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How to fix the problems in UK politics? Watch

  • View Poll Results: How to improve UK politics? (you can choose more than one)
    Make manifesto's legally binding
    9
    25.00%
    Make voting compulsory (like it is in Australia)
    7
    19.44%
    Teach school children the importance of voting
    17
    47.22%
    Less Career politicians
    19
    52.78%
    Get more people with real experience into politics
    19
    52.78%
    Change the voting system? (Maybe proportional representation)
    13
    36.11%
    Allow the public to vote for PM and Cabinet ministers independently (I.e we could have say Boris as PM and Alistair Darling as Chancellor)
    8
    22.22%
    Introduce an English Parliament
    10
    27.78%
    Make the Lords independent of party politics-I.e new members needs a majority vote in parliament or a mini referendum
    5
    13.89%
    Introduce referendums for any major issue issues( like they do in Switzerland)
    12
    33.33%
    An EU referendum
    13
    36.11%
    Turning the UK into a federal government of 4 quasi-independent states
    6
    16.67%
    Other (please state)
    3
    8.33%

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    Personally I think one of the problems with UK politics is we have too many career politicians-we need to have say former teachers/lecturers working in the department of Education

    I think we should also teach the importance of voting in schools and increasing knowledge of how the political system works in this country

    I once heard someone say we should make political manifesto's legally binding! I think there could be some pitfalls but this would certainly increase trust in politicians!
    If this was applied retrospectively-many MPs and governments would have been impeached!

    Discuss
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    Some of the suggestions are good, some are bad, and some are good in certain combinations.

    Make manifesto's legally binding - main problem is feasibility. Taken to extremes, what happens if a party which promised to both balance the budget and reduce all taxes to a 1% rate? Obviously that's impossible, so what happens?

    Make voting compulsory (like it is in Australia) - From a civil liberties point of view, I'm against.

    Teach school children the importance of voting - Well, as an anarchist I'd still oppose that, but I'd expect states to do that sort of thing.

    Less Career politicians - Agreed, but we need more decentralisation of power for that.

    Get more people with real experience into politics - ditto.

    Change the voting system? (Maybe proportional representation) - Definitely.

    Allow the public to vote for PM and Cabinet ministers independently - this would require massive constitutional change. At present the government has to pass laws through Parliament in order to do anything; suppose we implemented this, and elected some Tory and some Labour ministers, but then in the general election, Labour won a majority in Parliament anyway. They could then just ignore the Tory ministers. The only way round this would be switching to a US-style codified constitution which would give ministers powers in their own right.

    Introduce an English Parliament - I'd rather see regional assemblies tbh, I find the idea of a separate parliament representing >80% of the people represented in the main parliament a bit daft.

    Make the Lords independent of party politics-I.e new members needs a majority vote in parliament or a mini referendum - Surely a parliamentary vote would make it more partisan?

    Introduce referendums for any major issue issues( like they do in Switzerland) - Hmmm, not so sure, Switzerland is a much smaller, much more decentralised country. But I'd support this at a regional or local level.

    An EU referendum - Agreed, but I'd want this to be planned well in advance so all the proper information can be distributed (and I'm anti-EU, just to be clear).

    Turning the UK into a federal government of 4 quasi-independent states - Think I've covered this already in earlier posts.

    Other - If we're keeping FPTP (I'd rather have PR), I'd like to see an unconditional right of recall for MPs. Plenty of other things too but it seems you want to restrict this to constitutional issues, so I'll stick with that.
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    (Original post by anarchism101)
    Some of the suggestions are good, some are bad, and some are good in certain combinations.

    Make manifesto's legally binding - main problem is feasibility. Taken to extremes, what happens if a party which promised to both balance the budget and reduce all taxes to a 1% rate? Obviously that's impossible, so what happens?

    Make voting compulsory (like it is in Australia) - From a civil liberties point of view, I'm against.

    Teach school children the importance of voting - Well, as an anarchist I'd still oppose that, but I'd expect states to do that sort of thing.

    Less Career politicians - Agreed, but we need more decentralisation of power for that.

    Get more people with real experience into politics - ditto.

    Change the voting system? (Maybe proportional representation) - Definitely.

