very interesting, and the assessments have been different and great experience. Talking to tutors on visit days at Unis, they really do count Access courses as a great qualification and they LOVE mature students who know what they want to do, and are focused and motivated to achieve.

    Go for it. You get out what you put in - if you want it badly, you'll do well and you'll be a Uni student in a years time! I can't believe that less than a year ago I was working in a low paid job, not having any idea I was intelligent enough to get a Uni place, and now here I am with offers from all of the Uni's I applied to, and a place waiting for me in September which I KNOW I can take up because I've already got all of the points I need without even finishing the last assessments! SOOOO amazing. Try it and find out what you can do.....I can't recommend them more!
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    I did access and 2 GCSE's.

    Social science which involves psychology, social psychology, sociology of health, social policy and procedure, sociology and access project (mini dissertation) also at level 2 maths, English, study study skills and IT.

    There are 2 different access courses run at the college I attend and everyone that has complete and applied to uni has a place! Definitely worth doing. I've found the whole thing interesting. An excellent way to learn.

    Workload is manageable. I really would recommend it


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    I'm nearing the end of my Access course and as long as you're disciplined then you should be fine. There is a clear divide in my class between those of us that are disciplined and stay on top of the work and those that aren't disciplined. Some people haven't handed in any assignments all year! They now have a couple of months to get around 12 or so assignments done. It can be a very intensive course but you have to remember that you're doing the course because you want to go to university. That should be enough motivation to stay on top of things.
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    Its good to hear from people who have done them. I applied for a few courses for this year, one is access to health and biological science. No interview yet though, if i don't get in this year then I'll keep trying!
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    Hi,

    All the advise I am about to give you, is most likely what you will not want to hear however it is probably the most honest answer.

    Access courses are rewarding, and are great, ONLY if you are consistent, work hard and want to achieve. They are not their for a quick short cut to university, if you want to go to university to study anything less academic grades required (Not medicine/dentistry/health), then I would suggest studying a BTEC level 2/3, in which you can have plenty of help from the teachers and trying to get many distinctions to get to university.

    If your still reading this post and thinking, I am dedicated, motivated and I am willing to work hard throughout the year, then please read on.

    I will give you the example of myself, I am studying an Access course this year and have applied to university for September. I think I read, that you wanted to apply for Law at university, so this will be most relevant to yourself, seeing as I have also applied to study Law at university.

    In my college, they're are 27 units that are taught across from September to July (we finish in May, and if you are up to date, in which you should be). They're are 3 credits per unit. 27 units x 3 = 81 credits in total. 23 of them units are taught at level 3, and 4 units at taught at level 2 (maximum grade is level 2).

    Some colleges have 6 credits per unit, or even 9, however in them colleges, not every unit will amount to them high amounts of credits, best way to think about it, the more credits, the harder the work (even though you still have to study really hard to get distinctions/merits at 3 credits a piece).

    To pass an access course, you will need 45 of them credits at level 3 (15 units, if we are going by my college), and 15 credits at level 2, minimum. Anything less and you will not pass the access course. Units can come in the following grades, : Referral (Fail), Level 2, Level 3 (Pass, Merit, Distinction). To get a level 3 Pass, you just need to attend college and pay attention/understand the work and finish your assignment. To get a level 3 Merit, you need to do all the things for a Pass INCLUDING Extra research, working in depth or breath. To get a level 3 Distinction, you need to do all the things for a Pass & Merit INCLUDING all extra sources of information, working in depth AND breath, knowing all the various types of cases out their and to work beyond the call of duty.

    SOME university courses, require you to only have a pass and that is fine. However you can still get an offer for a pass from a university and then aim for Merits & Distinctions to put on your CV, maybe for a bursary at that university.

    Law LLB, depending on where you want to study WILL NOT BE AVAILABLE at university just on a pass. Some university's ask for a pass INCLUDING 18 credits at Merit (6 units at Merit). Then you will have the redbrick/ Russell group university's such as University of Birmingham asking for a pass INCLUDING 30 credits at Distinction (10 units at Distinction) and 15 credits at Merit (5 units at Merit).

