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    Basically all i wanted to know was wether when i get my math gcse result next month , should i do fm, if i get an a- i really want to do economics at cambridge, so can a high a at as fm offset another potentially lower as level- maybe a b in physics, but high as in econ,normal maths and eng lit
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    (Original post by haroon77)
    Basically all i wanted to know was wether when i get my math gcse result next month , should i do fm, if i get an a- i really want to do economics at cambridge, so can a high a at as fm offset another potentially lower as level- maybe a b in physics, but high as in econ,normal maths and eng lit
    If you have ambitions for Cambridge, you really ought to get an A* in GCSE mathematics. It is hard to say this without sounding sarcastic (and this is not my intention) but it would also be wise for you to start taking more care with your spelling, punctuation and grammar. You need to aim for A or A* grades in your A Levels. English Literature is a fine subject but it is not particularly relevant for Economics.
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    (Original post by haroon77)
    Basically all i wanted to know was wether when i get my math gcse result next month , should i do fm, if i get an a- i really want to do economics at cambridge, so can a high a at as fm offset another potentially lower as level- maybe a b in physics, but high as in econ,normal maths and eng lit
    Just to echo what MrM has said: you really do need to pay attention to writing coherent English. We all make minor slipups occasionally, especially when posting online, but no-one likes to struggle through a stream of text without punctuation trying to understand what someone else has written. Universities (and future employers) will not look favourably on candidates who cannot write to a decent standard

    A level requirements for Cambridge are typically A*AA so you should be aiming for that as a minimum - don't try to play games by trading off low grades against high ones because there will always be candidates who have high grades across all their subjects.

    As far as Maths goes, aim for the A* at GCSE but don't be disheartened if you only get an A - Cambridge understand that students mature at different rates and some people who don't get along with GCSEs may peak later on with their exam performance.

    A Level Maths is pretty much a pre-requisite for Economics at Cambridge; Further Maths is desirable but not essential (not all schools offer it). Economics is actually not essential either - some schools offer Business Studies instead which is not ideal, but can be used as a substitute if you're doing other more academic A levels. I think the principle is that anyone can be taught Economic concepts at Uni, but if they don't have a solid Maths background they will really struggle.

    I've just looked at my former college website for info and they say that English Literature, Politics and History are also "looked upon favourably" but are not essential, so if you aim to do something like Maths, Economics and English Literature with maybe Further Maths to AS then you're going to be in a good place. Some colleges apparently include the STEP exam as part of their entrance requirements but this is by no means universal. My college also says that they require 2 written school essays to be submitted - either on Economics if you take it at A level, or other Arts/Humanities subjects if not - which is another good reason for working on your writing skills.
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    If you have ambitions for Cambridge, you really ought to get an A* in GCSE mathematics. It is hard to say this without sounding sarcastic (and this is not my intention) but it would also be wise for you to start taking more care with your spelling, punctuation and grammar. You need to aim for A or A* grades in your A Levels. English Literature is a fine subject but it is not particularly relevant for Economics.
    The reason why i have initated this thread is because my school entered us in early for our maths gcse, which considering we haven't even finshed the entire course is an utter abomination, that's why i'm also highly unlikely to acheive an a* when our results come out in 2 weeks time.


    I also hope that the above paragraph underlined the fact that i do not speak or write like a text-speak freak. In terms of English Literature's correspondence to a degree in economics, i believe it shares a range of skills including analysis and its primary function as an essay writing subject, which in Cambridge is highly regarded, since one essay a week is a common regularity.

    Furthermore, i wouldn't even think of cambridge if i could not be able to acheive an a or a* at a level, i have this much belief and conviction that i can gain atleast these grades
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    (Original post by haroon77)
    I also hope that the above paragraph underlined the fact that i do not speak or write like a text-speak freak.
    I'm fairly convinced although your consistent failure to capitalise I rings alarm bells.
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    (Original post by haroon77)
    Basically all i wanted to know was wether when i get my math gcse result next month , should i do fm, if i get an a- i really want to do economics at cambridge, so can a high a at as fm offset another potentially lower as level- maybe a b in physics, but high as in econ,normal maths and eng lit
    Without abusing your grammar as everyone else seems to, I would recommend further maths A level if you are considering applying to Cambridge for economics. It would certainly help you if you get in and would definitely boost your application.

    Definitely put the work in to get that GCSE maths A*! Without that it could harm your application and it may make further maths A level hard if you can't get the GCSE. For Cambridge economics you really need 4As at AS to be properly considered, and high UMS marks would certainly help too!