    Allow the public to vote for PM and Cabinet ministers independently - this would require massive constitutional change. At present the government has to pass laws through Parliament in order to do anything; suppose we implemented this, and elected some Tory and some Labour ministers, but then in the general election, Labour won a majority in Parliament anyway. They could then just ignore the Tory ministers. The only way round this would be switching to a US-style codified constitution which would give ministers powers in their own right.

    Introduce an English Parliament - I'd rather see regional assemblies tbh, I find the idea of a separate parliament representing >80% of the people represented in the main parliament a bit daft.

    Make the Lords independent of party politics-I.e new members needs a majority vote in parliament or a mini referendum - Surely a parliamentary vote would make it more partisan?

    Introduce referendums for any major issue issues( like they do in Switzerland) - Hmmm, not so sure, Switzerland is a much smaller, much more decentralised country. But I'd support this at a regional or local level.

    An EU referendum - Agreed, but I'd want this to be planned well in advance so all the proper information can be distributed (and I'm anti-EU, just to be clear).

    Turning the UK into a federal government of 4 quasi-independent states - Think I've covered this already in earlier posts.

    Other - If we're keeping FPTP (I'd rather have PR), I'd like to see an unconditional right of recall for MPs. Plenty of other things too but it seems you want to restrict this to constitutional issues, so I'll stick with that.
    Please elaborate on the other'I wasn't restricting the debate to constitutional reform at all

    You mentioned some good points-I can't reply in detail till I use a computer rather than my phone

    It would be good to get the best person for the job regardless of their party allegiance
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    Change the constitution; have a government with limited and enumerated powers only, with the responsibility of providing police, the armed forces, courts and preventing negative externalities only. Everything else should be reserved to the people and the free market.
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    Change the constitution; have a government with limited and enumerated powers only, with the responsibility of providing police, the armed forces, courts and preventing negative externalities only. Everything else should be reserved to the people and the free market.
    Don't forget health and education

    The USA health care system is horribly expensive and also contributes to the USA having a relatively low life expectancy for a developed country
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    If you had said "relevant" rather than "real" I would have ticked 5
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    (Original post by a729)
    Don't forget health and education

    The USA health care system is horribly expensive and also contributes to the USA having a relatively low life expectancy for a developed country
    I don't think the government should provide either of those - I deliberately left them out.
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    I don't think any of the options at hand would fix the problems. I'm not sure what will, really.
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    Make sitting members of Parliament ineligible to stand for election; effectively you ban consecutive terms, but not multiple terms. Politicians would either have to pursue a political career in many different levels and agencies, not just chasing a seat in Parliament, or a term in Parliament would have to be one episode in a broader career.

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    Change the voting system, less career politicians and have people who have actually worked (in a normal job, not the city).

    Basically let's have John Major back.
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    I've never understood this obsession with 'Career Politicians.'

    You don't get complaints about 'Career Teachers', 'Career Police' or 'Career Managers.'

    I'd rather have someone in the job that has worked at it for 20 years, understands it and so on than Joe Bloggs in power just because he owned a small business for a bit.
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    (Original post by Steevee)
    I've never understood this obsession with 'Career Politicians.'

    You don't get complaints about 'Career Teachers', 'Career Police' or 'Career Managers.'

    I'd rather have someone in the job that has worked at it for 20 years, understands it and so on than Joe Bloggs in power just because he owned a small business for a bit.
    That's a poor parallel though.

    Teachers effectively have to teach rote learning from a book and police have to be aware of what is and is not illegal then act upon it.

    A CEO of a large company is a decent comparison however politicians have to manage huge amounts of policy areas and are often guided by very little other than a core political ideology. I too would like politicians of political experience but before that point i think it would beneficial if they had worked outside politics for 5-10 years and actually had what i would consider some real world experience and that's before we tackle the fact that we have a Chancellor who studied History rather than Economics.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    That's a poor parallel though.

    Teachers effectively have to teach rote learning from a book and police have to be aware of what is and is not illegal then act upon it.

