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    Last year I took lots of pictures on holiday, and when I got back I found the majority of pictures had a faint dark circle, which was dirt on the lens. I don't like cleaning the lens because it's so expensive and I don't want to scratch it. Ideally i'd like to keep it perfectly dust free.

    Is there any way I can do this? I have a Sony NEX C3.

    I'm just wondering if anyone has any tips on keeping it dust/ dirt free
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    Put a plastic film over the top. Or keep it properly covered when you don't use it. Or just give it a wipe????!

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    If you have a microfibre glasses cloth, give it a wipe with that. If not, there are lens cleaning kits on amazon, such as: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hama-0000560...4646903&sr=8-1
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    Get a UV filter for it if you want. Easier to replace if they get scratched.


    Edit: can't see a screw thread on NEX lenses?
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    I have one of THESE but in reality you just need a cleaning brush, microfibre cloth and some optical cleaning fluid. Make sure the brush is super soft as harsher ones may knacker the elements.

    Before I say how I clean my lenses, I'd like to mention that I have a clear UV filter over each lens to protect the actual lens from damage. I usually clean the filter, but if I'm doing an important shoot I will remove the filter to maximise quality (though, most decent UV filters will not degrade quality by any noticeable amount).

    I start by turning the lens upside down and lightly brushing the visible dirt and dust off. This is important because when you clean the lens you don't want to rub the dirt into the glass as it may cause scratches.

    Wrap the cloth around your finger and spray a little bit of the cleaning fluid onto the cloth. Give it a second to sink in. Then, rub the glass around in circles until it stops forming blobs of liquid. Then, give it 30-60 seconds and polish the surface with a clean, dry, part of the cloth.

    Check the quality of the cleaning by reflecting light off the surface... Just shine it off a lamp or against the window and check that all the dirt and rubbish has been removed.


    Don't clean the sensor (the chip inside the camera) this way because this will likely knacker the filters over it. There are specialised cleaning systems for that, or take it to a shop to get it done. You can tell if there is dirt on the sensor by setting the aperture to a really high value (f/22 or so) and then taking a photo of a white surface with the focus at, say, infinity. If you see any black dots or marks in the image (and the lens is clean) then your sensor is dirty.
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    (Original post by Pegasus2)
    Get a UV filter for it if you want. Easier to replace if they get scratched.


    Edit: can't see a screw thread on NEX lenses?
    Errm, no there isn't one on the outside of the lens, but there is a very thin one on the inside. I've looked a the filters but it would mean I either can't use the lens cap or I can't use the cone thing that you stick on the end of the lens.

    (Original post by SillyEddy)
    I have one of THESE but in reality you just need a cleaning brush, microfibre cloth and some optical cleaning fluid. Make sure the brush is super soft as harsher ones may knacker the elements.

    Before I say how I clean my lenses, I'd like to mention that I have a clear UV filter over each lens to protect the actual lens from damage. I usually clean the filter, but if I'm doing an important shoot I will remove the filter to maximise quality (though, most decent UV filters will not degrade quality by any noticeable amount).

    I start by turning the lens upside down and lightly brushing the visible dirt and dust off. This is important because when you clean the lens you don't want to rub the dirt into the glass as it may cause scratches.

    Wrap the cloth around your finger and spray a little bit of the cleaning fluid onto the cloth. Give it a second to sink in. Then, rub the glass around in circles until it stops forming blobs of liquid. Then, give it 30-60 seconds and polish the surface with a clean, dry, part of the cloth.

    Check the quality of the cleaning by reflecting light off the surface... Just shine it off a lamp or against the window and check that all the dirt and rubbish has been removed.


    Don't clean the sensor (the chip inside the camera) this way because this will likely knacker the filters over it. There are specialised cleaning systems for that, or take it to a shop to get it done. You can tell if there is dirt on the sensor by setting the aperture to a really high value (f/22 or so) and then taking a photo of a white surface with the focus at, say, infinity. If you see any black dots or marks in the image (and the lens is clean) then your sensor is dirty.
    Thanks. That's helpful
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    (Original post by Runninground)
    or I can't use the cone thing that you stick on the end of the lens.
    I see. A lens hood.
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    Hot soapy water?
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    I've got one of these Hama pens

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hama-0000560...4743624&sr=1-1
 
 
 
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