    What do you think is stopping you getting A* GCSE?
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    I'm fairly convinced although your consistent failure to capitalise I rings alarm bells.
    I'm not trying to sound big-headed or anything, but if you have another insightful look at my previous post, you will see that there has been capitalisations on every new line and to say otherwise, is just a massive error in judgement
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    (Original post by TheIrrational)
    Without abusing your grammar as everyone else seems to, I would recommend further maths A level if you are considering applying to Cambridge for economics. It would certainly help you if you get in and would definitely boost your application.

    Definitely put the work in to get that GCSE maths A*! Without that it could harm your application and it may make further maths A level hard if you can't get the GCSE. For Cambridge economics you really need 4As at AS to be properly considered, and high UMS marks would certainly help too!

    What do you think is stopping you getting A* GCSE?
    I'm sorry for the informal demeanour of the opening post, as it has clearly evoked an unhealthy image, i was assuming that this was a forum- so to speak, but from now onwards will write in my typical formal prose.

    For the A*, our school entered us early, meaning we haven't covered the whole syllabus, especially the A* material ironically, for this reason, i juts don't think the A* is attainable, but i will definitly go over all of it in order to be finetuned for the a levels.

    P.S.- do you study at Cambridge by any chance ?
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    (Original post by haroon77)
    I'm sorry for the informal demeanour of the opening post, as it has clearly evoked an unhealthy image, i was assuming that this was a forum- so to speak, but from now onwards will write in my typical formal prose.

    For the A*, our school entered us early, meaning we haven't covered the whole syllabus, especially the A* material ironically, for this reason, i juts don't think the A* is attainable, but i will definitly go over all of it in order to be finetuned for the a levels.

    P.S.- do you study at Cambridge by any chance ?
    I'm not fussed how you type on here as long as I don't have to decrypt it! I would definitely suggest self teaching it, it shouldn't take long and shouldn't be too hard, and the rewards for getting that A* could be a Cambridge offer and you will be far more prepared for A level maths.

    I don't study at Cambridge, but I did apply, I study maths at Warwick, my cousin studied maths at Cambridge and my brother studies engineering there (we all went to a bad state school before you think we're from a posh Cambridge prep school) so I do know a fair bit about the application process.
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    (Original post by haroon77)
    I'm not trying to sound big-headed or anything, but if you have another insightful look at my previous post, you will see that there has been capitalisations on every new line and to say otherwise, is just a massive error in judgement
    You must admit that if your first post is compared to the later ones, then it's as if they were written by two different people (you're not are you??)

    Seriously, if you are highly motivated then you should be able to drive up your GCSE Maths grade to an A*. Get hold of a copy of the syllabus, make sure you have mastered all the topics, and ask your teachers to explain what you need to achieve in order to obtain an A* grade.

    In the worst case, an A at GCSE is unlikely to be too critical - if you can get impressive AS grades and a prediction of A*AA then you are in with a shot. However, you absolutely must deliver results in A level Maths (and ideally Further Maths).

    One other concern: if your school has entered you early for GCSE Maths, what Maths will you be practising before you get to A level to ensure you don't forget what you've learnt?
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    (Original post by haroon77)
    I'm not trying to sound big-headed or anything, but if you have another insightful look at my previous post, you will see that there has been capitalisations on every new line and to say otherwise, is just a massive error in judgement
    I believe MrM was talking about the fact that you've failed to capitalize the letter 'I' and not anything else.

    Having said that, I did not come here to grill you on your grammar - you will excel in time I am sure.

    You said that you're looking to apply to Cambridge, and that requires (as I'm sure you're aware of) very hard work. I cannot better anything that has been written above, but I will say this; do not be disheartened if your GCSE grades are not fantastic, as Cambridge do put a large emphasis on ums achieved at A-level. Having said that, keep in mind that you will have a great deal of competition and that you need to make yourself stand out.

    In terms of FM, I'm almost certain that its not a requirement, but speaking as a FM student, I think its great and it really gives you a wider outlook on maths.

    At the end of the day, the decision is up to you, but nevertheless, good luck young sir!
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    (Original post by TheIrrational)
    I'm not fussed how you type on here as long as I don't have to decrypt it! I would definitely suggest self teaching it, it shouldn't take long and shouldn't be too hard, and the rewards for getting that A* could be a Cambridge offer and you will be far more prepared for A level maths.

    I don't study at Cambridge, but I did apply, I study maths at Warwick, my cousin studied maths at Cambridge and my brother studies engineering there (we all went to a bad state school before you think we're from a posh Cambridge prep school) so I do know a fair bit about the application process.
    So they look at the gcses in which you have an a* in, i thought they just counted the a*s you get at gcse level, the thing of serious concern is that i really don't think that i will get the A* and i hate retaking, especially when you have 14 other exams, what where your a levels results like and i thought that Warwick were gcse nazis, in economics they don't look at applicants with less than 7A*s, any way congrats on your place there for maths
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    (Original post by davros)
    You must admit that if your first post is compared to the later ones, then it's as if they were written by two different people (you're not are you??)

