Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    So I'm applying for a teaching position at my uni, and one thing we are asked to write a brief summary of is what makes a bad maths question. Now I've got some ideas myself, but was wondering if anyone could give me there input so I can get a more general idea, as obviously opinions will differ on this.

    My ideas: It's ambiguous in it's wording. It doesn't require the mathematician to think or stretch them in any particular way.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    No answer
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    No answer
    How did I miss that one! aha. Thanks for contributing any others, this is actually surprisingly hard to answer. I imagine it's easier for maths teachers though? You have to set questions etc.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Use of confusing language. Think of for example: "take away" or "work out this sum" when you mean CALCULATION etc...
    • Study Helper
    Online

    13
    Study Helper
    Inappropriate questions for the age group.

    See here

    Edit:

    And here
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    A question with a 'real-life situation' that the student would have had no reason to come across.

    My maths teacher was telling us about a paper she was marking for year 10 where one of the questions asked them to work out how many rolls of wallpaper you would need to cover a wall but there was no leeway in the mark scheme for students who had never seen anyone hanging wallpaper before and didn't realise the strips go vertically. She had to give about half of them no marks because they worked it out with horizontal strips.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ghostwalker)
    Inappropriate questions for the age group.

    See here

    Edit:

    And here
    Those are actually crazy!
    • Study Helper
    Online

    13
    Study Helper
    (Original post by Music99)
    Those are actually crazy!
    Indeed. But a real life example!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ghostwalker)
    Indeed. But a real life example!
    Only in Singapore XD.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I have had tests in the past where at the beginning they have stood at the front and said "Actually, this question is impossible, don't try to do it." That seems like bad form.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ghostwalker)
    Inappropriate questions for the age group.

    See here

    Edit:

    And here
    haha, you can't say he wasn't creative..
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CodeJack)
    hahahaha, you can't say he wasn't creative..
    I have to admit I did laugh :P.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by Music99)
    So I'm applying for a teaching position at my uni, and one thing we are asked to write a brief summary of is what makes a bad maths question. Now I've got some ideas myself, but was wondering if anyone could give me there input so I can get a more general idea, as obviously opinions will differ on this.

    My ideas: It's ambiguous in it's wording. It doesn't require the mathematician to think or stretch them in any particular way.
    At A-level, I remember questions where they'd ask you to use unnecessary substitutions to evaluate integrals (i.e where it was possible to integrate directly)

    Those are bad questions!
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    No answer
    And what if the answer is that there is no answer?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lord of the Flies)
    And what if the answer is that there is no answer?
    Then there is an answer
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    A badly worded problem (rather commonplace in permutation/combination ones) where the demands of a working process can be interpreted in more than one manner.

    And as Indeterminate has pointed out earlier, redundant suggestions of substitutions in integrals which can be cracked open directly are just plain sickening. Why make something difficult when it is actually so easy to solve? Sheesh.

    Peace.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
    Useful resources

    Make your revision easier

    Maths

    Maths Forum posting guidelines

    Not sure where to post? Read the updated guidelines here

    Equations

    How to use LaTex

    Writing equations the easy way

    Student revising

    Study habits of A* students

    Top tips from students who have already aced their exams

    Study Planner

    Create your own Study Planner

    Never miss a deadline again

    Polling station sign

    Thinking about a maths degree?

    Chat with other maths applicants

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.