Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hello there,

    I am in the final year of my Chemistry degree course and I would like to apply for a PhD in the area of theoretical/computational chemistry at either Oxbridge or Durham.
    I am finishing with 80+ average and I've had a year of computational chemistry experience applied to drug discovery (industrial year) at a one of the top 5 pharmaceutical companies in the world and about 4 months worth of experience doing computational and theoretical chemistry research at my university.

    What are chances of getting funding and be accepted by any of these 3 institutions?

    Thank you.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I would say that you would have an excellent chance of being chosen by a supervisor as a potential PhD student. The problem would be funding: each department would have a limit to how many PhD students they can take on that year. After a supervisor picks you as his candidate, you'll have an interview with the department which would determine your rank against the candidates of all the other supervisors. Then they'll go down the list until funding runs out. This can always be a bit of a lottery, as it depends on the strength of candidates that aren't even applying for your PhD.

    You should definitely feel confident going for it because (1) there are other forms of funding and (2) with your profile I'm sure you'll stand a good chance of getting funding.

    Finally, remember that it is more important to find the right supervisor than it is to go to the more prestigious university; I know you haven't indicated that you're not aware of this, but just a reminder

    EDIT: You don't have much chance at all of starting a PhD this September/October though, I think that this would have been decided a couple of months ago, but I'm not too sure. My post was considering someone applying for 2014/15.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thank you so much for your reply!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    What about London - Imperial? Or Bristol? Both v good chem depts


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Those would also be very good options, thank you. Although I find London massively expensive to live in. And, in a way, I am not sure if I can apply for more than 3 places because: say that I apply for all 5; that would mean travelling to 5 different places by train/coach. I am not sure if I can afford the costs... even if they do pay me back... Tpx was saying that most important thing is to find a good supervisor rather than a good university as such. I agree with that. Is there a website that I could use to compare supervisors? Perhaps on the basis of how published one is?

    Thank you.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Go to the chem dept websites of leading universities and they will be organised along research themes. Find people working in areas you like and perhaps send a few well considered emails to the leading people or post grad admissions tutors. They would refund travel costs for interviews so that's not a consideration. London students are given higher funding to compensate living costs.


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thank you for your reply . Regarding oxbridge, I've been told that, in terms of undergraduate courses, some colleges are easy to get into than others. Is it the same for PhD application? Does the college choice have an impact upon how hard or how easy it is to be accepted and funded?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I'm sure that some colleges are easier to get into for postgrads as well, but as far as I know, this has no effect being accepted for anything else. Its seems that you apply for the three things completely separately: department, college, and funding.

    Also, I believe that you hand in a list of preferred colleges. If you are accepted by the department and for funding, I think that they definitely find you a college. Your first preferences may not have space, but one will take you. The college part is far less important for you than for undergrads; I don't think that you are even required give a list of preferred colleges.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Some wealthier Oxbridge colleges may have their own studentships but these are v hard to come by - you might be lucky though. You'd need to check their websites for info on how to apply. But it's correct that admission is a separate hurdle from receiving funding.


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by danchemuk)
    Although I find London massively expensive to live in.
    Oxford is also very expensive, for what it's worth — and, as a DPhil student, you wouldn't have the shorter terms to keep the cost down.

    Is there a website that I could use to compare supervisors? Perhaps on the basis of how published one is?
    Your best bet might be to just make a list and look at all of their research group pages to see what's been coming out recently.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.