    To put the University of Birmingham offer into context, a typical offer for Law LLB last year with A levels was AAA, and this year it has stayed the same. Last year's Law LLB offer for access courses was, 24 credits at Distinction (8 units) and 15 credits at Merit (5 units). If we call them grades an equivalency of AAA. This year's offer is, 30 credits at Distinction (10 units) and 15 credits at Merit (5 units). Then the equivalency of these grades to A level will probably be A*AA?. All this is not even accounting to the LNAT test which is required to receive an offer from 10 redbrick/Russell group universities.

    It is very TOUGH. When we started off the year, there was 35+ people in our class and there was a 2nd list of people who were substitutes in case people dropped out. 6 weeksish we have left and we have only 6 people left. Seriously, it is tough.

    Many of my friends have applied to University of Birmingham like me, (staying in Birmingham because of family/work commitments as usual mature students), and they have offers like 30 credits at Distinction (10 units) and they currently have only 12 credits at Distinction (4 units). Because it is too late towards the end of the year, they have wished they could go back and redo work to the best of their ability.

    If you are still going to apply to an Access Course, here are some top tips for you guys.

    TOP TIPS

    1)Make a list of all the courses you wish to do
    2)Ring all the universities you wish to attend and inquire about their courses
    A)Ask them, If I am studying an Access course in .... (Combined Studies?), then how many credits, grades will I require to study my chosen degree?
    B)Ask them, Will I be required to take any external exams, which will not be supplied on my Access course, (For Law, LNAT Exam, which has nothing to do with Access course)? and what grade will I need for that? If so, what deadline will I have to achieve this by?
    C)Ask them, Will I need GCSE's alongside my Access course? Science? English? Maths? Will I need 5 GCSE's above C? (For teachers, you will need C in Maths & English, if you want to do an Education degree I believe)
    D)Ask them, Do I have to study a specific Access course? or can I study a generic Access course? (For health related studies, you need to study a health related Access course due to the information related degree, however for Law, there is Access to Law, but you do not need any Law information to study a Law degree (just like A level students)
    3)Ring your college and ask them, if they tailor your access course to any degree subjects?

    4)Make a monthly routine, NOW before you start college in September, to see how it feels like when you are a student. Monday-Friday 9.00am-3.00pm, are you free? or are you always doing something, which when September comes up, you can't be doing because you will be in college. Can you sort out school runs, because you have children to pick up and drop off and your college does not cater to start after 9.15am and finish before 3pm.
    5)Read up, write a report yourself on anything, anything your interested in, so when you start in September, you aren't boggled in which way a PC starts.
    6)If you are not computer literate, get your family members to show you a few tips and tricks on how to make a Word document, Excel document, Powerpoint document. People on my course depending on getting Distinction grades in ICT modules and they have never used a PC before/struggling to login with their details.

    Access course's DONT DO GCSE's, they do equivalents, they are like half GCSE's. However, if you find this information out prior, then you could maybe do a night class, to get the grades you require.

    Everyone loves Access courses because you can complete the course in a year and then get to university, without the ALTERNATIVE ROUTE of studying 3/4 A levels across 2 years. But do you realise, that means you will be studying and handing in 5 to 6 assignments in 1 go EVERY 5-6 weeks.

    E.g, I am towards the end of my assignment and this is how my current week went.

    Monday AM - English Report (4000 Words)
    Monday PM - English Literature (Powerpoint Assignment)
    Tuesday AM - Psychology Report x2 (3500 Words)
    Tuesday PM - Maths Report x4
    Thursday AM - Biology Exam
    Thursday PM - ICT Reports x2

    You will have an average of 4/5 weeks to slowly get work done, and then you will have a headache/stressful week of handing things in. IF YOU ARE LAZY/NOT STUDYING and prefer to do "All nighters/night before" then you will have a stressful year. Believe Me.

    Sorry for scaring you all away, off an Access course. I have read all the comments on this thread, and all the other threads related to an Access course over the course of the year and have not found "real" information, that I have stated and if it is said, it is not emphasized.

    To get all my Good karma back;

    If you need help related to an Access Course, Feel free to message me,
    If you need help related to an application to study Law at university, Feel free to message me,
    Anything about what ever I messaged above, good or bad feedback, I welcome them.

    P.S, if someone disagrees, or wants to neg, please quote and post anything I have said, which is wrong.