    Seriously, if you are highly motivated then you should be able to drive up your GCSE Maths grade to an A*. Get hold of a copy of the syllabus, make sure you have mastered all the topics, and ask your teachers to explain what you need to achieve in order to obtain an A* grade.

    In the worst case, an A at GCSE is unlikely to be too critical - if you can get impressive AS grades and a prediction of A*AA then you are in with a shot. However, you absolutely must deliver results in A level Maths (and ideally Further Maths).

    One other concern: if your school has entered you early for GCSE Maths, what Maths will you be practising before you get to A level to ensure you don't forget what you've learnt?
    I've already picked my 4 alevels to be studied- Maths, Economics (love the subject) , Physics and English Literature, however i was wondering if I could do a Further Maths AS and Maths A level
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    (Original post by haroon77)
    So they look at the gcses in which you have an a* in, i thought they just counted the a*s you get at gcse level, the thing of serious concern is that i really don't think that i will get the A* and i hate retaking, especially when you have 14 other exams, what where your a levels results like and i thought that Warwick were gcse nazis, in economics they don't look at applicants with less than 7A*s, any way congrats on your place there for maths
    Cambridge consider the AS Module UMS scores and grades to be the best indicator of future performance, whilst GCSEs are important, doing well in any AS exams you take is more important.
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    (Original post by joostan)
    Cambridge consider the AS Module UMS scores and grades to be the best indicator of future performance, whilst GCSEs are important, doing well in any AS exams you take is more important.
    Would you think that 3-6 A*s in gcse ( below average) are adequate for Cambridge economics, considering they're from a state school which had a 43% pass on the 5 A*-C gcse guideline, but rather annoyingly, this year our new head, has fundamentally transformed the school, we are on around about 70-80% on the guideline, do you think Cambridge will know about the 43% pass rate ?
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    (Original post by haroon77)
    Would you think that 3-6 A*s in gcse ( below average) are adequate for Cambridge economics, considering they're from a state school which had a 43% pass on the 5 A*-C gcse guideline, but rather annoyingly, this year our new head, has fundamentally transformed the school, we are on around about 70-80% on the guideline, do you think Cambridge will know about the 43% pass rate ?
    You can tell them, in the additional information and extenuating circumstances - SAQ section of your application if you think it'll make a difference. I've already said that the AS exams are more important, so provided you do well in those, you'll be fine.
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    (Original post by haroon77)
    I've already picked my 4 alevels to be studied- Maths, Economics (love the subject) , Physics and English Literature, however i was wondering if I could do a Further Maths AS and Maths A level
    That's a perfectly good set of A levels as preparation for Economics to be honest. You could aim to take Further Maths AS as well - it depends on how you come to terms with the workload, but it is not unknown for people to do 5 AS levels (or even more). Even if you don't take an AS exam in the subject, there is nothing to stop you reading more widely around the subject.

    Just see how you get on with your 4 chosen subjects, and do some Further Maths reading if you find you've got time.
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    (Original post by davros)
    That's a perfectly good set of A levels as preparation for Economics to be honest. You could aim to take Further Maths AS as well - it depends on how you come to terms with the workload, but it is not unknown for people to do 5 AS levels (or even more). Even if you don't take an AS exam in the subject, there is nothing to stop you reading more widely around the subject.

    Just see how you get on with your 4 chosen subjects, and do some Further Maths reading if you find you've got time.
    Knowing that most public school applicants will have it- how difficult is it, how complex is it?
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    (Original post by haroon77)
    So they look at the gcses in which you have an a* in, i thought they just counted the a*s you get at gcse level, the thing of serious concern is that i really don't think that i will get the A* and i hate retaking, especially when you have 14 other exams, what where your a levels results like and i thought that Warwick were gcse nazis, in economics they don't look at applicants with less than 7A*s, any way congrats on your place there for maths
    I'm not 100% sure how they analyse GCSE results, could be different for different colleges, if your AS results are good it could be worth replying. I got 6A*s, 4As GCSE and AAAABC AS and A*A*A A2, but my UMS wasn't good enough for Cambridge maths.
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    (Original post by MBT Bot)
    It's been a while since you posted and nobody's replied yet...maybe you should check out MarkedbyTeachers.com, TSR's sister site. It has the largest library of essays in the UK with over 173,000+ coursework, essays, homeworks etc.. all written by GCSE, A Level, University and IB students across all topics.

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