    A CEO of a large company is a decent comparison however politicians have to manage huge amounts of policy areas and are often guided by very little other than a core political ideology. I too would like politicians of political experience but before that point i think it would beneficial if they had worked outside politics for 5-10 years and actually had what i would consider some real world experience and that's before we tackle the fact that we have a Chancellor who studied History rather than Economics.
    I agree to an extent, but I really don't believe ideology is a main factor in policy these days, it is a factor, but not to some great extent that it wouldn't be if it were not a career politician in the same seat.

    And there's the whole point that under the Politicians, we have the Civil Service, it's not as if these politicians exist in a vacuum. I think there can be any route into politics, I just find it silly that people will complain about career politicians and ask after working people with 'real life' experience as if that makes them any more qualified than the average MP. 'Life Experience' is this meaningless catchphrase thrown around by a lot of people I know and it irks me.
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    (Original post by Steevee)
    I've never understood this obsession with 'Career Politicians.'

    You don't get complaints about 'Career Teachers', 'Career Police' or 'Career Managers.'

    I'd rather have someone in the job that has worked at it for 20 years, understands it and so on than Joe Bloggs in power just because he owned a small business for a bit.

    Hmm but it's possible to run a business or something and be involved in local politics

    Anyhow I think some politicians are 'out of touch'
    I mean I wouldn't want Ed Milliband ad PM just because he's been a politician for years!
    All that politics experience didn't help Brown be a good PM!
    Especially his 'bigot' comment!
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    Make manifesto's legally binding - spot on and they need to be specific promises that can be measured and verified - if they are stupid enough to promise impossible things and fail to deliver them then expect to be prosecuted.

    Less Career politicians - This is so important - today many leave university, become a researcher in parliament and then an MP. No obvious experience of working in the real economy. I'd like to see a requirement for 10 years working outside politics before you can become an MP.

    Change the voting system? Proportional representation so the main parties have to appeal to the whole country and not just the 100,000 votes in the marginal seats. I think this would bring back wider differences between Tories and Labour. Allows marginal parties more opportunities to get seats in parliament too.

    Introduce an English Parliament - No - needs to be a smaller size than that (like regional assemblies suggested earlier).

    Introduce referendums for any major issue issues (like they do in Switzerland) - I agree. Would we still have trident or be members of the EU (which is a completely different beast to the one we elected on in the 1970s) if this had happened in the past?
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    Teaching people the importance of voting/forcing people to vote won't improve the situation of our countries politics.

    I suggest we actually try and educate the public so they'd vote in someone better than the people we already have to look forward to... :/
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    I honestly think that the only real solution is to make any organized political parties illegal. If all MP's were independents, they'd be able to go along with whatever was best for their constituency, rather than what the party leadership thought it was. They'd have to keep their promises to their constituents, because the threat of being voted out of office would be a very real one indeed. And to find out what was best for their constituency, they'd have to actually have some experience in the community - or at least listen to someone who did.

    It would be more difficult to make any radical changes, but since MP's would eventually be forced to agree on a reasonable compromise for most issues then it's not often that such radical changes would be needed anyway.
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    Getting rid of this Coalition Government wouldn't be a bad start.
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    To solve the problems in UK politics you would need more than just getting rid of the professional politician class. I would suggest:

    - A population that becomes engaged with real issues not pseudo issues

    - The ability for people to question things and think beyond the presentation

    - For people to think in terms of us being multi facets creatures and to stop thinking one dimensionally and in a kind of "matrix" e.g. Just economic analysts or believing TV Iran war propaganda

    - A population who are prepared to be objective and possibly rejected they historical ideological ties in favour if actual analysis.

    - A population that will stop being hypocrites

    - Get people who individually hear people out and stop buying into social prejudices e.g. Someone in a workplace saying "those UKIP nutters" because it would not be politically correct to say otherwise. People need to stop being automatons on repeat and start using their brains.

    - A population that want to use some effort to be part of the solution not part of the problem e.g. Only consider benefits as a last resort not a general income choice.




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    Less Career politicians is my number one. If you've been to private school, oxbridge, then straight into Parliament, all you've ever known is silver spoon and politics. We need more real people, more people from the lesser jobs, the real world. I am begrudged to admit, Nadine Dorries was right.
 
 
 
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