    Thanks, Peace. Hopefully I have informed you with the correct information to make a correct decision which will affect your future.
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    (Original post by Oldiebutgoodie)
    I am also hoping to do access course in September, with a view to study law in the future. Been trying to find as much info about it. Very keen to get into it. been offered a place at the college i'm at but really want to do access at uni. Hoping it will be a better standard of learning and prepare me more for undergraduate study.
    PM Me, if you would like any help in trying to apply to Law.
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    (Original post by Jennienarwin)
    Okay yeah i'm hoping to do Law at Kings & i do know they accept access courses but i figured since it's just one year it might be much harder but im someone who gets their work done by deadlines anyway so it shouldn't be a problem.But thanks for replying! x
    PM Me, if you would like any help in trying to apply to Law.
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    (Original post by Knalchemist)
    I did an Access Course. Most of it was coursework based, although I did have exams in English and Maths. It was quite intensive, there is quite a bit of work, and lots of deadlines around the same time - which helped prepare me for university.

    Most universities, if not all, accept the access course - even the higher ranked ones. (I've seen people get accepted in to both Oxford and Cambridge, as well as UCL, Kings etc with an access course).

    It is a one year course but you do quite a few subjects. I did History, Sociology, Psychology, IT, English, Maths and Study Skills - mine was a 'humanities' access to he course. They are the same level as A Levels.

    I study Law now at University. Though I'm currently transferring to another one in September to start my degree again at a much better university (1994 group).
    Hi,

    Wish university do you study at now and which university are you transferring to? If you do not mind me asking.

    I am applying for University of Birmingham, Aston Uni and Birmingham City university.

    Thanks in advance.
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    Just for my own curiosity, do you have to pay tuition fees for a Access Course? I have to admit, I have never heard of them before I applied to study at HE at Christmas.
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    (Original post by CelticSymphony67)
    Just for my own curiosity, do you have to pay tuition fees for a Access Course? I have to admit, I have never heard of them before I applied to study at HE at Christmas.
    Apparently, the year I am studying, this year will have been the last year to be funded by the government.

    Apparently, from next year on, this September 2013, you will have to apply to some kind of loan (like student finance), and if you go on to university then you will not have to pay or something and if you drop out, you will have to pay the loan.

    All of this is speculation on a few things I have heard throughout the year. Best thing is to ask the college you are applying to.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Jiraya Sama)
    Apparently, the year I am studying, this year will have been the last year to be funded by the government.

    Apparently, from next year on, this September 2013, you will have to apply to some kind of loan (like student finance), and if you go on to university then you will not have to pay or something and if you drop out, you will have to pay the loan.

    All of this is speculation on a few things I have heard throughout the year. Best thing is to ask the college you are applying to.

    Thanks
    Cheers. It is for a pal of mine. She is thinking about going back into education, but she does to have the qualifications to go straight in and do a degree. I have just had a read about these Access Courses and you are correct. From this year, you have to apply for a loan called an 'Advanced Learning Loan' and it works the same way as when you apply to SFE for Tuition Loans, and you pay back the ALL the same way too.
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    (Original post by Jiraya Sama)
    Apparently, the year I am studying, this year will have been the last year to be funded by the government.

    Apparently, from next year on, this September 2013, you will have to apply to some kind of loan (like student finance), and if you go on to university then you will not have to pay or something and if you drop out, you will have to pay the loan.

    All of this is speculation on a few things I have heard throughout the year. Best thing is to ask the college you are applying to.

    Thanks
    That is true: http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/...-loans-funding
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    (Original post by CelticSymphony67)
    Cheers. It is for a pal of mine. She is thinking about going back into education, but she does to have the qualifications to go straight in and do a degree. I have just had a read about these Access Courses and you are correct. From this year, you have to apply for a loan called an 'Advanced Learning Loan' and it works the same way as when you apply to SFE for Tuition Loans, and you pay back the ALL the same way too.
    Thanks for that, I think a fellow poster has linked more information in the post above.

    No problemo.
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    How you doing? Long time no speak.

    How have you been fairing in your course. Gained many credits? Many more to go for your chosen university?

    I need another 4 Distinctions and 2 Merits For University of Birmingham to study Law.

    I won't miss our college lol
 
 
 
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